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Angular Deviation

The Experts below are selected from a list of 315 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Susumu Harada – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • the angle mouse target agnostic dynamic gain adjustment based on Angular Deviation
    Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2009
    Co-Authors: Jacob O Wobbrock, James Fogarty, Shunichi Kimuro, Susumu Harada

    Abstract:

    We present a novel method of dynamic C-D gain adaptation that improves target acquisition for users with motor impairments. Our method, called the Angle Mouse, adjusts the mouse C-D gain based on the Deviation of angles sampled during movement. When Angular Deviation is low, the gain is kept high. When Angular Deviation is high, the gain is dropped, making the target bigger in motor-space. A key feature of the Angle Mouse is that, unlike most pointing facilitation techniques, it is target-agnostic, requiring no knowledge of target locations or dimensions. This means that the problem of distractor targets is avoided because adaptation is based solely on the user’s behavior. In a study of 16 people, 8 of which had motor impairments, we found that the Angle Mouse improved motor-impaired pointing throughput by 10.3% over the Windows default mouse and 11.0% over sticky icons. For able-bodied users, there was no significant difference among the three techniques, as Angle Mouse throughput was within 1.2% of the default. Thus, the Angle Mouse improved pointing performance for users with motor impairments while remaining unobtrusive for able-bodied users.

  • CHI – The angle mouse: target-agnostic dynamic gain adjustment based on Angular Deviation
    Proceedings of the 27th international conference on Human factors in computing systems – CHI 09, 2009
    Co-Authors: Jacob O Wobbrock, James Fogarty, Shunichi Kimuro, Susumu Harada

    Abstract:

    We present a novel method of dynamic C-D gain adaptation that improves target acquisition for users with motor impairments. Our method, called the Angle Mouse, adjusts the mouse C-D gain based on the Deviation of angles sampled during movement. When Angular Deviation is low, the gain is kept high. When Angular Deviation is high, the gain is dropped, making the target bigger in motor-space. A key feature of the Angle Mouse is that, unlike most pointing facilitation techniques, it is target-agnostic, requiring no knowledge of target locations or dimensions. This means that the problem of distractor targets is avoided because adaptation is based solely on the user’s behavior. In a study of 16 people, 8 of which had motor impairments, we found that the Angle Mouse improved motor-impaired pointing throughput by 10.3% over the Windows default mouse and 11.0% over sticky icons. For able-bodied users, there was no significant difference among the three techniques, as Angle Mouse throughput was within 1.2% of the default. Thus, the Angle Mouse improved pointing performance for users with motor impairments while remaining unobtrusive for able-bodied users.

Jacob O Wobbrock – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • the angle mouse target agnostic dynamic gain adjustment based on Angular Deviation
    Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2009
    Co-Authors: Jacob O Wobbrock, James Fogarty, Shunichi Kimuro, Susumu Harada

    Abstract:

    We present a novel method of dynamic C-D gain adaptation that improves target acquisition for users with motor impairments. Our method, called the Angle Mouse, adjusts the mouse C-D gain based on the Deviation of angles sampled during movement. When Angular Deviation is low, the gain is kept high. When Angular Deviation is high, the gain is dropped, making the target bigger in motor-space. A key feature of the Angle Mouse is that, unlike most pointing facilitation techniques, it is target-agnostic, requiring no knowledge of target locations or dimensions. This means that the problem of distractor targets is avoided because adaptation is based solely on the user’s behavior. In a study of 16 people, 8 of which had motor impairments, we found that the Angle Mouse improved motor-impaired pointing throughput by 10.3% over the Windows default mouse and 11.0% over sticky icons. For able-bodied users, there was no significant difference among the three techniques, as Angle Mouse throughput was within 1.2% of the default. Thus, the Angle Mouse improved pointing performance for users with motor impairments while remaining unobtrusive for able-bodied users.

  • CHI – The angle mouse: target-agnostic dynamic gain adjustment based on Angular Deviation
    Proceedings of the 27th international conference on Human factors in computing systems – CHI 09, 2009
    Co-Authors: Jacob O Wobbrock, James Fogarty, Shunichi Kimuro, Susumu Harada

    Abstract:

    We present a novel method of dynamic C-D gain adaptation that improves target acquisition for users with motor impairments. Our method, called the Angle Mouse, adjusts the mouse C-D gain based on the Deviation of angles sampled during movement. When Angular Deviation is low, the gain is kept high. When Angular Deviation is high, the gain is dropped, making the target bigger in motor-space. A key feature of the Angle Mouse is that, unlike most pointing facilitation techniques, it is target-agnostic, requiring no knowledge of target locations or dimensions. This means that the problem of distractor targets is avoided because adaptation is based solely on the user’s behavior. In a study of 16 people, 8 of which had motor impairments, we found that the Angle Mouse improved motor-impaired pointing throughput by 10.3% over the Windows default mouse and 11.0% over sticky icons. For able-bodied users, there was no significant difference among the three techniques, as Angle Mouse throughput was within 1.2% of the default. Thus, the Angle Mouse improved pointing performance for users with motor impairments while remaining unobtrusive for able-bodied users.

J. P. Woerdman – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Observing Angular Deviations in the specular reflection of a light beam
    Nature Photonics, 2009
    Co-Authors: M. Merano, A. Aiello, M. P. Van Exter, J. P. Woerdman

    Abstract:

    A small Angular Deviation of the law of reflection has been previously predicted for a light beam, and is a consequence of the Angular dependence of the reflectivity. Experimental proof of such a Deviation at near-infrared wavelengths is now reported. The Law of Reflection of a light ray incident upon a mirror ( θ _in = θ_out) was first formulated by Euclid around 300 bc in his book Catoptrics ^ 1 ; it has been a tenet of geometrical optics ever since. However, more recently, a small Angular Deviation of the Law of Reflection has been predicted for a physical light beam when this is regarded as the implementation of a ray^ 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 . The Deviation is a diffractive consequence of the Angular dependence of the reflectivity and should occur for any mirror with less than 100% reflectivity. We report here experimental proof of this Angular Deviation by determining the direction of an optical beam after reflection from an air–glass interface, using a position detector with nanometre resolution. Our results are relevant for Angular metrology in general and cantilever-based surface microscopies in particular. Analogous Angular Deviations are expected for reflection of acoustic waves and quantum matter waves.

  • Observing Angular Deviations in specular reflection of light
    Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics International Quantum Electronics Conference, 2009
    Co-Authors: M. Merano, A. Aiello, M. P. Van Exter, J. P. Woerdman

    Abstract:

    We measure the direction of a TEM 00 Gaussian beam reflected from an air-glass interface. We report experimental evidence of an Angular Deviation of the beam axis from the Reflection Law for a light ray.