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Ankle Sprain

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Jay Hertel – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • clinical assessment of acute lateral Ankle Sprain injuries roast 2019 consensus statement and recommendations of the international Ankle consortium
    British Journal of Sports Medicine, 2018
    Co-Authors: Eamonn Delahunt, Jay Hertel, Cailbhe Doherty, Brian Caulfield, Chris Bleakley, Daniela S Bossard, Carrie L Docherty, Francois Fourchet, Daniel T Fong, Claire E. Hiller

    Abstract:

    Lateral Ankle Sprain injury is the most common musculoskeletal injury incurred by individuals who participate in sports and recreational physical activities. Following initial injury, a high proportion of individuals develop long-term injury-associated symptoms and chronic Ankle instability. The development of chronic Ankle instability is consequent on the interaction of mechanical and sensorimotor insufficiencies/impairments that manifest following acute lateral Ankle Sprain injury. To reduce the propensity for developing chronic Ankle instability, clinical assessments should evaluate whether patients in the acute phase following lateral Ankle Sprain injury exhibit any mechanical and/or sensorimotor impairments. This modified Delphi study was undertaken under the auspices of the executive committee of the International Ankle Consortium. The primary aim was to develop recommendations, based on expert (n=14) consensus, for structured clinical assessment of acute lateral Ankle Sprain injuries. After two modified Delphi rounds, consensus was achieved on the clinical assessment of acute lateral Ankle Sprain injuries. Consensus was reached on a minimum standard clinical diagnostic assessment. Key components of this clinical diagnostic assessment include: establishing the mechanism of injury, as well as the assessment of Ankle joint bones and ligaments. Through consensus, the expert panel also developed the International Ankle Consortium Rehabilitation-Oriented ASsessmenT (ROAST). The International Ankle Consortium ROAST will help clinicians identify mechanical and/or sensorimotor impairments that are associated with chronic Ankle instability. This consensus statement from the International Ankle Consortium aims to be a key resource for clinicians who regularly assess individuals with acute lateral Ankle Sprain injuries.

  • current trends in the management of lateral Ankle Sprain in the united states
    Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, 2017
    Co-Authors: Mark A Feger, Neal R Glaviano, Luke Donovan, Joseph M Hart, Susan A Saliba, Joseph S Park, Jay Hertel

    Abstract:

    Objective:To characterize trends in the acute management (within 30 days) after lateral Ankle Sprain (LAS) in the United States.Design:Descriptive epidemiology study.Patients:Of note, 825 718 Ankle Sprain patients were identified; 96.2% were patients with LAS. Seven percent had an associated fractur

  • dynamic balance deficits in individuals with chronic Ankle instability compared to Ankle Sprain copers 1 year after a first time lateral Ankle Sprain injury
    Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy, 2016
    Co-Authors: Cailbhe Doherty, Jay Hertel, Chris Bleakley, Brian Caulfield, John Ryan, Eamonn Delahunt

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    To quantify the dynamic balance deficits that characterise a group with chronic Ankle instability compared to lateral Ankle Sprain copers and non-injured controls using kinematic and kinetic outcomes.

Eamonn Delahunt – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • criteria based return to sport decision making following lateral Ankle Sprain injury a systematic review and narrative synthesis
    Sports Medicine, 2019
    Co-Authors: Bruno Tassignon, Eamonn Delahunt, Evert Verhagen, Jo Verschueren, Michelle Smith, Bill Vicenzino, Romain Meeusen

    Abstract:

    The aim of this systematic review was to identify prospective studies that used a criteria-based return to sport (RTS) decision-making process for patients with lateral Ankle Sprain (LAS) injury. Systematic review and narrative synthesis. The PubMed (MEDLINE), Web of Science, PEDro, Cochrane Library, SPORTDiscus (EBSCO), ScienceDirect, and Scopus databases were searched to 23 November 2018. Studies were included if they prospectively applied a criteria-based RTS decision-making process for patients with LAS injury, but were excluded if they merely gathered outcome measures at the RTS time point. Studies were also excluded if patients were recovering from Ankle fracture, high Ankle Sprain, medial Ankle Sprain, chronic Ankle instability or complex Ankle injury. No studies were identified that used a criteria-based RTS decision-making process for patients with LAS injury. We were unable to conduct a quantitative synthesis or meta-analysis, therefore we provide a narrative synthesis of relevant questionnaires, as well as clinical and functional assessments commonly used in studies retrieved in the search. There are currently no published evidence-based criteria to inform RTS decisions for patients with an LAS injury. Based on our narrative synthesis, we propose a number of variables that could be used to develop a criteria-based RTS decision paradigm. Future research should aim to reach consensus on these variables and apply them to actual RTS decisions within prospective study designs. Furthermore, we suggest that complex systems theory and the RTS continuum could be used to inform the development of an RTS decision-making paradigm for athletes with LAS injury.

  • clinical assessment of acute lateral Ankle Sprain injuries roast 2019 consensus statement and recommendations of the international Ankle consortium
    British Journal of Sports Medicine, 2018
    Co-Authors: Eamonn Delahunt, Jay Hertel, Cailbhe Doherty, Brian Caulfield, Chris Bleakley, Daniela S Bossard, Carrie L Docherty, Francois Fourchet, Daniel T Fong, Claire E. Hiller

    Abstract:

    Lateral Ankle Sprain injury is the most common musculoskeletal injury incurred by individuals who participate in sports and recreational physical activities. Following initial injury, a high proportion of individuals develop long-term injury-associated symptoms and chronic Ankle instability. The development of chronic Ankle instability is consequent on the interaction of mechanical and sensorimotor insufficiencies/impairments that manifest following acute lateral Ankle Sprain injury. To reduce the propensity for developing chronic Ankle instability, clinical assessments should evaluate whether patients in the acute phase following lateral Ankle Sprain injury exhibit any mechanical and/or sensorimotor impairments. This modified Delphi study was undertaken under the auspices of the executive committee of the International Ankle Consortium. The primary aim was to develop recommendations, based on expert (n=14) consensus, for structured clinical assessment of acute lateral Ankle Sprain injuries. After two modified Delphi rounds, consensus was achieved on the clinical assessment of acute lateral Ankle Sprain injuries. Consensus was reached on a minimum standard clinical diagnostic assessment. Key components of this clinical diagnostic assessment include: establishing the mechanism of injury, as well as the assessment of Ankle joint bones and ligaments. Through consensus, the expert panel also developed the International Ankle Consortium Rehabilitation-Oriented ASsessmenT (ROAST). The International Ankle Consortium ROAST will help clinicians identify mechanical and/or sensorimotor impairments that are associated with chronic Ankle instability. This consensus statement from the International Ankle Consortium aims to be a key resource for clinicians who regularly assess individuals with acute lateral Ankle Sprain injuries.

  • treatment and prevention of acute and recurrent Ankle Sprain an overview of systematic reviews with meta analysis
    British Journal of Sports Medicine, 2017
    Co-Authors: Cailbhe Doherty, Eamonn Delahunt, Chris M Bleakley, Sinead Holden

    Abstract:

    Background Ankle Sprains are highly prevalent with high risk of recurrence. Consequently, there are a significant number of research reports examining strategies for treating and preventing acute and recurrent Sprains (otherwise known as chronic Ankle instability (CAI)), with a coinciding proliferation of review articles summarising these reports.

    Objective To provide a systematic overview of the systematic reviews evaluating treatment strategies for acute Ankle Sprain and CAI.

    Design Overview of intervention systematic reviews.

    Participants Individuals with acute Ankle Sprain/CAI.

    Main outcome measurements The primary outcomes were injury/reinjury incidence and function.

    Results 46 papers were included in this systematic review. The reviews had a mean score of 6.5/11 on the AMSTAR quality assessment tool. There was strong evidence for bracing and moderate evidence for neuromuscular training in preventing recurrence of an Ankle Sprain. For the combined outcomes of pain, swelling and function after an acute Sprain, there was strong evidence for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and early mobilisation, with moderate evidence supporting exercise and manual therapy techniques. There was conflicting evidence regarding the efficacy of surgery and acupuncture for the treatment of acute Ankle Sprains. There was insufficient evidence to support the use of ultrasound in the treatment of acute Ankle Sprains.

    Conclusions For the treatment of acute Ankle Sprain, there is strong evidence for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and early mobilisation, with moderate evidence supporting exercise and manual therapy techniques, for pain, swelling and function. Exercise therapy and bracing are supported in the prevention of CAI.

Cailbhe Doherty – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • clinical assessment of acute lateral Ankle Sprain injuries roast 2019 consensus statement and recommendations of the international Ankle consortium
    British Journal of Sports Medicine, 2018
    Co-Authors: Eamonn Delahunt, Jay Hertel, Cailbhe Doherty, Brian Caulfield, Chris Bleakley, Daniela S Bossard, Carrie L Docherty, Francois Fourchet, Daniel T Fong, Claire E. Hiller

    Abstract:

    Lateral Ankle Sprain injury is the most common musculoskeletal injury incurred by individuals who participate in sports and recreational physical activities. Following initial injury, a high proportion of individuals develop long-term injury-associated symptoms and chronic Ankle instability. The development of chronic Ankle instability is consequent on the interaction of mechanical and sensorimotor insufficiencies/impairments that manifest following acute lateral Ankle Sprain injury. To reduce the propensity for developing chronic Ankle instability, clinical assessments should evaluate whether patients in the acute phase following lateral Ankle Sprain injury exhibit any mechanical and/or sensorimotor impairments. This modified Delphi study was undertaken under the auspices of the executive committee of the International Ankle Consortium. The primary aim was to develop recommendations, based on expert (n=14) consensus, for structured clinical assessment of acute lateral Ankle Sprain injuries. After two modified Delphi rounds, consensus was achieved on the clinical assessment of acute lateral Ankle Sprain injuries. Consensus was reached on a minimum standard clinical diagnostic assessment. Key components of this clinical diagnostic assessment include: establishing the mechanism of injury, as well as the assessment of Ankle joint bones and ligaments. Through consensus, the expert panel also developed the International Ankle Consortium Rehabilitation-Oriented ASsessmenT (ROAST). The International Ankle Consortium ROAST will help clinicians identify mechanical and/or sensorimotor impairments that are associated with chronic Ankle instability. This consensus statement from the International Ankle Consortium aims to be a key resource for clinicians who regularly assess individuals with acute lateral Ankle Sprain injuries.

  • treatment and prevention of acute and recurrent Ankle Sprain an overview of systematic reviews with meta analysis
    British Journal of Sports Medicine, 2017
    Co-Authors: Cailbhe Doherty, Eamonn Delahunt, Chris M Bleakley, Sinead Holden

    Abstract:

    Background Ankle Sprains are highly prevalent with high risk of recurrence. Consequently, there are a significant number of research reports examining strategies for treating and preventing acute and recurrent Sprains (otherwise known as chronic Ankle instability (CAI)), with a coinciding proliferation of review articles summarising these reports.

    Objective To provide a systematic overview of the systematic reviews evaluating treatment strategies for acute Ankle Sprain and CAI.

    Design Overview of intervention systematic reviews.

    Participants Individuals with acute Ankle Sprain/CAI.

    Main outcome measurements The primary outcomes were injury/reinjury incidence and function.

    Results 46 papers were included in this systematic review. The reviews had a mean score of 6.5/11 on the AMSTAR quality assessment tool. There was strong evidence for bracing and moderate evidence for neuromuscular training in preventing recurrence of an Ankle Sprain. For the combined outcomes of pain, swelling and function after an acute Sprain, there was strong evidence for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and early mobilisation, with moderate evidence supporting exercise and manual therapy techniques. There was conflicting evidence regarding the efficacy of surgery and acupuncture for the treatment of acute Ankle Sprains. There was insufficient evidence to support the use of ultrasound in the treatment of acute Ankle Sprains.

    Conclusions For the treatment of acute Ankle Sprain, there is strong evidence for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and early mobilisation, with moderate evidence supporting exercise and manual therapy techniques, for pain, swelling and function. Exercise therapy and bracing are supported in the prevention of CAI.

  • dynamic balance deficits in individuals with chronic Ankle instability compared to Ankle Sprain copers 1 year after a first time lateral Ankle Sprain injury
    Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy, 2016
    Co-Authors: Cailbhe Doherty, Jay Hertel, Chris Bleakley, Brian Caulfield, John Ryan, Eamonn Delahunt

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    To quantify the dynamic balance deficits that characterise a group with chronic Ankle instability compared to lateral Ankle Sprain copers and non-injured controls using kinematic and kinetic outcomes.