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Anthropology

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Sarah Pink – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Applications of Anthropology: Professional Anthropology in the Twenty-first Century
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Sarah Pink

    Abstract:

    List of Illustrations Acknowledgements Introduction: Applications of Anthropology Sarah Pink Chapter 1. Dinner at Claridges? Anthropology and the ‘Captains of Industry’, 1947-1955 David Mills Chapter 2. The Pure and Impure? Reflections on Applying Anthropology and Doing Ethnography Simon Roberts Chapter 3. The Need to Engage with Non-Ethnographic Research Methods: A Personal View Adam Drazin Chapter 4. International Development, Social Analysis,… and Anthropology? Applying Anthropology in and to Development Maia Green Chapter 5. Anthropology at The Centre Reflections on Research, Policy Guidance and Decision Support Mils Hills Chapter 6. Speaking of Silence: Reflections on the Application of Anthropology to the U.K. Health Services Elizabeth Hart Chapter 7. Anthropologists in Television: A Disappearing World? Paul Henley Chapter 8. Research, Representations and Responsibilities: An Anthropologist in the Contested World of Foxhunting Garry Marvin Chapter 9. ‘Culture’ in Court: Albanian Migrants and the Anthropologist as Expert Witness Stephanie Schwandner-Sievers Contributors Index

  • Images, Senses and Applications: Engaging Visual Anthropology
    Visual Anthropology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Sarah Pink

    Abstract:

    In this article I discuss how visual Anthropology methods are advancing in a present-day environment where applied, activist, public and interdisciplinary anthropologies are increasingly central. In earlier work [Pink 2004, 2006, 2007a] I outlined the field of an applied visual Anthropology, and discussed the potential of visual methods and media in the production of a public Anthropology [Pink 2006]. Here I build on this to suggest how recent visual Anthropology practices might both contribute to and resolve issues relating to contemporary debates in applied and public Anthropology and the relationship between scholarly research and social intervention.

  • The future of sensory Anthropology/the Anthropology of the senses
    Social Anthropology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Sarah Pink

    Abstract:

    A focus on the senses has become a key theme in contemporary Anthropology. In this short piece I suggest that this focus can be understood in terms of two strands, the original Anthropology of the senses on the one hand, and the newer sensory Anthropology on the other. Given the recent rapid development of interest in this field, an assessment of its status and speculation about its future is now rather timely. A sensory Anthropology implies a ‘re-thought’ Anthropology, informed by theories of sensory perception, rather than a sub-discipline exclusively or empirically about the senses. Rather like the cumulative ‘re-thinkings’ of Anthropology over the last decades this adds to the discipline having become (albeit unevenly) reflexive, gendered, embodied and visual, while rejecting ‘traditional’ forms of cross-cultural comparison, and disassociating the relationship between culture and place. Notably these rethinkings have parallels across cognate disciplines and indeed bring the research and theoretical commitments of anthropologists closer to those of some geographers and sociologists. Anthropologists are increasingly attending to arts and media practices and are engaging more closely with public and applied roles. While the former shifts enable anthropologists to re-think the discipline with other anthropologists, all of these moves encourage interdisciplinary collaborations. A contemporary sensory Anthropology is thus inevitably intertwined with the lasting residues of these other revisions and the connections they forge in interdisciplinary fields. Sensory Anthropology both has its roots in and departs from the anthropological study of sensory perception and categories that characterises the Anthropology of the senses. While the former engages directly across disciplines, the latter is more specialised. While in some contexts it has great potential, it has fewer possibilities. Some of which include providing examples that contest the universality of modern western categories or as part of interdisciplinary research that shares a focus on the senses as its object of study. Indeed, the Anthropology of the senses informed by the principles outlined above would be subsumed as part of sensory Anthropology. What then might be the future of sensory Anthropology? Below I outline two possible areas of influence – as part of interdisciplinary scholarship and as a leading approach to innovative interdisciplinary ethnography. Sensory Anthropology is essentially an interdisciplinary approach. It is dependent on other disciplines for its foundational ideas. This signifies one of its departures from the Anthropology of the senses. Philosophical principles are influential in understanding

Gabriela Boangiu – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The Future of Visual Anthropology
    Social Anthropology, 2006
    Co-Authors: Sarah Pink, Gabriela Boangiu

    Abstract:

    From an eminent author in the field, The Future of Visual Anthropology develops a new approach to visual Anthropology and presents a groundbreaking examination of developments within the field and the way forward for the subdiscipline in the twenty-first century. The explosion of visual media in recent years has generated a wide range of visual and digital technologies which have transformed visual research and analysis. The result is an exciting new interdisciplinary approach of great potential influence for the future of social/cultural Anthropology. Sarah Pink argues that this potential can be harnessed by engaging visual Anthropology with its wider contexts, including: the increasing use of visual research methods across the social sciences and humanities the growth in popularity of the visual as methodology and object of analysis within mainstream Anthropology and applied Anthropology the growing interest in ‘Anthropology of the senses’ and media Anthropology the development of new visual technologies that allow anthropologists to work in new ways. This book has immense interdisciplinary potential, and is essential reading for students, researchers and practitioners of visual Anthropology, media Anthropology, visual cultural studies, media studies and sociology.

Barbara Miller – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • LibGuides: Anthropology Division: Linguistic Anthropology
    , 2012
    Co-Authors: Barbara Miller

    Abstract:

    Subject guide for all areas of Anthropology Additional databases for linguistic Anthropology

  • LibGuides: Anthropology Division: Cultural Anthropology
    , 2012
    Co-Authors: Barbara Miller

    Abstract:

    Subject guide for all areas of Anthropology Additional databases that may have content for Cultural Anthropology

  • LibGuides: Anthropology Division: Biological Anthropology
    , 2012
    Co-Authors: Barbara Miller

    Abstract:

    Subject guide for all areas of Anthropology These databases cover biological, evolutionary, medical, and physical Anthropology