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Animal Ecology

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Nathalie Pettorelli – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • energy availability spatio temporal variability and implications for Animal Ecology
    Diversity and Distributions, 2015
    Co-Authors: Clare Duncan, Alienor L. M. Chauvenet, Molly E. Brown, Nathalie Pettorelli
    Abstract:

    AimGlobal environmental change, through anthropogenic activities and climatic changes, is promoting broad-scale alterations to energy availability across the world’s ecosystems. However, spatio-temporal variation in available energy is a key driver of Animals’ life histories, movement patterns and abundance, thus shaping the global distribution of individuals and species. As such, there is an increasing need to understand how and where changes to energy availability will produce the greatest impacts on Animal Ecology, and ultimately on the distribution of biodiversity.

  • Energy availability, spatio‐temporal variability and implications for Animal Ecology
    Diversity and Distributions, 2014
    Co-Authors: Clare Duncan, Alienor L. M. Chauvenet, Molly E. Brown, Nathalie Pettorelli
    Abstract:

    AimGlobal environmental change, through anthropogenic activities and climatic changes, is promoting broad-scale alterations to energy availability across the world’s ecosystems. However, spatio-temporal variation in available energy is a key driver of Animals’ life histories, movement patterns and abundance, thus shaping the global distribution of individuals and species. As such, there is an increasing need to understand how and where changes to energy availability will produce the greatest impacts on Animal Ecology, and ultimately on the distribution of biodiversity.

  • The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI): unforeseen successes in Animal Ecology
    Climate Research, 2011
    Co-Authors: Nathalie Pettorelli, Sadie J. Ryan, Thomas Mueller, Nils Bunnefeld, Bogumiła Jędrzejewska, Mauricio Lima, Kyrre L. Kausrud
    Abstract:

    This review highlights the latest developments associated with the use of the Normal- ized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) in Ecology. Over the last decade, the NDVI has proven extremely useful in predicting herbivore and non-herbivore distribution, abundance and life history traits in space and time. Due to the continuous nature of NDVI since mid-1981, the relative impor- tance of different temporal and spatial lags on population performance can be assessed, widening our understanding of population dynamics. Previously thought to be most useful in temperate environ- ments, the utility of this satellite-derived index has been demonstrated even in sparsely vegetated areas. Climate models can be used to reconstruct historical patterns in vegetation dynamics in addi- tion to anticipating the effects of future environmental change on biodiversity. NDVI has thus been established as a crucial tool for assessing past and future population and biodiversity consequences of change in climate, vegetation phenology and primary productivity.

Francesca Cagnacci – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • SIGSPATIAL/GIS – Extracting stay regions with uncertain boundaries from GPS trajectories: a case study in Animal Ecology
    Proceedings of the 22nd ACM SIGSPATIAL International Conference on Advances in Geographic Information Systems, 2014
    Co-Authors: Maria Luisa Damiani, Hamza Issa, Francesca Cagnacci
    Abstract:

    In this paper we present a time-aware, density-based clustering technique for the identification of stay regions in trajectories of low-sampling-rate GPS points, and its application to the study of Animal migrations. A stay region is defined as a portion of space which generally does not designate a precise geographical entity and where an object is significantly present for a period of time, in spite of relatively short periods of absence. Stay regions can delimit for example the residence of Animals, i.e. the home-range. The proposed technique enables the extraction of stay regions represented by dense and temporally disjoint sub-trajectories, through the specification of a small set of parameters related to density and presence. While this work takes inspiration from the field of Animal Ecology, we argue that the approach can be of more general concern and used in perspective in different domains, e.g. the study of human mobility over large temporal scales. We experiment with the approach on a case study, regarding the seasonal migration of a group of roe deer.

  • extracting stay regions with uncertain boundaries from gps trajectories a case study in Animal Ecology
    Advances in Geographic Information Systems, 2014
    Co-Authors: Maria Luisa Damiani, Hamza Issa, Francesca Cagnacci
    Abstract:

    In this paper we present a time-aware, density-based clustering technique for the identification of stay regions in trajectories of low-sampling-rate GPS points, and its application to the study of Animal migrations. A stay region is defined as a portion of space which generally does not designate a precise geographical entity and where an object is significantly present for a period of time, in spite of relatively short periods of absence. Stay regions can delimit for example the residence of Animals, i.e. the home-range. The proposed technique enables the extraction of stay regions represented by dense and temporally disjoint sub-trajectories, through the specification of a small set of parameters related to density and presence. While this work takes inspiration from the field of Animal Ecology, we argue that the approach can be of more general concern and used in perspective in different domains, e.g. the study of human mobility over large temporal scales. We experiment with the approach on a case study, regarding the seasonal migration of a group of roe deer.

  • Animal Ecology meets GPS-based radiotelemetry: A perfect storm of opportunities and challenges
    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 2010
    Co-Authors: Francesca Cagnacci, Luigi Boitani, Roger A Powell, Mark S Boyce
    Abstract:

    Global positioning system (GPS) telemetry technology allows us to monitor and to map the details of Animal movement, securing vast quantities of such data even for highly cryptic organisms. We envision an exciting synergy between Animal Ecology and GPS-based radiotelemetry, as for other examples of new technologies stimulating rapid conceptual advances, where research opportunities have been paralleled by technical and analytical challenges. Animal positions provide the elemental unit of movement paths and show where individuals interact with the ecosystems around them. We discuss how knowing where Animals go can help scientists in their search for a mechanistic understanding of key concepts of Animal Ecology, including resource use, home range and dispersal, and population dynamics. It is probable that in the not-so-distant future, intense sampling of movements coupled with detailed information on habitat features at a variety of scales will allow us to represent an Animal‘s cognitive map of its environment, and the intimate relationship between behaviour and fitness. An extended use of these data over long periods of time and over large spatial scales can provide robust inferences for complex, multi-factorial phenomena, such as meta-analyses of the effects of climate change on Animal behaviour and distribution.

Peter Livermore – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the times they are a changin evolution and revolution in Animal Ecology publishing
    Journal of Animal Ecology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Kenneth Wilson, Tim Coulson, Mike Boots, Liz Baker, Peter Livermore
    Abstract:

    The times they are a-changin’: evolution and revolution in Animal Ecology publishing Kenneth Wilson*, Tim Coulson, Mike Boots, Liz Baker and Peter Livermore Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK; Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus, Exeter, UK; and British Ecological Society, London, UK

  • The times they are a‐changin’: evolution and revolution in Animal Ecology publishing
    Journal of Animal Ecology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Kenneth Wilson, Tim Coulson, Mike Boots, Liz Baker, Peter Livermore
    Abstract:

    The times they are a-changin’: evolution and revolution in Animal Ecology publishing Kenneth Wilson*, Tim Coulson, Mike Boots, Liz Baker and Peter Livermore Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK; Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus, Exeter, UK; and British Ecological Society, London, UK

  • Publishing the best original research in Animal Ecology: looking forward from 2013.
    The Journal of animal ecology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Tim Coulson, Graeme C. Hays, Mike Boots, Kenneth Wilson, Liz Baker, Peter Livermore
    Abstract:

    In a world where impact factors and journal rankings are pored over by prospective authors and publishers alike, 2012 was an excellent year for the Journal of Animal Ecology as our impact factor rose to 4937. However, maximizing a journal’s impact factor should not be the only focus of editors. The primary role of the Journal of Animal Ecology is to publish papers that Animal ecologists will find novel and thought-provoking and which advance the broader field of Animal Ecology. Over the last 81 years, the journal has published some of the most influential research in Animal Ecology, and we remain dedicated to publishing papers that challenge current ideas and shape the field. This is certainly evident in the articles we have published over the last year; whether it has been unravelling the Ecology of wildlife diseases, tracing the movements and mapping space use of Animals or disentangling the myriad interactions that shape Animal communities and ecosystems, topical, cutting-edge research has occupied space in every issue. This coming year will be no exception, and we hope to continue receiving such high-quality work. As ever, the journal’s focus and emphasis is on work using data and analyses to quantitatively test theory or to develop new ideas. Reports of advances in both the way data are collected and the way they are analysed continue to provide exciting research avenues for the future that we wish to include in the pages of this publication. And that is true for all areas of Animal Ecology research; we welcome submissions ranging from molecular to macroecological studies. This range is reflected in the breadth of expertise on our Editorial Board. Our Associate Editors, along with the many kind reviewers who freely gave their time to assess the manuscripts submitted to the journal, did a fantastic job in making 2012 the success it was. We look forward to another prosperous year ahead. During 2012, we saw various personnel changes within the journal’s editorial office. Jenny Guthrie, our Managing Editor for 10 years, left the employ of the British Ecological Society following a restructure of the Society’s publications team. Jenny played a critical role in developing the journal over the last decade, and much of its current success is due to her eye for detail and hard work. The restructure has seen the appointment of Peter Livermore as the journal’s Assistant Editor and Liz Baker take over as

Kenneth Wilson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Transparency and open processes in Journal of Animal Ecology
    The Journal of animal ecology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Kenneth Wilson, Ben C. Sheldon, Jean-michel Gaillard, Nathan J. Sanders, Simon P. G. Hoggart, Erika Newton
    Abstract:

    Transparency in science is an increasingly important topic and it is clear that this is also important to our readers. Taking inspiration from the 2017 Peer Review Week (https://peerreviewweek.wordpress.com/) theme of transparency, in this editorial, we look at the different ways that we have introduced openness and transparency in the publication process and more widely in journal practices. In 2016, we introduced author contribution statements in all published papers and offered a new data sources section for papers containing meta-analyses to enable the data sources to receive proper citation credit within the main article. Our efforts in 2017 range from giving a clear and transparent breakdown of the peer review process for the Journal (http://bit.ly/BESReviewProcess) to larger initiatives such as an open call for new Associate Editors, more on this below.

  • the times they are a changin evolution and revolution in Animal Ecology publishing
    Journal of Animal Ecology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Kenneth Wilson, Tim Coulson, Mike Boots, Liz Baker, Peter Livermore
    Abstract:

    The times they are a-changin’: evolution and revolution in Animal Ecology publishing Kenneth Wilson*, Tim Coulson, Mike Boots, Liz Baker and Peter Livermore Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK; Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus, Exeter, UK; and British Ecological Society, London, UK

  • The times they are a‐changin’: evolution and revolution in Animal Ecology publishing
    Journal of Animal Ecology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Kenneth Wilson, Tim Coulson, Mike Boots, Liz Baker, Peter Livermore
    Abstract:

    The times they are a-changin’: evolution and revolution in Animal Ecology publishing Kenneth Wilson*, Tim Coulson, Mike Boots, Liz Baker and Peter Livermore Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK; Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus, Exeter, UK; and British Ecological Society, London, UK

Clare Duncan – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • energy availability spatio temporal variability and implications for Animal Ecology
    Diversity and Distributions, 2015
    Co-Authors: Clare Duncan, Alienor L. M. Chauvenet, Molly E. Brown, Nathalie Pettorelli
    Abstract:

    AimGlobal environmental change, through anthropogenic activities and climatic changes, is promoting broad-scale alterations to energy availability across the world’s ecosystems. However, spatio-temporal variation in available energy is a key driver of Animals’ life histories, movement patterns and abundance, thus shaping the global distribution of individuals and species. As such, there is an increasing need to understand how and where changes to energy availability will produce the greatest impacts on Animal Ecology, and ultimately on the distribution of biodiversity.

  • Energy availability, spatio‐temporal variability and implications for Animal Ecology
    Diversity and Distributions, 2014
    Co-Authors: Clare Duncan, Alienor L. M. Chauvenet, Molly E. Brown, Nathalie Pettorelli
    Abstract:

    AimGlobal environmental change, through anthropogenic activities and climatic changes, is promoting broad-scale alterations to energy availability across the world’s ecosystems. However, spatio-temporal variation in available energy is a key driver of Animals’ life histories, movement patterns and abundance, thus shaping the global distribution of individuals and species. As such, there is an increasing need to understand how and where changes to energy availability will produce the greatest impacts on Animal Ecology, and ultimately on the distribution of biodiversity.