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Animal Society

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Simon Dedeo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Social Feedback and the Emergence of Rank in Animal Society.
    PLoS computational biology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Elizabeth A. Hobson, Simon Dedeo
    Abstract:

    Dominance hierarchies are group-level properties that emerge from the aggression of individuals. Although individuals can gain critical benefits from their position in a hierarchy, we do not understand how real-world hierarchies form. Nor do we understand what signals and decision-rules individuals use to construct and maintain hierarchies in the absence of simple cues such as size or spatial location. A study of conflict in two groups of captive monk parakeets (Myiopsitta monachus) found that a transition to large-scale order in aggression occurred in newly-formed groups after one week, with individuals thereafter preferring to direct aggression more frequently against those nearby in rank. We consider two cognitive mechanisms underlying the emergence of this order: inference based on overall levels of aggression, or on subsets of the aggression network. Both mechanisms were predictive of individual decisions to aggress, but observed patterns were better explained by rank inference through subsets of the aggression network. Based on these results, we present a new theory, of a feedback loop between knowledge of rank and consequent behavior. This loop explains the transition to strategic aggression and the formation and persistence of dominance hierarchies in groups capable of both social memory and inference.

  • Social feedback and the emergence of rank in Animal Society
    , 2015
    Co-Authors: Elizabeth A. Hobson, Simon Dedeo
    Abstract:

    Dominance hierarchies are group-level properties that emerge from the aggressions of individuals. Although individuals can gain critical benefits from their position in a hierarchy, we do not understand how real-world hierarchies form, or what signals and decision-rules individuals use to construct and maintain them in the absence of simple cues. A study of aggression in two groups of captive monk parakeets (Myiopsitta monachus) found a transition to large-scale ordered aggression occurred in newly-formed groups after one week, with individuals thereafter preferring to direct aggression against those nearby in rank. We describe two mechanisms by which individuals may determine rank order: inference based on overall levels of aggression, or on subsets of the aggression network. Both pathways were predictive of individual decisions to aggress. Based on these results, we present a new theory, of a feedback loop between knowledge of rank and consequent behavior, that explains the transition to strategic aggression, and the formation and persistence of dominance hierarchies in groups capable of both social memory and social inference.

Elizabeth A. Hobson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Social Feedback and the Emergence of Rank in Animal Society.
    PLoS computational biology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Elizabeth A. Hobson, Simon Dedeo
    Abstract:

    Dominance hierarchies are group-level properties that emerge from the aggression of individuals. Although individuals can gain critical benefits from their position in a hierarchy, we do not understand how real-world hierarchies form. Nor do we understand what signals and decision-rules individuals use to construct and maintain hierarchies in the absence of simple cues such as size or spatial location. A study of conflict in two groups of captive monk parakeets (Myiopsitta monachus) found that a transition to large-scale order in aggression occurred in newly-formed groups after one week, with individuals thereafter preferring to direct aggression more frequently against those nearby in rank. We consider two cognitive mechanisms underlying the emergence of this order: inference based on overall levels of aggression, or on subsets of the aggression network. Both mechanisms were predictive of individual decisions to aggress, but observed patterns were better explained by rank inference through subsets of the aggression network. Based on these results, we present a new theory, of a feedback loop between knowledge of rank and consequent behavior. This loop explains the transition to strategic aggression and the formation and persistence of dominance hierarchies in groups capable of both social memory and inference.

  • Social feedback and the emergence of rank in Animal Society
    , 2015
    Co-Authors: Elizabeth A. Hobson, Simon Dedeo
    Abstract:

    Dominance hierarchies are group-level properties that emerge from the aggressions of individuals. Although individuals can gain critical benefits from their position in a hierarchy, we do not understand how real-world hierarchies form, or what signals and decision-rules individuals use to construct and maintain them in the absence of simple cues. A study of aggression in two groups of captive monk parakeets (Myiopsitta monachus) found a transition to large-scale ordered aggression occurred in newly-formed groups after one week, with individuals thereafter preferring to direct aggression against those nearby in rank. We describe two mechanisms by which individuals may determine rank order: inference based on overall levels of aggression, or on subsets of the aggression network. Both pathways were predictive of individual decisions to aggress. Based on these results, we present a new theory, of a feedback loop between knowledge of rank and consequent behavior, that explains the transition to strategic aggression, and the formation and persistence of dominance hierarchies in groups capable of both social memory and social inference.

Laura E. Grieneisen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A comparison of dominance rank metrics reveals multiple competitive landscapes in an Animal Society.
    Proceedings. Biological sciences, 2020
    Co-Authors: Emily J. Levy, Matthew N. Zipple, Emily Mclean, Fernando A. Campos, Mauna Dasari, Arielle S Fogel, Mathias Franz, Laurence R. Gesquiere, Jacob B. Gordon, Laura E. Grieneisen
    Abstract:

    Across group-living Animals, linear dominance hierarchies lead to disparities in access to resources, health outcomes and reproductive performance. Studies of how dominance rank predicts these traits typically employ one of several dominance rank metrics without examining the assumptions each metric makes about its underlying competitive processes. Here, we compare the ability of two dominance rank metrics-simple ordinal rank and proportional or ‘standardized’ rank-to predict 20 traits in a wild baboon population in Amboseli, Kenya. We propose that simple ordinal rank best predicts traits when competition is density-dependent, whereas proportional rank best predicts traits when competition is density-independent. We found that for 75% of traits (15/20), one rank metric performed better than the other. Strikingly, all male traits were best predicted by simple ordinal rank, whereas female traits were evenly split between proportional and simple ordinal rank. Hence, male and female traits are shaped by different competitive processes: males are largely driven by density-dependent resource access (e.g. access to oestrous females), whereas females are shaped by both density-independent (e.g. distributed food resources) and density-dependent resource access. This method of comparing how different rank metrics predict traits can be used to distinguish between different competitive processes operating in Animal societies.

  • Comparing proportional and ordinal dominance ranks reveals multiple competitive landscapes in an Animal Society
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Emily J. Levy, Matthew N. Zipple, Emily Mclean, Fernando A. Campos, Mauna Dasari, Arielle S Fogel, Mathias Franz, Laurence R. Gesquiere, Jacob B. Gordon, Laura E. Grieneisen
    Abstract:

    Across group-living Animals, linear dominance hierarchies lead to disparities in access to resources, health outcomes, and reproductive performance. Studies of how dominance rank affects these outcomes typically employ one of several dominance rank metrics without examining the assumptions each metric makes about its underlying competitive processes. Here we compare the ability of two dominance rank metrics – ordinal rank and proportional or 9standardized9 rank – to predict 20 distinct traits in a well-studied wild baboon population in Amboseli, Kenya. We propose that ordinal rank best predicts outcomes when competition is density-dependent, while proportional rank best predicts outcomes when competition is density-independent. We found that for 75% (15/20) of the traits, one of the two rank metrics performed better than the other. Strikingly, all male traits were better predicted by ordinal than by proportional rank, while female traits were evenly split between being better predicted by proportional or ordinal rank. Hence, male and female traits are shaped by different competitive regimes: males9 competitive environments are largely driven by density-dependent resource access (e.g., access to estrus females), while females9 competitive environments are shaped by both density-independent resource access (e.g. distributed food resources) and density-dependent resource access. However, traits related to competition for social and mating partners are an exception to this sex-biased pattern: these traits were better predicted by ordinal rank than by proportional rank for both sexes. We argue that this method of comparing how different rank metrics predict traits of interest can be used as a way to distinguish between different competitive processes operating in Animal societies.

Emily J. Levy – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A comparison of dominance rank metrics reveals multiple competitive landscapes in an Animal Society.
    Proceedings. Biological sciences, 2020
    Co-Authors: Emily J. Levy, Matthew N. Zipple, Emily Mclean, Fernando A. Campos, Mauna Dasari, Arielle S Fogel, Mathias Franz, Laurence R. Gesquiere, Jacob B. Gordon, Laura E. Grieneisen
    Abstract:

    Across group-living Animals, linear dominance hierarchies lead to disparities in access to resources, health outcomes and reproductive performance. Studies of how dominance rank predicts these traits typically employ one of several dominance rank metrics without examining the assumptions each metric makes about its underlying competitive processes. Here, we compare the ability of two dominance rank metrics-simple ordinal rank and proportional or ‘standardized’ rank-to predict 20 traits in a wild baboon population in Amboseli, Kenya. We propose that simple ordinal rank best predicts traits when competition is density-dependent, whereas proportional rank best predicts traits when competition is density-independent. We found that for 75% of traits (15/20), one rank metric performed better than the other. Strikingly, all male traits were best predicted by simple ordinal rank, whereas female traits were evenly split between proportional and simple ordinal rank. Hence, male and female traits are shaped by different competitive processes: males are largely driven by density-dependent resource access (e.g. access to oestrous females), whereas females are shaped by both density-independent (e.g. distributed food resources) and density-dependent resource access. This method of comparing how different rank metrics predict traits can be used to distinguish between different competitive processes operating in Animal societies.

  • Comparing proportional and ordinal dominance ranks reveals multiple competitive landscapes in an Animal Society
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Emily J. Levy, Matthew N. Zipple, Emily Mclean, Fernando A. Campos, Mauna Dasari, Arielle S Fogel, Mathias Franz, Laurence R. Gesquiere, Jacob B. Gordon, Laura E. Grieneisen
    Abstract:

    Across group-living Animals, linear dominance hierarchies lead to disparities in access to resources, health outcomes, and reproductive performance. Studies of how dominance rank affects these outcomes typically employ one of several dominance rank metrics without examining the assumptions each metric makes about its underlying competitive processes. Here we compare the ability of two dominance rank metrics – ordinal rank and proportional or 9standardized9 rank – to predict 20 distinct traits in a well-studied wild baboon population in Amboseli, Kenya. We propose that ordinal rank best predicts outcomes when competition is density-dependent, while proportional rank best predicts outcomes when competition is density-independent. We found that for 75% (15/20) of the traits, one of the two rank metrics performed better than the other. Strikingly, all male traits were better predicted by ordinal than by proportional rank, while female traits were evenly split between being better predicted by proportional or ordinal rank. Hence, male and female traits are shaped by different competitive regimes: males9 competitive environments are largely driven by density-dependent resource access (e.g., access to estrus females), while females9 competitive environments are shaped by both density-independent resource access (e.g. distributed food resources) and density-dependent resource access. However, traits related to competition for social and mating partners are an exception to this sex-biased pattern: these traits were better predicted by ordinal rank than by proportional rank for both sexes. We argue that this method of comparing how different rank metrics predict traits of interest can be used as a way to distinguish between different competitive processes operating in Animal societies.

Jennifer L Verdolin – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • prairie dogs communication and community in an Animal Society
    , 2009
    Co-Authors: C N Slobodchikoff, Bianca S Perla, Jennifer L Verdolin
    Abstract:

    * Preface *1. Prairie Dogs and the Big Picture *2. The Biology of Prairie Dogs * Interlude: Taxonomy and Prairie Dog Taxonomists *3. Social Behavior of Prairie Dogs * Interlude: Social Behavior–Trapping Prairie Dogs *4. Communication * Interlude: Communication *5. The Population Biology of Prairie Dogs *6. The Ecology of Prairie Dogs * Interlude: Vertebrate Species Associated with Prairie Dogs, by Richard Reading *7. Economics: How Much Is a Prairie Dog Worth? * Interlude: Prairie Dogs as Pets *8. Prairie Dog Conservation *9. Room to Hope * Appendix: Where to See Prairie Dogs * Bibliography * Index