Annihilation Gamma Ray - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Annihilation Gamma Ray

The Experts below are selected from a list of 11532 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Annihilation Gamma Ray – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Takashi Nakano – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Use of a Si/CdTe Compton Camera for In vivo Real-Time Monitoring of Annihilation Gamma Rays Generated by Carbon Ion Beam Irradiation.
    Frontiers in oncology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Shintaro Shiba, Raj Kumar Parajuli, Makoto Sakai, Takahiro Oike, Tatsuya Ohno, Takashi Nakano
    Abstract:

    The application of Annihilation GammaRay monitoring to the adaptive therapy of carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) requires identification of the peak intensity position and confirmation of activated elements with Annihilation GammaRays generated at the C-ion-irradiated site from those transported to unirradiated sites. Real-time monitoring of C-ion-induced Annihilation GammaRays was implemented using a Compton camera in a mouse model. An adult C57BL/6 mouse was anesthetized, and C-ion beams were directed into the abdomen at 1 × 109 particles/s for 20 s. The 511 keV Annihilation GammaRays, generated by the interaction between the irradiated C-ion beam and the target mouse, were detected using a silicon/cadmium telluride (Si/CdTe) Compton camera for 20 min immediately after irradiation. The irradiated site and the peak intensity position of 511 keV Gamma emissions due to C-ion beam irradiation on a mouse were observed at the abdomen of the mouse by developing Compton images. Moreover, the positron emitter transport was observed by evaluating the range of GammaRay emission after the C-ion beam irradiation on the mouse. Our data suggest that by confirming the peak intensity and beam range of C-ion RT with Si/CdTe-based Compton camera, it would be possible to reduce the intra-fractional and inter-fractional dose distribution degradation. Therefore, the results of this study would contribute to the future development of adaptive therapy with C-ion RT for humans.

  • Annihilation Gamma imaging for carbon ion beam range monitoring using Si/CdTe Compton camera.
    Physics in medicine and biology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Raj Kumar Parajuli, Makoto Sakai, Wataru Kada, Kota Torikai, Mikiko Kikuchi, Kazuo Arakawa, Masami Torikoshi, Takashi Nakano
    Abstract:

    In this study, we performed on-beam monitoring of 511 keV Annihilation Gamma emissions using a Compton camera. Beam monitoring experiments were conducted using carbon ion beams of 290 MeV/u irradiated on a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom. The intensity of the beams was 3  ×  109 particles per pulse, with 20 pulses per minute. A Compton camera based on a silicon/cadmium telluride (Si/CdTe) detector was used to monitor the Annihilation Gamma Rays emitted from the phantom. We successfully reconstructed the energy events of 511 keV Annihilation Gamma Rays and developed Compton images using a simple back-projection method. The distribution of the Annihilation Gamma Ray generation traced the beam trajectory and the peak intensity position was a few millimeters shorter than the Bragg peak position. Moreover, the effect of the beam range shifter with 30, 60, and 90 mm water equivalent thickness (WET) was clearly visualized in the reconstructed Compton images. The experimentally measured values of the corresponding range shifts in the PMMA phantom (28.70 mm, 52.49 mm, and 76.77 mm, respectively) were consistent with the shifts of the Bragg peak position (25.50 mm, 51.30 mm and 76.70 mm, respectively) evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation. The results show that the Si/CdTe Compton camera has strong potential for on-beam monitoring of Annihilation Gamma Rays in particle therapy in clinical situations.

Raj Kumar Parajuli – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Use of a Si/CdTe Compton Camera for In vivo Real-Time Monitoring of Annihilation Gamma Rays Generated by Carbon Ion Beam Irradiation.
    Frontiers in oncology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Shintaro Shiba, Raj Kumar Parajuli, Makoto Sakai, Takahiro Oike, Tatsuya Ohno, Takashi Nakano
    Abstract:

    The application of Annihilation GammaRay monitoring to the adaptive therapy of carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) requires identification of the peak intensity position and confirmation of activated elements with Annihilation GammaRays generated at the C-ion-irradiated site from those transported to unirradiated sites. Real-time monitoring of C-ion-induced Annihilation GammaRays was implemented using a Compton camera in a mouse model. An adult C57BL/6 mouse was anesthetized, and C-ion beams were directed into the abdomen at 1 × 109 particles/s for 20 s. The 511 keV Annihilation GammaRays, generated by the interaction between the irradiated C-ion beam and the target mouse, were detected using a silicon/cadmium telluride (Si/CdTe) Compton camera for 20 min immediately after irradiation. The irradiated site and the peak intensity position of 511 keV Gamma emissions due to C-ion beam irradiation on a mouse were observed at the abdomen of the mouse by developing Compton images. Moreover, the positron emitter transport was observed by evaluating the range of GammaRay emission after the C-ion beam irradiation on the mouse. Our data suggest that by confirming the peak intensity and beam range of C-ion RT with Si/CdTe-based Compton camera, it would be possible to reduce the intra-fractional and inter-fractional dose distribution degradation. Therefore, the results of this study would contribute to the future development of adaptive therapy with C-ion RT for humans.

  • Annihilation Gamma imaging for carbon ion beam range monitoring using Si/CdTe Compton camera.
    Physics in medicine and biology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Raj Kumar Parajuli, Makoto Sakai, Wataru Kada, Kota Torikai, Mikiko Kikuchi, Kazuo Arakawa, Masami Torikoshi, Takashi Nakano
    Abstract:

    In this study, we performed on-beam monitoring of 511 keV Annihilation Gamma emissions using a Compton camera. Beam monitoring experiments were conducted using carbon ion beams of 290 MeV/u irradiated on a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom. The intensity of the beams was 3  ×  109 particles per pulse, with 20 pulses per minute. A Compton camera based on a silicon/cadmium telluride (Si/CdTe) detector was used to monitor the Annihilation Gamma Rays emitted from the phantom. We successfully reconstructed the energy events of 511 keV Annihilation Gamma Rays and developed Compton images using a simple back-projection method. The distribution of the Annihilation Gamma Ray generation traced the beam trajectory and the peak intensity position was a few millimeters shorter than the Bragg peak position. Moreover, the effect of the beam range shifter with 30, 60, and 90 mm water equivalent thickness (WET) was clearly visualized in the reconstructed Compton images. The experimentally measured values of the corresponding range shifts in the PMMA phantom (28.70 mm, 52.49 mm, and 76.77 mm, respectively) were consistent with the shifts of the Bragg peak position (25.50 mm, 51.30 mm and 76.70 mm, respectively) evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation. The results show that the Si/CdTe Compton camera has strong potential for on-beam monitoring of Annihilation Gamma Rays in particle therapy in clinical situations.

Makoto Sakai – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Use of a Si/CdTe Compton Camera for In vivo Real-Time Monitoring of Annihilation Gamma Rays Generated by Carbon Ion Beam Irradiation.
    Frontiers in oncology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Shintaro Shiba, Raj Kumar Parajuli, Makoto Sakai, Takahiro Oike, Tatsuya Ohno, Takashi Nakano
    Abstract:

    The application of Annihilation GammaRay monitoring to the adaptive therapy of carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) requires identification of the peak intensity position and confirmation of activated elements with Annihilation GammaRays generated at the C-ion-irradiated site from those transported to unirradiated sites. Real-time monitoring of C-ion-induced Annihilation GammaRays was implemented using a Compton camera in a mouse model. An adult C57BL/6 mouse was anesthetized, and C-ion beams were directed into the abdomen at 1 × 109 particles/s for 20 s. The 511 keV Annihilation GammaRays, generated by the interaction between the irradiated C-ion beam and the target mouse, were detected using a silicon/cadmium telluride (Si/CdTe) Compton camera for 20 min immediately after irradiation. The irradiated site and the peak intensity position of 511 keV Gamma emissions due to C-ion beam irradiation on a mouse were observed at the abdomen of the mouse by developing Compton images. Moreover, the positron emitter transport was observed by evaluating the range of GammaRay emission after the C-ion beam irradiation on the mouse. Our data suggest that by confirming the peak intensity and beam range of C-ion RT with Si/CdTe-based Compton camera, it would be possible to reduce the intra-fractional and inter-fractional dose distribution degradation. Therefore, the results of this study would contribute to the future development of adaptive therapy with C-ion RT for humans.

  • Annihilation Gamma imaging for carbon ion beam range monitoring using Si/CdTe Compton camera.
    Physics in medicine and biology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Raj Kumar Parajuli, Makoto Sakai, Wataru Kada, Kota Torikai, Mikiko Kikuchi, Kazuo Arakawa, Masami Torikoshi, Takashi Nakano
    Abstract:

    In this study, we performed on-beam monitoring of 511 keV Annihilation Gamma emissions using a Compton camera. Beam monitoring experiments were conducted using carbon ion beams of 290 MeV/u irradiated on a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom. The intensity of the beams was 3  ×  109 particles per pulse, with 20 pulses per minute. A Compton camera based on a silicon/cadmium telluride (Si/CdTe) detector was used to monitor the Annihilation Gamma Rays emitted from the phantom. We successfully reconstructed the energy events of 511 keV Annihilation Gamma Rays and developed Compton images using a simple back-projection method. The distribution of the Annihilation Gamma Ray generation traced the beam trajectory and the peak intensity position was a few millimeters shorter than the Bragg peak position. Moreover, the effect of the beam range shifter with 30, 60, and 90 mm water equivalent thickness (WET) was clearly visualized in the reconstructed Compton images. The experimentally measured values of the corresponding range shifts in the PMMA phantom (28.70 mm, 52.49 mm, and 76.77 mm, respectively) were consistent with the shifts of the Bragg peak position (25.50 mm, 51.30 mm and 76.70 mm, respectively) evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation. The results show that the Si/CdTe Compton camera has strong potential for on-beam monitoring of Annihilation Gamma Rays in particle therapy in clinical situations.