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Anger Management

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Robert J. Fetsch – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program: a follow‐up validation study
    Family Relations, 2008
    Co-Authors: Robert J. Fetsch, Raymond K. Yang, Matthew J. Pettit

    Abstract:

    This study is the first follow-up assessment of the RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program. Parent participants (N = 168) reduced their Anger, violence, and family conflict levels from posttest to follow-up, on average, at 2.5 months on 13 of 15 dependent variables. Current findings are consistent with a small, albeit growing body of literature supporting the efficacy of RETHINK in improving Anger Management and parenting skills. When mothers and fathers participate in 6 or 7 weekly RETHINK sessions, they appear to learn the verbal reasoning skills they need to lower their Anger, conflict, and violence levels and the changes persist for at least 2.5 months.

  • a preliminary evaluation of the colorado rethink parenting and Anger Management program
    Child Abuse & Neglect, 1999
    Co-Authors: Robert J. Fetsch, Carol J Schultz, James J Wahler

    Abstract:

    Abstract Objective: The purpose was to report preliminary behavioral, social, and emotional results, and to project some potential economic results of a parenting and Anger Management program in a mountain state. Method: Following local and state-wide needs assessments, child abuse prevention was identified as the number two critical issue. An effective, research-based, preventive educational workshop program—RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management—was selected for testing and program evaluation. Measurable outcome objectives were written and assessments were developed and tested. A one-group pretest-posttest design with a convenience sample of parents was used for the study. Seventy-five of 99 parents completed pretests before and posttests after participating in the 6-week series of skill-enhancing workshops. Results: Using a repeated measures analysis of variance, participants’ group mean Anger control levels increased ( p = .016). Their family conflict levels fell ( p = .006). Their overall Anger levels fell ( p = .000). Their violence levels fell, verbal aggression levels fell ( p = .002). Their partners’ violence levels also fell, verbal aggression levels fell ( p = .004), and physical aggression levels fell ( p = .032). In addition, participants reported increased knowledge levels (100%), improved attitudes (97.3%), improved behaviors (94.7%), and decreased unrealistic expectations of their children (69.3%). Conclusion: The findings suggest that professional preventive education specialists may now have an effective program to assist parents in managing their Anger. Further research is encouraged. When parents participate in 6 weeks of skill building with well-trained professionals, positive changes in parenting and Anger Management are possible. Spanish abstract not available at time of publication.

James J Wahler – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • a preliminary evaluation of the colorado rethink parenting and Anger Management program
    Child Abuse & Neglect, 1999
    Co-Authors: Robert J. Fetsch, Carol J Schultz, James J Wahler

    Abstract:

    Abstract Objective: The purpose was to report preliminary behavioral, social, and emotional results, and to project some potential economic results of a parenting and Anger Management program in a mountain state. Method: Following local and state-wide needs assessments, child abuse prevention was identified as the number two critical issue. An effective, research-based, preventive educational workshop program—RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management—was selected for testing and program evaluation. Measurable outcome objectives were written and assessments were developed and tested. A one-group pretest-posttest design with a convenience sample of parents was used for the study. Seventy-five of 99 parents completed pretests before and posttests after participating in the 6-week series of skill-enhancing workshops. Results: Using a repeated measures analysis of variance, participants’ group mean Anger control levels increased ( p = .016). Their family conflict levels fell ( p = .006). Their overall Anger levels fell ( p = .000). Their violence levels fell, verbal aggression levels fell ( p = .002). Their partners’ violence levels also fell, verbal aggression levels fell ( p = .004), and physical aggression levels fell ( p = .032). In addition, participants reported increased knowledge levels (100%), improved attitudes (97.3%), improved behaviors (94.7%), and decreased unrealistic expectations of their children (69.3%). Conclusion: The findings suggest that professional preventive education specialists may now have an effective program to assist parents in managing their Anger. Further research is encouraged. When parents participate in 6 weeks of skill building with well-trained professionals, positive changes in parenting and Anger Management are possible. Spanish abstract not available at time of publication.

Maureen Groer – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • religiousness spirituality and Anger Management in community dwelling older persons
    Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 2014
    Co-Authors: Linda C Mefford, Sandra P Thomas, Bonnie Callen, Maureen Groer

    Abstract:

    Mismanaged Anger is associated with adverse health outcomes. This study examined whether dimensions of religiousness/spirituality could predict healthy Anger Management in a sample of 82 community-dwelling older Americans. A correlational research design was employed using the Deffenbacher Anger Scale and the Brief Multidimensional Measure of Religiousness/Spirituality. Higher scores on Forgiveness, Daily Spiritual Experiences, Religiousness/Spirituality as Coping, and Self-Ranking of Religiousness/Spirituality were correlated with healthier Anger Management; however forgiveness was the only significant predictor in the regression analysis. Interventions to facilitate forgiveness may promote healthy Anger Management and minimize the adverse health effects of mismanaged Anger.

  • Religiousness/Spirituality and Anger Management in Community-Dwelling Older Persons
    Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 2014
    Co-Authors: Linda C Mefford, Sandra P Thomas, Bonnie Callen, Maureen Groer

    Abstract:

    Mismanaged Anger is associated with adverse health outcomes. This study examined whether dimensions of religiousness/spirituality could predict healthy Anger Management in a sample of 82 community-dwelling older Americans. A correlational research design was employed using the Deffenbacher Anger Scale and the Brief Multidimensional Measure of Religiousness/Spirituality. Higher scores on Forgiveness, Daily Spiritual Experiences, Religiousness/Spirituality as Coping, and Self-Ranking of Religiousness/Spirituality were correlated with healthier Anger Management; however forgiveness was the only significant predictor in the regression analysis. Interventions to facilitate forgiveness may promote healthy Anger Management and minimize the adverse health effects of mismanaged Anger.