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Antenatal Steroid

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Manuel Durand – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • respiratory compliance in late preterm infants 340 7 346 7 weeks after Antenatal Steroid therapy
    The Journal of Pediatrics, 2018
    Co-Authors: Mitzi Go, Manuel Durand, Diane Schilling, Thuan Nguyen, Cindy T Mcevoy

    Abstract:

    Objective To compare respiratory compliance in late preterm infants (340/7-346/7 weeks) who received Antenatal Steroids vs matched late preterm infants who did not receive Antenatal Steroids. Study design This was a single-center prospective cohort study. Patients were matched for birth weight, gestational age, race, and sex. Respiratory compliance was the primary outcome measured with the single breath occlusion technique. Results We studied 25 late preterm infants treated with Antenatal Steroids and 25 matched infants who did not receive Antenatal Steroids. The treated infants had a significantly increased respiratory compliance/kg (adjusted 95% CI 0.05, 0.49; P = .016) and fewer required continuous positive airway pressure (P = .007) or >24 hours of supplemental oxygen (P = .046). There was no difference in surfactant therapy. Conclusions Respiratory compliance was significantly increased in this cohort of late preterm infants born at 340/7-346/7 weeks who received Antenatal Steroids compared with matched infants who did not receive Antenatal Steroids. Although not randomized, these data provide physiologic support for the possible beneficial effects of Antenatal Steroids in late preterm infants.

  • Respiratory Compliance in Late Preterm Infants (340/7-346/7 Weeks) after Antenatal Steroid Therapy
    The Journal of Pediatrics, 2018
    Co-Authors: Mitzi Go, Manuel Durand, Diane Schilling, Thuan Nguyen, Cindy T Mcevoy

    Abstract:

    Objective To compare respiratory compliance in late preterm infants (340/7-346/7 weeks) who received Antenatal Steroids vs matched late preterm infants who did not receive Antenatal Steroids. Study design This was a single-center prospective cohort study. Patients were matched for birth weight, gestational age, race, and sex. Respiratory compliance was the primary outcome measured with the single breath occlusion technique. Results We studied 25 late preterm infants treated with Antenatal Steroids and 25 matched infants who did not receive Antenatal Steroids. The treated infants had a significantly increased respiratory compliance/kg (adjusted 95% CI 0.05, 0.49; P = .016) and fewer required continuous positive airway pressure (P = .007) or >24 hours of supplemental oxygen (P = .046). There was no difference in surfactant therapy. Conclusions Respiratory compliance was significantly increased in this cohort of late preterm infants born at 340/7-346/7 weeks who received Antenatal Steroids compared with matched infants who did not receive Antenatal Steroids. Although not randomized, these data provide physiologic support for the possible beneficial effects of Antenatal Steroids in late preterm infants.

  • decreased respiratory compliance in infants less than or equal to 32 weeks gestation delivered more than 7 days after Antenatal Steroid therapy
    Pediatrics, 2008
    Co-Authors: C Mcevoy, Diane Schilling, Patricia Spitale, Dawn Peters, Jean P Omalley, Manuel Durand

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVES. Our objective was to compare the pulmonary function (respiratory compliance) of infants who were ≤32 weeks9 gestation and delivered >7 days after a single course of Antenatal Steroids versus infants who were delivered 1 to 7 days after a single course of Antenatal Steroids. METHODS. A prospective cohort study of respiratory system compliance was conducted of infants ≤32 weeks9 gestation within 72 hours of life and before surfactant therapy if needed. The study (remote) group was composed of infants who were treated with Antenatal Steroids >7 days before delivery and the comparison group (ideal group) of matched infants who were treated with Antenatal Steroids 1 to 7 days before delivery. Respiratory system compliance was measured with the single-breath occlusion technique. RESULTS. Twenty-eight remotely treated infants and 28 ideally treated infants were studied. The remote group had a significantly lower respiratory system compliance per kilogram and total respiratory system compliance when compared with the ideal Antenatal Steroids group. Within the remote group, infants who received Antenatal Steroids 8 to 14 days (n = 10) before delivery had a significantly higher respiratory system compliance and a trend to less surfactant need (10% vs 33%) as compared with infants who received Antenatal Steroids >14 days (n = 18) before delivery. CONCLUSIONS. Infants who were ≤32 weeks9 gestation and remotely treated with Antenatal Steroids (average 21 days) had a significantly lower respiratory compliance compared with matched infants who were ideally treated with Antenatal Steroids. We speculate that the lower respiratory system compliance may reflect the dissipation of beneficial effects of Antenatal Steroids on pulmonary function when delivery occurs >7 days after therapy and particularly when therapy is >14 days before delivery.

Cindy T Mcevoy – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • respiratory compliance in late preterm infants 340 7 346 7 weeks after Antenatal Steroid therapy
    The Journal of Pediatrics, 2018
    Co-Authors: Mitzi Go, Manuel Durand, Diane Schilling, Thuan Nguyen, Cindy T Mcevoy

    Abstract:

    Objective To compare respiratory compliance in late preterm infants (340/7-346/7 weeks) who received Antenatal Steroids vs matched late preterm infants who did not receive Antenatal Steroids. Study design This was a single-center prospective cohort study. Patients were matched for birth weight, gestational age, race, and sex. Respiratory compliance was the primary outcome measured with the single breath occlusion technique. Results We studied 25 late preterm infants treated with Antenatal Steroids and 25 matched infants who did not receive Antenatal Steroids. The treated infants had a significantly increased respiratory compliance/kg (adjusted 95% CI 0.05, 0.49; P = .016) and fewer required continuous positive airway pressure (P = .007) or >24 hours of supplemental oxygen (P = .046). There was no difference in surfactant therapy. Conclusions Respiratory compliance was significantly increased in this cohort of late preterm infants born at 340/7-346/7 weeks who received Antenatal Steroids compared with matched infants who did not receive Antenatal Steroids. Although not randomized, these data provide physiologic support for the possible beneficial effects of Antenatal Steroids in late preterm infants.

  • Respiratory Compliance in Late Preterm Infants (340/7-346/7 Weeks) after Antenatal Steroid Therapy
    The Journal of Pediatrics, 2018
    Co-Authors: Mitzi Go, Manuel Durand, Diane Schilling, Thuan Nguyen, Cindy T Mcevoy

    Abstract:

    Objective To compare respiratory compliance in late preterm infants (340/7-346/7 weeks) who received Antenatal Steroids vs matched late preterm infants who did not receive Antenatal Steroids. Study design This was a single-center prospective cohort study. Patients were matched for birth weight, gestational age, race, and sex. Respiratory compliance was the primary outcome measured with the single breath occlusion technique. Results We studied 25 late preterm infants treated with Antenatal Steroids and 25 matched infants who did not receive Antenatal Steroids. The treated infants had a significantly increased respiratory compliance/kg (adjusted 95% CI 0.05, 0.49; P = .016) and fewer required continuous positive airway pressure (P = .007) or >24 hours of supplemental oxygen (P = .046). There was no difference in surfactant therapy. Conclusions Respiratory compliance was significantly increased in this cohort of late preterm infants born at 340/7-346/7 weeks who received Antenatal Steroids compared with matched infants who did not receive Antenatal Steroids. Although not randomized, these data provide physiologic support for the possible beneficial effects of Antenatal Steroids in late preterm infants.

  • The window of improved neonatal respiratory compliance after rescue Antenatal Steroids
    Journal of Perinatology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Brian K. Jordan, Diane Schilling, Cindy T Mcevoy

    Abstract:

    To evaluate whether premature infants delivered ≤7 days after rescue Antenatal Steroid treatment (ideal treatment) have increased passive respiratory compliance compared to those delivered >7 days after treatment (remote treatment). Secondary analysis of a randomized trial of rescue Antenatal Steroids on respiratory compliance. Infants in the treatment group were stratified by the interval between rescue Antenatal Steroids and delivery. We then compared the respiratory compliance in the ideal vs. remote groups. Forty-four women (56 infants) received rescue Antenatal Steroids. Forty-nine infants had evaluable respiratory compliance measurements, with 27 (GA 30.1 weeks, BW 1362 g) “ideally” treated, and 22 (GA 33.8 weeks, BW 2248 g) “remotely” treated. Respiratory compliance was significantly higher for the ideal compared to the remote group (1.32 vs. 1.06 mL/cm H2O/kg; p = 0.037). Infants treated with rescue Antenatal Steroids have a significantly higher respiratory compliance if delivery occurs within 7 days after treatment.

Diane Schilling – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • respiratory compliance in late preterm infants 340 7 346 7 weeks after Antenatal Steroid therapy
    The Journal of Pediatrics, 2018
    Co-Authors: Mitzi Go, Manuel Durand, Diane Schilling, Thuan Nguyen, Cindy T Mcevoy

    Abstract:

    Objective To compare respiratory compliance in late preterm infants (340/7-346/7 weeks) who received Antenatal Steroids vs matched late preterm infants who did not receive Antenatal Steroids. Study design This was a single-center prospective cohort study. Patients were matched for birth weight, gestational age, race, and sex. Respiratory compliance was the primary outcome measured with the single breath occlusion technique. Results We studied 25 late preterm infants treated with Antenatal Steroids and 25 matched infants who did not receive Antenatal Steroids. The treated infants had a significantly increased respiratory compliance/kg (adjusted 95% CI 0.05, 0.49; P = .016) and fewer required continuous positive airway pressure (P = .007) or >24 hours of supplemental oxygen (P = .046). There was no difference in surfactant therapy. Conclusions Respiratory compliance was significantly increased in this cohort of late preterm infants born at 340/7-346/7 weeks who received Antenatal Steroids compared with matched infants who did not receive Antenatal Steroids. Although not randomized, these data provide physiologic support for the possible beneficial effects of Antenatal Steroids in late preterm infants.

  • Respiratory Compliance in Late Preterm Infants (340/7-346/7 Weeks) after Antenatal Steroid Therapy
    The Journal of Pediatrics, 2018
    Co-Authors: Mitzi Go, Manuel Durand, Diane Schilling, Thuan Nguyen, Cindy T Mcevoy

    Abstract:

    Objective To compare respiratory compliance in late preterm infants (340/7-346/7 weeks) who received Antenatal Steroids vs matched late preterm infants who did not receive Antenatal Steroids. Study design This was a single-center prospective cohort study. Patients were matched for birth weight, gestational age, race, and sex. Respiratory compliance was the primary outcome measured with the single breath occlusion technique. Results We studied 25 late preterm infants treated with Antenatal Steroids and 25 matched infants who did not receive Antenatal Steroids. The treated infants had a significantly increased respiratory compliance/kg (adjusted 95% CI 0.05, 0.49; P = .016) and fewer required continuous positive airway pressure (P = .007) or >24 hours of supplemental oxygen (P = .046). There was no difference in surfactant therapy. Conclusions Respiratory compliance was significantly increased in this cohort of late preterm infants born at 340/7-346/7 weeks who received Antenatal Steroids compared with matched infants who did not receive Antenatal Steroids. Although not randomized, these data provide physiologic support for the possible beneficial effects of Antenatal Steroids in late preterm infants.

  • The window of improved neonatal respiratory compliance after rescue Antenatal Steroids
    Journal of Perinatology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Brian K. Jordan, Diane Schilling, Cindy T Mcevoy

    Abstract:

    To evaluate whether premature infants delivered ≤7 days after rescue Antenatal Steroid treatment (ideal treatment) have increased passive respiratory compliance compared to those delivered >7 days after treatment (remote treatment). Secondary analysis of a randomized trial of rescue Antenatal Steroids on respiratory compliance. Infants in the treatment group were stratified by the interval between rescue Antenatal Steroids and delivery. We then compared the respiratory compliance in the ideal vs. remote groups. Forty-four women (56 infants) received rescue Antenatal Steroids. Forty-nine infants had evaluable respiratory compliance measurements, with 27 (GA 30.1 weeks, BW 1362 g) “ideally” treated, and 22 (GA 33.8 weeks, BW 2248 g) “remotely” treated. Respiratory compliance was significantly higher for the ideal compared to the remote group (1.32 vs. 1.06 mL/cm H2O/kg; p = 0.037). Infants treated with rescue Antenatal Steroids have a significantly higher respiratory compliance if delivery occurs within 7 days after treatment.