Animal Stress - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Animal Stress

The Experts below are selected from a list of 93204 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Animal Stress – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

M.w.a. Verstegen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • fecal and salivary cortisol concentrations in woolly lagothrix ssp and spider monkeys ateles spp
    International Journal of Zoology, 2009
    Co-Authors: K Angevan D Heugten, S Timmer, G Bosch, A Elias, Scott Whisnant, H J M Swarts, P R Ferket, E Van Heugten, M.w.a. Verstegen

    Abstract:

    Detrimental physiological effects due to Stressors can contribute to the low captive success of primates. The objective of this research was to investigate the potential impact of diet composition on cortisol concentrations in feces and saliva in woolly () and spider monkeys (). The research was conducted in three studies: the first investigated spider monkeys in the United States, the second investigated spider monkeys within Europe, and the third investigated woolly monkeys within Europe. Fecal cortisol in spider monkeys in US zoos varied () from 30 to 66 ng/g. The zoo with the highest fecal cortisol also had the highest salivary cortisol (). For European zoos, fecal cortisol differed between zoos for both spider and woolly monkeys (). Spider monkeys had higher fecal cortisol than woolly monkeys (). Zoos with the highest dietary carbohydrates, sugars, glucose, and fruit had the highest cortisol. Cortisol was highest for zoos that did not meet crude protein requirements and fed the lowest percentage of complete feeds and crude fiber. Differences among zoos in housing and diets may increase Animal Stress. The lifespan and reproductive success of captive primates could improve if Stressors are reduced and dietary nutrients optimized.

  • fecal and salivary cortisol concentrations in woolly lagothrix ssp and spider monkeys ateles spp
    International Journal of Zoology, 2009
    Co-Authors: K Angevan D Heugten, E Van Heugten, S Timmer, G Bosch, A Elias, Scott Whisnant, H J M Swarts, P R Ferket, M.w.a. Verstegen

    Abstract:

    Detrimental physiological effects due to Stressors can contribute to the low captive success of primates. The objective of this research was to investigate the potential impact of diet composition on cortisol concentrations in feces and saliva in woolly () and spider monkeys (). The research was conducted in three studies: the first investigated spider monkeys in the United States, the second investigated spider monkeys within Europe, and the third investigated woolly monkeys within Europe. Fecal cortisol in spider monkeys in US zoos varied () from 30 to 66 ng/g. The zoo with the highest fecal cortisol also had the highest salivary cortisol (). For European zoos, fecal cortisol differed between zoos for both spider and woolly monkeys (). Spider monkeys had higher fecal cortisol than woolly monkeys (). Zoos with the highest dietary carbohydrates, sugars, glucose, and fruit had the highest cortisol. Cortisol was highest for zoos that did not meet crude protein requirements and fed the lowest percentage of complete feeds and crude fiber. Differences among zoos in housing and diets may increase Animal Stress. The lifespan and reproductive success of captive primates could improve if Stressors are reduced and dietary nutrients optimized.

  • Between-Animal variation in biological efficiency as related to residual feed consumption
    Netherlands Journal of Agricultural Science, 1994
    Co-Authors: P. Luiting, E.m. Urff, M.w.a. Verstegen

    Abstract:

    Production levels in livestock (cattle, pigs and poultry) have been increased considerably, with a correlated increase in gross feed efficiency. However, mature body weight has also increased, leading to higher maintenance costs. Thus, net feed efficiency has been little improved. Breeding for lower body weight has not been successful, but there are possibilities for reduction of feed consumption independent of production and body weight (residual feed consumption). It is as yet uncertain to what extent Animal Stress susceptibility will be affected by changes in residual feed consumption.

Larry D. Sanford – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Individual Differences in Animal Stress Models: Considering Resilience, Vulnerability, and the Amygdala in Mediating the Effects of Stress and Conditioned Fear on Sleep.
    Sleep, 2016
    Co-Authors: Laurie L. Wellman, Mairen E. Fitzpatrick, Olga Y. Hallum, Amy M. Sutton, Brook L. Williams, Larry D. Sanford

    Abstract:

    STUDY OBJECTIVES To examine the REM sleep response to Stress and fearful memories as a potential marker of Stress resilience and vulnerability and to assess the role of the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in mediating the effects of fear memory on sleep. METHODS Outbred Wistar rats were surgically implanted with electrodes for recording EEG and EMG and with bilateral guide cannulae directed at the BLA. Data loggers were placed intraperitoneally to record core body temperature. After recovery from surgery, the rats received shock training (ST: 20 footshocks, 0.8 mA, 0.5-s duration, 60-s interstimulus interval) and afterwards received microinjections of the GABAA agonist muscimol (MUS; 1.0 μM) to inactivate BLA or microinjections of vehicle (VEH) alone. Subsequently, the rats were separated into 4 groups (VEH-vulnerable (VEH-Vul; n = 14), VEH-resilient (VEH-Res; n = 13), MUS-vulnerable (MUS-Vul; n = 8), and MUS-resilient (MUS-Res; n = 11) based on whether or not REM was decreased, compared to baseline, during the first 4 h following ST. We then compared sleep, freezing, and the Stress response (Stress-induced hyperthermia, SIH) across groups to determine the effects of ST and fearful context re-exposure alone (CTX). RESULTS REM was significantly reduced on the ST day in both VEH-Vul and MUS-Vul rats; however, post-ST MUS blocked the reduction in REM on the CTX day in the MUS-Vul group. The VEH-Res and MUS-Res rats showed similar levels of REM on both ST and CTX days. The effects of post-ST inactivation of BLA on freezing and SIH were minimal. CONCLUSIONS Outbred Wistar rats can show significant individual differences in the effects of Stress on REM that are mediated by BLA. These differences in REM can be independent of behavioral fear and the peripheral Stress response, and may be an important biomarker of Stress resilience and vulnerability.

Gareth Arnott – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Evaluation of rumen temperature as a novel indicator of meat quality: Rumen temperature and haematological indicators of Stress during the pre-slaughter period as predictors of instrumental meat quality in bulls.
    Meat Science, 2019
    Co-Authors: Naomi Rutherford, Francis Lively, Gareth Arnott

    Abstract:

    Abstract The use of new technologies such as rumen temperature boluses, together with the collective assessment of an Animal Stress responses may have the potential to act as an indicator of meat quality. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate rumen temperature as a novel indicator of meat quality, by investigating its relationship with welfare measures and instrumental meat quality. The study involved 42 Holstein bulls (15.8 ± 0.08 months of age), which were transported 42 km to a commercial abattoir. Mean rumen temperature rose by 0.511 °C (P