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Isabel M.p.l.v.o. Ferreira – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Degradation of Anthocyanins and Anthocyanidins in Blueberry Jams/Stuffed Fish
    Journal of agricultural and food chemistry, 2009
    Co-Authors: Filipa Queiroz, Carla Oliveira, Olívia Pinho, Isabel M.p.l.v.o. Ferreira

    Abstract:

    This study examined the effects of cooking on the degradation of anthocyanins and Anthocyanidins of blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) from cultivar Bluecrop. Fruits were used to prepare jams with different °Brix and stuffed fish. A systematic evaluation of the degradation of anthocyanins and Anthocyanidins of blueberries was performed; for that purpose an HPLC/DAD method was used to determine anthocyanin profile and anthocyanidin contents in fresh and cooked blueberries and in jams. Ten anthocyanins were separated and monitored in methanolic extracts. Of the six common Anthocyanidins, four were identified in the hydrolysates, namely, delphinidin, cyanidin, petunidin and malvidin. Percentage of degradation of anthocyanins and Anthocyanidins in jams is highly dependent on °Brix: 64−76 °Brix led to 20−30% degradation, whereas 80 °Brix resulted in degradation between 50 and 60%. Percentage of degradation of anthocyanins in whole blueberries cooked in stuffed fish ranged between 45 and 50%, however, for an…

  • degradation of anthocyanins and Anthocyanidins in blueberry jams stuffed fish
    Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 2009
    Co-Authors: Filipa Queiroz, Carla Oliveira, Olívia Pinho, Isabel M.p.l.v.o. Ferreira

    Abstract:

    This study examined the effects of cooking on the degradation of anthocyanins and Anthocyanidins of blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) from cultivar Bluecrop. Fruits were used to prepare jams with different °Brix and stuffed fish. A systematic evaluation of the degradation of anthocyanins and Anthocyanidins of blueberries was performed; for that purpose an HPLC/DAD method was used to determine anthocyanin profile and anthocyanidin contents in fresh and cooked blueberries and in jams. Ten anthocyanins were separated and monitored in methanolic extracts. Of the six common Anthocyanidins, four were identified in the hydrolysates, namely, delphinidin, cyanidin, petunidin and malvidin. Percentage of degradation of anthocyanins and Anthocyanidins in jams is highly dependent on °Brix: 64−76 °Brix led to 20−30% degradation, whereas 80 °Brix resulted in degradation between 50 and 60%. Percentage of degradation of anthocyanins in whole blueberries cooked in stuffed fish ranged between 45 and 50%, however, for an…

Ramesh C Gupta – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • berry Anthocyanidins synergistically suppress growth and invasive potential of human non small cell lung cancer cells
    Cancer Letters, 2012
    Co-Authors: Hina Kausar, Jeyaprakash Jeyabalan, Farrukh Aqil, Deepika Chabba, Jasmeen Sidana, Inder Pal Singh, Ramesh C Gupta

    Abstract:

    Berry Anthocyanidins (cyanidin, malvidin, peonidin, petunidin and delphinidin) have increasingly been explored for their anticancer effects; however, their combinatorial effects as a mixture, as present in blueberry, bilberry and Indian blackberry (‘Jamun’) remain untested. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that the combination of suboptimal concentrations of equimolar Anthocyanidins synergistically inhibited growth of two aggressive non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines, with minimal effects on non-tumorigenic cell viability. The induction of cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis and suppression of NSCLC cell invasion and migration were also significantly greater with the mixture than individual Anthocyanidins. The superior effects of the combinatorial treatment presumably resulted from its effects on the oncogenic Notch and WNT pathways and their downstream targets (β-catenin, c-myc, cyclin D1, cyclin B1, pERK, MMP9 and VEGF proteins), enhanced cleavage of the apoptotic mediators Bcl2 and PARP and enhanced inhibition of TNFα-induced NF-kappa B activation. In vivo, both the native mixture of Anthocyanidins from bilberry (0.5mg/mouse) and the most potent anthocyanidin, delphinidin (1.5mg/mouse) significantly inhibited the growth of H1299 xenografts in nude miceby ≈60%. Notably, the effective dose of delphinidin in the anthocyanidin mixture was 8-fold lower than delphinidin alone, further emphasizing synergism. Our results thus demonstrate therapeutic potential of berries rich in this mixture of diverse Anthocyanidins for non-small-cell lung cancer treatment and to prevent its future recurrence and metastasis.

  • abstract 3693 berry Anthocyanidins inhibit key events of lung cancer metastasis effects on mirna and protein targets
    Cancer Research, 2011
    Co-Authors: Hina Kausar, Ramesh C Gupta

    Abstract:

    Lung cancer continues to represent the largest cause of mortality in the world claiming over 1.3 million lives every year. The majority of patients who succumb to lung cancer die from cancer relapse and/or metastatic disease progression making the search for new anti-cancer and anti-metastasis agents imperative. Berry phytochemicals have received increasing attention lately for their various biological effects. We previously demonstrated notable synergistic anti-tumor effects of blueberry Anthocyanidins (cyanidin, malvidin, peonidin, petunidin and delphinidin) against human lung cancer cells in culture and in vivo in nude mouse model. Herein, we show the anti-metastatic effects of all the 5 Anthocyanidins individually and in combination in the highly aggressive and invasive human NSCLC H1299 cells. Using wound-healing and Boyden chamber assays, all the five Anthocyanidins (25 µM each) were found to exhibit varied inhibitory effects on H1299 cell migration and invasion. However, an equimolar mixture containing either 3.125 or 6.25 µM of each anthocyanidin elicited similar inhibition of H1299 cell migration and invasion indicating a synergistic effect. Given the multi-complexity of the metastasis process, the effect of Anthocyanidins on a plethora of molecular targets mediating of the metastatic process was analyzed by western blotting. We found that berry Anthocyanidins decreased the expression of several metastatic and angiogenic mediators, viz; matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), c-MYC, NOTCH-1, WNT1. Furthermore, the Anthocyanidins effectively inhibited TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation and suppressed of ERK-1/2 activation, which could further explain their anti-invasive capabilities. Recently, emerging evidence also suggests the involvement of miRNAs in regulating various processes of cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Effect of Anthocyanidins on four such miRNAs frequently downregulated in NSCLC and implicated in lung cancer invasion and metastasis (miR-126, miR125a-5p, miR200c) and lung cancer relapse (miR-34a) was analyzed by qPCR. We observed a significant increase in the expression of all the four miRNAs by the Anthocyanidins. Target prediction scan for gene targets revealed several angiogenic signaling molecules to be regulated by these miRNA9s. Our results thus establish that protective properties of Anthocyanidins may arise, at least, in part, from its capability to manipulate some distinct and some overlapping miRNA and protein targets that may potentiate the anti-cancer and anti-metastatic effects of the berry Anthocyanidins. Collectively, our data suggest that berry Anthocyanidins may provide a safe, effective, unconventional and user-friendly approach to prevent or delay the onset of lung cancer recurrence and metastasis (Supported from KLCRP and Agnes Brown Duggan Endowment). Citation Format: {Authors}. {Abstract title} [abstract]. In: Proceedings of the 102nd Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research; 2011 Apr 2-6; Orlando, FL. Philadelphia (PA): AACR; Cancer Res 2011;71(8 Suppl):Abstract nr 3693. doi:10.1158/1538-7445.AM2011-3693

  • abstract 1884 synergistic anti cancer activities of berry Anthocyanidins on human lung cancer cells
    Cancer Research, 2010
    Co-Authors: Hina Kausar, Jeyaprakash Jeyabalan, Farrukh Aqil, Deepika Chabba, Jasmeen Sidana, Inder Pal Singh, Ramesh C Gupta

    Abstract:

    Emerging evidence suggest that cancer develops due to defects in multiple genes, therefore, a combination of naturally occurring compounds targeting multiple signal transduction pathways would be ideal for the prevention/treatment of cancer. Berries are emerging as one of the most effective fruits because of their potent antioxidant, antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory activities. The various biological activities of berries have been attributed to abundance of diverse phenolic constituents, particularly anthocyanins (Anthocyanidins glycosides) that cause intense coloration. Several studies with individual Anthocyanidins have been shown to inhibit malignant cell survival and confound many oncogenic signaling events. In this study we tested individual Anthocyanidins (cyanidin, malvidin, peonidin, petunidin and delphinidin) and their mixture isolated from bilberry or black current for their abilities to inhibit the growth of two non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells in culture and in vivo. The MTT cell proliferation assay demonstrated that all the five commercial Anthocyanidins resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of H1299 and A549 cell growth, with delphinidin being the most potent. Interestingly, however, a 1:1 mixture of all these five Anthocyanidins elicited significantly higher, dose-dependent, antiproliferative activity, indicating a synergistic effect. Selected glycosides of these Anthocyanidins were found to be significantly less active. Assuming that the growth inhibition occurred due to induction of apoptosis mediated by cell-cycle arrest, we investigated the effect of individual Anthocyanidins and their mixture on cell-cycle distribution and apoptosis. Flow-cytometric analysis of apoptosis with propidium iodide staining revealed that the induction of apoptosis was significantly greater with the mixture than either agent alone. The superior apoptotic effects of the combinatorial treatment were, in part, attributed to the enhanced cleavage of PARP, decreased expression of cyclin D1, cyclin B1 and pERK proteins in H1299 cells. Anti-tumor activity of delphinidin and the anthocyanidin mixture, isolated from black currant and bilberry, respectively was determined using nude mouse lung cancer xenograft model. We found that both delphinidin and the mixture of Anthocyanidins reduced the H1299 tumor xenograft growth by 50% compared to the vehicle treatment. The effective dose of anthocyanidin mixture (0.5 mg/dose) was 3-times lower than delphinidin (1.5 mg/dose) when given i.p. on alternate days, indicating synergistic anti-tumor activity of Anthocyanidins, consistent with our cell culture data. Together, our results suggest that increased consumption of bilberry, blueberry, or Indian blackberry or ‘jamun’ which are rich in this mixture of Anthocyanidins would be useful for the prevention/treatment of NSCLC (Supported from KLCRP grant & Duggan Endowment). Citation Format: {Authors}. {Abstract title} [abstract]. In: Proceedings of the 101st Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research; 2010 Apr 17-21; Washington, DC. Philadelphia (PA): AACR; Cancer Res 2010;70(8 Suppl):Abstract nr 1884.

Jonathan J. Turnbull – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The C-4 stereochemistry of leucocyanidin substrates for anthocyanidin synthase affects product selectivity
    Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters, 2003
    Co-Authors: Jonathan J. Turnbull, Michael J. Nagle, Jürgen Seibel, Richard W. D. Welford, Guy H. Grant, Christopher J. Schofield

    Abstract:

    Abstract Anthocyanidin synthase (ANS), an iron(II) and 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) dependent oxygenase, catalyses the penultimate step in anthocyanin biosynthesis by oxidation of the 2 R ,3 S ,4 S – cis -leucoAnthocyanidins. It has been believed that in vivo the products of ANS are the Anthocyanidins. However, in vitro studies on ANS using optically active cis – and trans- leucocyanidin substrates identified cyanidin as only a minor product; instead both quercetin and dihydroquercetin are products with the distribution being dependent on the C-4 stereochemistry of the leucocyanidin substrates.

  • Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction of anthocyanidin synthase from Arabidopsis thaliana
    Acta Crystallographica Section D-biological Crystallography, 2001
    Co-Authors: Jonathan J. Turnbull, Andy G. Prescott, Christopher J. Schofield, Rupert C. Wilmouth

    Abstract:

    Anthocyanidin synthase (ANS) from Arabidopsis thaliana is a non-haem iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase reported to catalyse the conversion of leucoAnthocyanidins to Anthocyanidins. Anthocyanidins are precursors of anthocyanins, which are a major family of pigments in higher plants. ANS was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method using polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.0, b = 73.2, c = 87.0 A, and diffract to 2.4 A using Cu Kα radiation.

  • Are Anthocyanidins the immediate products of anthocyanidin synthase
    Chemical Communications, 2000
    Co-Authors: Jonathan J. Turnbull, Christopher J. Schofield, Wendy J. Sobey, Robin T. Aplin, Abby Hassan, John L. Firmin, Andy G. Prescott

    Abstract:

    Anthocyanidin synthase catalyses the in vitro
    conversion of its natural substrate, leucocyanidin, to cis- and
    trans-dihydroquercetin, quercetin and a small amount of cyanidin;
    incubation of trans-dihydroquercetin gave quercetin.