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Antidepressant Therapy

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Antidepressant Therapy – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Ann Deneris – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors as First-Line Antidepressant Therapy for Perinatal Depression.
    Journal of midwifery & women's health, 2017
    Co-Authors: Gwen Latendresse, Christina Elmore, Ann Deneris

    Abstract:

    One in 7 women experience depression during the prenatal and/or postpartum period. Nonpharmacologic approaches are known to be as effective as pharmacologic therapies for mild to moderate depression. However, for women who suffer from moderate to severe depression, Antidepressant Therapy may be the best option, in combination with nonpharmacologic approaches. Considering the substantial negative impact of untreated perinatal depression, providers of prenatal care need to be prepared to diagnose depression, prescribe first-line Antidepressants, and refer to other professionals. The purpose of this article is to assist providers to select the safest, most effective selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) as the first-line Antidepressant during pregnancy and lactation. Information about side effects, adverse effects, contraindications, and clinical considerations associated with the use of SSRIs is provided. A brief discussion of nonpharmacologic therapies is provided but is not the focus of this article.

Charles R Ashby – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • an open pilot study combining risperidone and a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor as initial Antidepressant Therapy
    The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 2002
    Co-Authors: Shigehiro Hirose, Charles R Ashby

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: Atypical antipsychotics such as risperidone or olanzapine have been reported to be effective when added to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) in cases of depression in which treatment with an SSRI alone is not effective. It is possible that the combination of an SSRI and an atypical antipsychotic may be efficacious as an initial treatment for major depression. METHOD: Thirty-six subjects who fulfilled DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder were given fluvoxamin, 50 or 75 mg/day, with risperidone, 0.5 or 1 mg/day, at the start of treatment. The dose of fluvoxamine was increased to 100 or 150 mg/day on the fourth day of the treatment and maintained thereafter. Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) scores were obtained at base-line and every week for 6 weeks. Remission and response were defined, respectively, as > or = 75% and 50%-74% reduction from baseline in HAM-D score. RESULTS: Of 30 subjects who completed the 6-week study, 23 (76%) achieved remission, 5 (17%) achieved response, and 2 (7%) were nonresponsive. Of the 6 patients who did not complete the study, 3 showed remission, 1 showed response, and 2 showed minimal or no response by the time of dropout. The reported adverse effects were mild, and none of the 36 subjects enrolled in the study manifested or reported extrapyramidal symptoms, nausea, or vomiting. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that the combination of risperidone and fluvoxamine from the beginning of Antidepressant Therapy enhances the therapeutic response rate in depression.

Gwen Latendresse – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors as First-Line Antidepressant Therapy for Perinatal Depression.
    Journal of midwifery & women's health, 2017
    Co-Authors: Gwen Latendresse, Christina Elmore, Ann Deneris

    Abstract:

    One in 7 women experience depression during the prenatal and/or postpartum period. Nonpharmacologic approaches are known to be as effective as pharmacologic therapies for mild to moderate depression. However, for women who suffer from moderate to severe depression, Antidepressant Therapy may be the best option, in combination with nonpharmacologic approaches. Considering the substantial negative impact of untreated perinatal depression, providers of prenatal care need to be prepared to diagnose depression, prescribe first-line Antidepressants, and refer to other professionals. The purpose of this article is to assist providers to select the safest, most effective selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) as the first-line Antidepressant during pregnancy and lactation. Information about side effects, adverse effects, contraindications, and clinical considerations associated with the use of SSRIs is provided. A brief discussion of nonpharmacologic therapies is provided but is not the focus of this article.