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Martin Riese – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Quantifying pollution transport from the Asian monsoon Anticyclone into the lower stratosphere
    Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2017
    Co-Authors: Felix Ploeger, Paul Konopka, Kaley A. Walker, Martin Riese

    Abstract:

    Abstract. Pollution transport from the surface to the stratosphere within the Asian monsoon circulation may cause harmful effects on stratospheric chemistry and climate. Here, we investigate air mass transport from the monsoon Anticyclone into the stratosphere using a Lagrangian chemistry transport model. We show how two main transport pathways from the Anticyclone emerge: (i) into the tropical stratosphere (tropical pipe), and (ii) into the Northern Hemisphere (NH) extratropical lower stratosphere. Maximum Anticyclone air mass fractions reach around 5 % in the tropical pipe and 15 % in the extratropical lowermost stratosphere over the course of a year. The Anticyclone air mass fraction correlates well with satellite hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and carbon monoxide (CO) observations, confirming that pollution is transported deep into the tropical stratosphere from the Asian monsoon Anticyclone. Cross-tropopause transport occurs in a vertical chimney, but with the pollutants transported quasi-horizontally along isentropes above the tropopause into the tropics and NH.

  • Quantifying pollution transport from the Asian monsoon Anticyclone into the lower stratosphere
    , 2017
    Co-Authors: Felix Ploeger, Paul Konopka, Kaley Walker, Martin Riese

    Abstract:

    Abstract. Pollution transport from the surface to the stratosphere within the Asian monsoon circulation may cause harmful effects on stratospheric chemistry and climate. Here, we investigate air mass transport from the monsoon Anticyclone into the stratosphere using a Lagrangian chemistry transport model. We show how two main transport pathways from the Anticyclone emerge: (i) into the tropical stratosphere (tropical pipe), and (ii) into the Northern hemisphere (NH) extra-tropical lower stratosphere. Maximum Anticyclone air mass fractions reach around 5 % in the tropical pipe and 15 % in the extra-tropical lowermost stratosphere over the course of a year. The Anticyclone air mass fraction correlates well with satellite hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and carbon monoxide (CO) observations, corroborating that pollution is transported deep into the tropical stratosphere from the Asian monsoon Anticyclone. Cross-tropopause transport occurs in a vertical chimney, but with the emissions transported quasi-horizontally along isentropes above the tropopause into the tropics and NH.

  • observations of pan and its confinement in the asian summer monsoon Anticyclone in high spatial resolution
    Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jörn Ungermann, Felix Ploeger, Barbel Vogel, Rolf Muller, Mandfred Ern, Martin Kaufmann, R Spang, Martin Riese

    Abstract:

    Abstract. This paper presents an analysis of trace gases in the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) region on the basis of observations by the CRISTA infrared limb sounder taken in low-earth orbit in August 1997. The spatially highly resolved measurements of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and O3 allow a detailed analysis of an eddy-shedding event of the ASM Anticyclone. We identify enhanced PAN volume mixing ratios (VMRs) within the main Anticyclone and within the eddy, which are suitable as a tracer for polluted air originating in India and China. Plotting the retrieved PAN VMRs against potential vorticity (PV) and potential temperature reveals that the PV value at which the PAN VMRs exhibit the strongest decrease with respect to PV increases with potential temperature. These PV values might be used to identify the extent of the ASM. Using temperature values also derived from CRISTA measurements, we also computed the location of the thermal tropopause according to the WMO criterion and find that it confines the PAN anomaly vertically within the main ASM Anticyclone. In contrast, the shed eddy exhibits enhanced PAN VMRs for 1 to 2 km above the thermal tropopause. Using the relationship between PAN as a tropospheric tracer and O3 as a stratospheric tracer to identify mixed air parcels, we further found the Anticyclone to contain few such air parcels, whereas the region between the Anticyclone and the eddy as well as the eddy itself contains many mixed air parcels. In combination, this implies that while the Anticyclone confines polluted air masses well, eddy shedding provides a very rapid horizontal transport pathway of Asian pollution into the extratropical lowermost stratosphere with a timescale of only a few days.

C. D. Boone – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Chemical isolation in the Asian monsoon Anticyclone observed in Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE-FTS) data
    Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2008
    Co-Authors: M. Park, W. J. Randel, L. K. Emmons, P. F. Bernath, K. A. Walker, C. D. Boone

    Abstract:

    Evidence of chemical isolation in the Asian monsoon Anticyclone is presented using chemical constituents obtained from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer instrument during summer (June?August) of 2004?2006. Carbon monoxide (CO) shows a broad maximum over the monsoon Anticyclone region in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS); these enhanced CO values are associated with air pollution transported upward by convection, and confined by the strong anticyclonic circulation. Profiles inside the Anticyclone show enhancement of tropospheric tracers CO, HCN, C2H6, and C2H2 between ~12 to 20 km, with maxima near 13?15 km. Strong correlations are observed among constituents, consistent with sources from near-surface pollution and biomass burning. Stratospheric tracers (O3, HNO3 and HCl) exhibit decreased values inside the Anticyclone between ~12?20 km. These observations are further evidence of transport of lower tropospheric air into the UTLS region, and isolation of air within the Anticyclone. The relative enhancements of tropospheric species inside the Anticyclone are closely related to the photochemical lifetime of the species, with strongest enhancement for shorter lived species. Vertical profiles of the ratio of C2H2/CO (used to measure the relative age of air) suggest relatively rapid transport of fresh emissions up to the tropopause level inside the Anticyclone.

  • Chemical Isolation in the Asian monsoon Anticyclone observed in Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE-FTS) data
    Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, 2007
    Co-Authors: M. Park, W. J. Randel, L. K. Emmons, P. F. Bernath, K. A. Walker, C. D. Boone

    Abstract:

    Evidence of chemical isolation in the Asian monsoon Anticyclone is presented using chemical constituents obtained from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer instrument during summer (June?August) of 2004?2006. Carbon monoxide (CO) shows a broad maximum over the monsoon Anticyclone region in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS); these enhanced CO values are associated with air pollution transported upward by convection, and confined by the strong anticyclonic circulation. Profiles inside the Anticyclone show enhancement of tropospheric tracers CO, HCN, C2H6, and C2H2 between ~12 to 20 km, with maxima near 13?15 km. Strong correlations are observed among constituents, consistent with sources from near-surface pollution and biomass burning. Stratospheric tracers (O3, HNO3 and HCl) exhibit decreased values inside the Anticyclone between ~12?20 km. These observations are further evidence of transport of lower tropospheric air into the UTLS region, and isolation of air within the Anticyclone. The relative enhancements of tropospheric species inside the Anticyclone are closely related to the photochemical lifetime of the species, with strongest enhancement for shorter lived species. Vertical profiles of the ratio of C2H2/CO (used to measure the relative age of air) suggest relatively rapid transport of fresh emissions up to tropopause level inside the Anticyclone.

Felix Ploeger – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Quantifying pollution transport from the Asian monsoon Anticyclone into the lower stratosphere
    Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2017
    Co-Authors: Felix Ploeger, Paul Konopka, Kaley A. Walker, Martin Riese

    Abstract:

    Abstract. Pollution transport from the surface to the stratosphere within the Asian monsoon circulation may cause harmful effects on stratospheric chemistry and climate. Here, we investigate air mass transport from the monsoon Anticyclone into the stratosphere using a Lagrangian chemistry transport model. We show how two main transport pathways from the Anticyclone emerge: (i) into the tropical stratosphere (tropical pipe), and (ii) into the Northern Hemisphere (NH) extratropical lower stratosphere. Maximum Anticyclone air mass fractions reach around 5 % in the tropical pipe and 15 % in the extratropical lowermost stratosphere over the course of a year. The Anticyclone air mass fraction correlates well with satellite hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and carbon monoxide (CO) observations, confirming that pollution is transported deep into the tropical stratosphere from the Asian monsoon Anticyclone. Cross-tropopause transport occurs in a vertical chimney, but with the pollutants transported quasi-horizontally along isentropes above the tropopause into the tropics and NH.

  • Quantifying pollution transport from the Asian monsoon Anticyclone into the lower stratosphere
    , 2017
    Co-Authors: Felix Ploeger, Paul Konopka, Kaley Walker, Martin Riese

    Abstract:

    Abstract. Pollution transport from the surface to the stratosphere within the Asian monsoon circulation may cause harmful effects on stratospheric chemistry and climate. Here, we investigate air mass transport from the monsoon Anticyclone into the stratosphere using a Lagrangian chemistry transport model. We show how two main transport pathways from the Anticyclone emerge: (i) into the tropical stratosphere (tropical pipe), and (ii) into the Northern hemisphere (NH) extra-tropical lower stratosphere. Maximum Anticyclone air mass fractions reach around 5 % in the tropical pipe and 15 % in the extra-tropical lowermost stratosphere over the course of a year. The Anticyclone air mass fraction correlates well with satellite hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and carbon monoxide (CO) observations, corroborating that pollution is transported deep into the tropical stratosphere from the Asian monsoon Anticyclone. Cross-tropopause transport occurs in a vertical chimney, but with the emissions transported quasi-horizontally along isentropes above the tropopause into the tropics and NH.

  • observations of pan and its confinement in the asian summer monsoon Anticyclone in high spatial resolution
    Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jörn Ungermann, Felix Ploeger, Barbel Vogel, Rolf Muller, Mandfred Ern, Martin Kaufmann, R Spang, Martin Riese

    Abstract:

    Abstract. This paper presents an analysis of trace gases in the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) region on the basis of observations by the CRISTA infrared limb sounder taken in low-earth orbit in August 1997. The spatially highly resolved measurements of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and O3 allow a detailed analysis of an eddy-shedding event of the ASM Anticyclone. We identify enhanced PAN volume mixing ratios (VMRs) within the main Anticyclone and within the eddy, which are suitable as a tracer for polluted air originating in India and China. Plotting the retrieved PAN VMRs against potential vorticity (PV) and potential temperature reveals that the PV value at which the PAN VMRs exhibit the strongest decrease with respect to PV increases with potential temperature. These PV values might be used to identify the extent of the ASM. Using temperature values also derived from CRISTA measurements, we also computed the location of the thermal tropopause according to the WMO criterion and find that it confines the PAN anomaly vertically within the main ASM Anticyclone. In contrast, the shed eddy exhibits enhanced PAN VMRs for 1 to 2 km above the thermal tropopause. Using the relationship between PAN as a tropospheric tracer and O3 as a stratospheric tracer to identify mixed air parcels, we further found the Anticyclone to contain few such air parcels, whereas the region between the Anticyclone and the eddy as well as the eddy itself contains many mixed air parcels. In combination, this implies that while the Anticyclone confines polluted air masses well, eddy shedding provides a very rapid horizontal transport pathway of Asian pollution into the extratropical lowermost stratosphere with a timescale of only a few days.