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Haruhiko Itagaki – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the olfactory responses of the antenna and maxillary palp of the fleshfly neobellieria bullata diptera sarcophagidae and their sensitivity to blockage of nitric oxide synthase
    Journal of Insect Physiology, 2003
    Co-Authors: S L Wasserman, Haruhiko Itagaki

    Abstract:

    The relative sensitivities of the olfactory receptors in the antenna and maxillary palp of the fleshfly, Neobellieria bullata, were assessed using simultaneous electroantennograms (EAGs) and electropalpograms (EPGs). In general, the Antennae and maxillary palps were more sensitive to odors related to animals (blood extract and saturated carboxylic acid) than to odors that were plantderived (citral, hexenol, hexenal). In addition, the maxillary palps were relatively less sensitive to plant-derived odorants than the Antennae, perhaps related to their anatomical position. Scanning electron microscopy was also used to assess the types of sensilla found on the two organs. In addition, NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry was used in an attempt to localize the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the antenna and the maxillary palps. We found evidence of NADPH-diaphorase staining in both organs, with localized staining in the antennal cells and more general staining in the maxillary palps. When NOS was selectively blocked using the antagonist L-NAME, the amplitude of the EAGs and EPGs to odorants fell by 30–50%. In contrast, application of the inactive enantiomer, D-NAME, did not change the amplitude of the EAGs or the EPGs. Our results indicate that NOS is involved in the function of olfactory receptor cells in the fleshfly.  2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • The olfactory responses of the antenna and maxillary palp of the fleshfly, Neobellieria bullata (Diptera: Sarcophagidae), and their sensitivity to blockage of nitric oxide synthase
    Journal of insect physiology, 2003
    Co-Authors: S L Wasserman, Haruhiko Itagaki

    Abstract:

    The relative sensitivities of the olfactory receptors in the antenna and maxillary palp of the fleshfly, Neobellieria bullata, were assessed using simultaneous electroantennograms (EAGs) and electropalpograms (EPGs). In general, the Antennae and maxillary palps were more sensitive to odors related to animals (blood extract and saturated carboxylic acid) than to odors that were plant-derived (citral, hexenol, hexenal). In addition, the maxillary palps were relatively less sensitive to plant-derived odorants than the Antennae, perhaps related to their anatomical position. Scanning electron microscopy was also used to assess the types of sensilla found on the two organs. In addition, NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry was used in an attempt to localize the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the antenna and the maxillary palps. We found evidence of NADPH-diaphorase staining in both organs, with localized staining in the antennal cells and more general staining in the maxillary palps. When NOS was selectively blocked using the antagonist L-NAME, the amplitude of the EAGs and EPGs to odorants fell by 30-50%. In contrast, application of the inactive enantiomer, D-NAME, did not change the amplitude of the EAGs or the EPGs. Our results indicate that NOS is involved in the function of olfactory receptor cells in the fleshfly.

S L Wasserman – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the olfactory responses of the antenna and maxillary palp of the fleshfly neobellieria bullata diptera sarcophagidae and their sensitivity to blockage of nitric oxide synthase
    Journal of Insect Physiology, 2003
    Co-Authors: S L Wasserman, Haruhiko Itagaki

    Abstract:

    The relative sensitivities of the olfactory receptors in the antenna and maxillary palp of the fleshfly, Neobellieria bullata, were assessed using simultaneous electroantennograms (EAGs) and electropalpograms (EPGs). In general, the Antennae and maxillary palps were more sensitive to odors related to animals (blood extract and saturated carboxylic acid) than to odors that were plantderived (citral, hexenol, hexenal). In addition, the maxillary palps were relatively less sensitive to plant-derived odorants than the Antennae, perhaps related to their anatomical position. Scanning electron microscopy was also used to assess the types of sensilla found on the two organs. In addition, NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry was used in an attempt to localize the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the antenna and the maxillary palps. We found evidence of NADPH-diaphorase staining in both organs, with localized staining in the antennal cells and more general staining in the maxillary palps. When NOS was selectively blocked using the antagonist L-NAME, the amplitude of the EAGs and EPGs to odorants fell by 30–50%. In contrast, application of the inactive enantiomer, D-NAME, did not change the amplitude of the EAGs or the EPGs. Our results indicate that NOS is involved in the function of olfactory receptor cells in the fleshfly.  2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • The olfactory responses of the antenna and maxillary palp of the fleshfly, Neobellieria bullata (Diptera: Sarcophagidae), and their sensitivity to blockage of nitric oxide synthase
    Journal of insect physiology, 2003
    Co-Authors: S L Wasserman, Haruhiko Itagaki

    Abstract:

    The relative sensitivities of the olfactory receptors in the antenna and maxillary palp of the fleshfly, Neobellieria bullata, were assessed using simultaneous electroantennograms (EAGs) and electropalpograms (EPGs). In general, the Antennae and maxillary palps were more sensitive to odors related to animals (blood extract and saturated carboxylic acid) than to odors that were plant-derived (citral, hexenol, hexenal). In addition, the maxillary palps were relatively less sensitive to plant-derived odorants than the Antennae, perhaps related to their anatomical position. Scanning electron microscopy was also used to assess the types of sensilla found on the two organs. In addition, NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry was used in an attempt to localize the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the antenna and the maxillary palps. We found evidence of NADPH-diaphorase staining in both organs, with localized staining in the antennal cells and more general staining in the maxillary palps. When NOS was selectively blocked using the antagonist L-NAME, the amplitude of the EAGs and EPGs to odorants fell by 30-50%. In contrast, application of the inactive enantiomer, D-NAME, did not change the amplitude of the EAGs or the EPGs. Our results indicate that NOS is involved in the function of olfactory receptor cells in the fleshfly.

Mark A. Willis – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • One antenna, two Antennae, big Antennae, small: total Antennae length, not bilateral symmetry, predicts odor-tracking performance in the American cockroach Periplaneta americana.
    Journal of Experimental Biology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Jacob K. Lockey, Mark A. Willis

    Abstract:

    Determining the location of a particular stimulus is often crucial to an animal9s survival. One way to determine the local distribution of odor is to make simultaneous comparisons across multiple sensors. If the sensors detect differences in the distribution of odor in space, the animal can then steer toward the source. American cockroaches, Periplaneta americana , have 4 cm long Antennae and are thought to track odor plumes using a spatial sampling strategy, comparing the amount of odor detected between these bilateral sensors. However, it is not uncommon for cockroaches to lose parts of their Antennae and still track a wind-borne odor to its source. We examined whether bilateral odor input is necessary to locate an odor source in a wind-driven environment and how the loss of increasing lengths of the Antennae affects odor tracking. The tracking performances of individuals with two bilaterally-symmetrical Antennae of decreasing length were compared to antennal length-matched individuals with one antenna. Cockroaches with one antenna were generally able to track an odor plume to its source. In fact, the performances of unilaterally antennectomized individuals were statistically identical to their bilaterally symmetrical counterparts when the total length of both Antennae equaled the length of the single antenna of the antennectomized individuals. This suggests that the total length of available Antennae influences odor tracking performance more than any specific piece of antenna, and that they may be doing something more complex than a simple bilateral comparison between their Antennae. The possibility of an antenna-topic map is discussed.

  • One antenna, two Antennae, big Antennae, small: total Antennae length, not bilateral symmetry, predicts odor-tracking performance in the American cockroach Periplaneta americana.
    The Journal of experimental biology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Jacob K. Lockey, Mark A. Willis

    Abstract:

    Determining the location of a particular stimulus is often crucial to an animal’s survival. One way to determine the local distribution of an odor is to make simultaneous comparisons across multiple sensors. If the sensors detect differences in the distribution of an odor in space, the animal can then steer toward the source. American cockroaches, Periplaneta americana, have 4 cm long Antennae and are thought to track odor plumes using a spatial sampling strategy, comparing the amount of odor detected between these bilateral sensors. However, it is not uncommon for cockroaches to lose parts of their Antennae and still track a wind-borne odor to its source. We examined whether bilateral odor input is necessary to locate an odor source in a wind-driven environment and how the loss of increasing lengths of the Antennae affects odor tracking. The tracking performances of individuals with two bilaterally symmetrical Antennae of decreasing length were compared with antennal length-matched individuals with one antenna. Cockroaches with one antenna were generally able to track an odor plume to its source. In fact, the performances of unilaterally antennectomized individuals were statistically identical to those of their bilaterally symmetrical counterparts when the combined length of both Antennae equaled the length of the single antenna of the antennectomized individuals. This suggests that the total length of available Antennae influences odor tracking performance more than any specific piece of antenna, and that they may be doing something more complex than a simple bilateral comparison between their Antennae. The possibility of an antenna-topic map is discussed.