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Antepartum Hemorrhage

The Experts below are selected from a list of 285 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

William W. K. To – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Antepartum Hemorrhage of unknown origin–what is its clinical significance?
    Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 1999
    Co-Authors: Carina C.w. Chan, William W. K. To

    Abstract:

    Background. Antepartum Hemorrhage of unknown origin is a common antenatal complication, accounting for more than half of the cases of Antepartum Hemorrhage. Few investigators had reported the importance of this condition and the proper management. Method. The present study reviewed retrospectively 718 cases with singleton pregnancies diagnosed as having Antepartum Hemorrhage of unknown origin after 24 weeks from 1991 to 1996 and compared their pregnancy outcomes with controls who delivered during the same period of time as the study cases. Clinical and ultrasound examinations were performed in all recruited cases to exclude accidental Hemorrhage, placenta previa or lower genital tract bleeding. Results. Patients with Antepartum Hemorrhage of unknown origin ran a higher risk of spontaneous preterm labor (p

  • Antepartum Hemorrhage of unknown origin what is its clinical significance
    Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 1999
    Co-Authors: Carina C.w. Chan, William W. K. To

    Abstract:

    Background. Antepartum Hemorrhage of unknown origin is a common antenatal complication, accounting for more than half of the cases of Antepartum Hemorrhage. Few investigators had reported the importance of this condition and the proper management. Method. The present study reviewed retrospectively 718 cases with singleton pregnancies diagnosed as having Antepartum Hemorrhage of unknown origin after 24 weeks from 1991 to 1996 and compared their pregnancy outcomes with controls who delivered during the same period of time as the study cases. Clinical and ultrasound examinations were performed in all recruited cases to exclude accidental Hemorrhage, placenta previa or lower genital tract bleeding. Results. Patients with Antepartum Hemorrhage of unknown origin ran a higher risk of spontaneous preterm labor (p<0.001). The birthweight, when adjusted for gestation, did not differ between the two groups. Labor induction rate and cesarean section rates were significantly higher in the Antepartum Hemorrhage group. The incidences of major Antepartum complications and neonatal complications did not differ between the two groups. There were more babies with congenital abnormalities in the Antepartum Hemorrhage group (p<0.001) and perinatal mortality rate was also higher, though this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion. The main fetal risks associated with Antepartum Hemorrhage of unknown origin is preterm labor and its subsequent fetal complications. A small but significant proportion of these pregnancies might be associated with fetal congenital abnormalities. Routine induction at term for this group of patients is of questionable value as adverse fetal outcomes are mostly associated with those that delivered prematurely, or with babies with congenital malformations. When gross fetal abnormalities could be reasonably excluded, labor induction at term should only be contemplated in the presence of other obstetric indications.

Carina C.w. Chan – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Antepartum Hemorrhage of unknown origin–what is its clinical significance?
    Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 1999
    Co-Authors: Carina C.w. Chan, William W. K. To

    Abstract:

    Background. Antepartum Hemorrhage of unknown origin is a common antenatal complication, accounting for more than half of the cases of Antepartum Hemorrhage. Few investigators had reported the importance of this condition and the proper management. Method. The present study reviewed retrospectively 718 cases with singleton pregnancies diagnosed as having Antepartum Hemorrhage of unknown origin after 24 weeks from 1991 to 1996 and compared their pregnancy outcomes with controls who delivered during the same period of time as the study cases. Clinical and ultrasound examinations were performed in all recruited cases to exclude accidental Hemorrhage, placenta previa or lower genital tract bleeding. Results. Patients with Antepartum Hemorrhage of unknown origin ran a higher risk of spontaneous preterm labor (p

  • Antepartum Hemorrhage of unknown origin what is its clinical significance
    Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 1999
    Co-Authors: Carina C.w. Chan, William W. K. To

    Abstract:

    Background. Antepartum Hemorrhage of unknown origin is a common antenatal complication, accounting for more than half of the cases of Antepartum Hemorrhage. Few investigators had reported the importance of this condition and the proper management. Method. The present study reviewed retrospectively 718 cases with singleton pregnancies diagnosed as having Antepartum Hemorrhage of unknown origin after 24 weeks from 1991 to 1996 and compared their pregnancy outcomes with controls who delivered during the same period of time as the study cases. Clinical and ultrasound examinations were performed in all recruited cases to exclude accidental Hemorrhage, placenta previa or lower genital tract bleeding. Results. Patients with Antepartum Hemorrhage of unknown origin ran a higher risk of spontaneous preterm labor (p<0.001). The birthweight, when adjusted for gestation, did not differ between the two groups. Labor induction rate and cesarean section rates were significantly higher in the Antepartum Hemorrhage group. The incidences of major Antepartum complications and neonatal complications did not differ between the two groups. There were more babies with congenital abnormalities in the Antepartum Hemorrhage group (p<0.001) and perinatal mortality rate was also higher, though this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion. The main fetal risks associated with Antepartum Hemorrhage of unknown origin is preterm labor and its subsequent fetal complications. A small but significant proportion of these pregnancies might be associated with fetal congenital abnormalities. Routine induction at term for this group of patients is of questionable value as adverse fetal outcomes are mostly associated with those that delivered prematurely, or with babies with congenital malformations. When gross fetal abnormalities could be reasonably excluded, labor induction at term should only be contemplated in the presence of other obstetric indications.

Brian Reichman – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Antepartum Hemorrhage and outcome of very low birth weight very preterm infants a population based study
    American Journal of Perinatology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Gil Klinger, Brian Reichman, Reuben Bromiker, Inna Zaslavskypaltiel, Nir Sokolover, Liat Lernergeva, Yariv Yogev

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE:  We aimed to determine the independent effect of maternal Antepartum Hemorrhage (APH) on mortality and major neonatal morbidities among very low birth weight (VLBW), very preterm infants. STUDY DESIGN:  A population-based cohort study of VLBW singleton infants born at 24 to 31 weeks of gestation between 1995 and 2016 was performed. Infants born with the following pregnancy associated complications were excluded: maternal hypertensive disorders, prolonged rupture of membranes, amnionitis, maternal diabetes, and small for gestational age. APH included Hemorrhage due to either placenta previa or placental abruption. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the effect of maternal APH on mortality and major neonatal morbidities. RESULTS:  The initial cohort included 33,627 VLBW infants. Following exclusions, the final study population comprised 6,235 infants of whom 2,006 (32.2%) were born following APH and 4,229 (67.8%) without APH. In the APH versus no APH group, there were higher rates of extreme prematurity (24-27 weeks of gestation; 51.6% vs. 45.3%, p < 0.0001), mortality (20.2 vs. 18.5%, p = 0.011), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD, 16.1 vs. 13.0%, p = 0.004) and death or adverse neurologic outcome (37.4 vs. 34.5%, p = 0.03). In the multivariable analyses, APH was associated with significantly increased odds ratio (OR) for BPD in the extremely preterm infants (OR: 1.31, 95% confidence interval: 1.05-1.65). The OR's for mortality, adverse neurological outcomes, and death or adverse neurological outcome were not significantly increased in the APH group. CONCLUSION:  Among singleton, very preterm VLBW infants, maternal APH was associated with increased odds for BPD only in extremely premature infants, but was not associated with excess mortality or adverse neonatal neurological outcomes. KEY POINTS: · Outcome of very low birth weight infants born after Antepartum Hemorrhage (APH) was assessed.. · APH was not associated with higher infant mortality.. · APH was not associated with adverse neurological outcome.. · APH was associated with increased bronchopulmonary dysplasia in extremely preterm infants..

  • Antepartum Hemorrhage and Outcome of Very Low Birth Weight, Very Preterm Infants: A Population-Based Study.
    American Journal of Perinatology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Gil Klinger, Reuben Bromiker, Nir Sokolover, Yariv Yogev, Inna Zaslavsky-paltiel, Liat Lerner-geva, Brian Reichman

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE:  We aimed to determine the independent effect of maternal Antepartum Hemorrhage (APH) on mortality and major neonatal morbidities among very low birth weight (VLBW), very preterm infants. STUDY DESIGN:  A population-based cohort study of VLBW singleton infants born at 24 to 31 weeks of gestation between 1995 and 2016 was performed. Infants born with the following pregnancy associated complications were excluded: maternal hypertensive disorders, prolonged rupture of membranes, amnionitis, maternal diabetes, and small for gestational age. APH included Hemorrhage due to either placenta previa or placental abruption. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the effect of maternal APH on mortality and major neonatal morbidities. RESULTS:  The initial cohort included 33,627 VLBW infants. Following exclusions, the final study population comprised 6,235 infants of whom 2,006 (32.2%) were born following APH and 4,229 (67.8%) without APH. In the APH versus no APH group, there were higher rates of extreme prematurity (24-27 weeks of gestation; 51.6% vs. 45.3%, p