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G S Averichev – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • observation of the Antimatter helium 4 nucleus
    Nature, 2011
    Co-Authors: H Agakishiev, M M Aggarwal, Zubayer Ahammed, A V Alakhverdyants, I Alekseev, Jefferson Alford, B.d. Anderson, D Arkhipkin, C Anson, G S Averichev

    Abstract:

    High-energy nuclear collisions create an energy density similar to that of the Universe microseconds after the Big Bang(1); in both cases, matter and Antimatter are formed with comparable abundance. However, the relatively short-lived expansion in nuclear collisions allows Antimatter to decouple quickly from matter, and avoid annihilation. Thus, a high-energy accelerator of heavy nuclei provides an efficient means of producing and studying Antimatter. The Antimatter helium-4 nucleus ((4)(He) over bar), also known as the anti-alpha ((alpha) over bar), consists of two antiprotons and two antineutrons (baryon number B = -4). It has not been observed previously, although the alpha-particle was identified a century ago by Rutherford and is present in cosmic radiation at the ten per cent level(2). Antimatter nuclei with B -1 have been observed only as rare products of interactions at particle accelerators, where the rate of antinucleus production in high-energy collisions decreases by a factor of about 1,000 with each additional antinucleon(3-5). Here we report the observation of (4)<(He) over bar, the heaviest observed antinucleus to date. In total, 18 (4)(He) over bar counts were detected at the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC; ref. 6) in 10(9) recorded gold-on-gold (Au+Au) collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 200 GeV and 62 GeV per nucleon-nucleon pair. The yield is consistent with expectations from thermodynamic(7) and coalescent nucleosynthesis(8) models, providing an indication of the production rate of even heavier Antimatter nuclei and a benchmark for possible future observations of (4)(He) over bar in cosmic radiation.

  • Observation of the Antimatter helium-4 nucleus
    Nature, 2011
    Co-Authors: H Agakishiev, M M Aggarwal, Zubayer Ahammed, A V Alakhverdyants, I Alekseev, Jefferson Alford, B.d. Anderson, C. D. Anson, D Arkhipkin, G S Averichev

    Abstract:

    High-energy nuclear collisions create an energy density similar to that of the universe microseconds after the Big Bang, and in both cases, matter and Antimatter are formed with comparable abundance. However, the relatively short-lived expansion in nuclear collisions allows Antimatter to decouple quickly from matter, and avoid annihilation. Thus, a high energy accelerator of heavy nuclei is an efficient means of producing and studying Antimatter. The Antimatter helium-4 nucleus ($^4\bar{He}$), also known as the anti-{\alpha} ($\bar{\alpha}$), consists of two antiprotons and two antineutrons (baryon number B=-4). It has not been observed previously, although the {\alpha} particle was identified a century ago by Rutherford and is present in cosmic radiation at the 10% level. Antimatter nuclei with B < -1 have been observed only as rare products of interactions at particle accelerators, where the rate of antinucleus production in high-energy collisions decreases by about 1000 with each additional antinucleon. We present the observation of the Antimatter helium-4 nucleus, the heaviest observed antinucleus. In total 18 $^4\bar{He}$ counts were detected at the STAR experiment at RHIC in 10$^9$ recorded Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energies of 200 GeV and 62 GeV per nucleon-nucleon pair. The yield is consistent with expectations from thermodynamic and coalescent nucleosynthesis models, which has implications beyond nuclear physics.

Jay D. Tasson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Antimatter-gravity couplings, and Lorentz symmetry
    Hyperfine Interactions, 2014
    Co-Authors: Jay D. Tasson

    Abstract:

    Implications of possible CPT and Lorentz violation for Antimatter-gravity experiments as well as other Antimatter tests are considered in the context of the general field-theory-based framework of the Standard-Model Extension (SME).

  • Gravitational physics with Antimatter
    Hyperfine Interactions, 2009
    Co-Authors: Jay D. Tasson

    Abstract:

    The production of low-energy Antimatter provides unique opportunities to search for new physics in an unexplored regime. Testing gravitational interactions with Antimatter is one such opportunity. Here a scenario based on Lorentz and CPT violation in the Standard-Model Extension is considered in which anomalous gravitational effects in Antimatter could arise.

  • Gravitational physics with Antimatter
    Hyperfine Interactions, 2009
    Co-Authors: Jay D. Tasson

    Abstract:

    The production of low-energy Antimatter provides unique opportunities to
    search for new physics in an unexplored regime. Testing gravitational
    interactions with Antimatter is one such opportunity. Here a scenario based on
    Lorentz and CPT violation in the Standard- Model Extension is considered in
    which anomalous gravitational effects in Antimatter could arise.Comment: 5 pages, presented at the International Conference on Exotic Atoms
    (EXA 2008) and the 9th International Conference on Low Energy Antiproton
    Physics (LEAP 2008), Vienna, Austria, September 200

H Agakishiev – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • observation of the Antimatter helium 4 nucleus
    Nature, 2011
    Co-Authors: H Agakishiev, M M Aggarwal, Zubayer Ahammed, A V Alakhverdyants, I Alekseev, Jefferson Alford, B.d. Anderson, D Arkhipkin, C Anson, G S Averichev

    Abstract:

    High-energy nuclear collisions create an energy density similar to that of the Universe microseconds after the Big Bang(1); in both cases, matter and Antimatter are formed with comparable abundance. However, the relatively short-lived expansion in nuclear collisions allows Antimatter to decouple quickly from matter, and avoid annihilation. Thus, a high-energy accelerator of heavy nuclei provides an efficient means of producing and studying Antimatter. The Antimatter helium-4 nucleus ((4)(He) over bar), also known as the anti-alpha ((alpha) over bar), consists of two antiprotons and two antineutrons (baryon number B = -4). It has not been observed previously, although the alpha-particle was identified a century ago by Rutherford and is present in cosmic radiation at the ten per cent level(2). Antimatter nuclei with B -1 have been observed only as rare products of interactions at particle accelerators, where the rate of antinucleus production in high-energy collisions decreases by a factor of about 1,000 with each additional antinucleon(3-5). Here we report the observation of (4)<(He) over bar, the heaviest observed antinucleus to date. In total, 18 (4)(He) over bar counts were detected at the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC; ref. 6) in 10(9) recorded gold-on-gold (Au+Au) collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 200 GeV and 62 GeV per nucleon-nucleon pair. The yield is consistent with expectations from thermodynamic(7) and coalescent nucleosynthesis(8) models, providing an indication of the production rate of even heavier Antimatter nuclei and a benchmark for possible future observations of (4)(He) over bar in cosmic radiation.

  • Observation of the Antimatter helium-4 nucleus
    Nature, 2011
    Co-Authors: H Agakishiev, M M Aggarwal, Zubayer Ahammed, A V Alakhverdyants, I Alekseev, Jefferson Alford, B.d. Anderson, C. D. Anson, D Arkhipkin, G S Averichev

    Abstract:

    High-energy nuclear collisions create an energy density similar to that of the universe microseconds after the Big Bang, and in both cases, matter and Antimatter are formed with comparable abundance. However, the relatively short-lived expansion in nuclear collisions allows Antimatter to decouple quickly from matter, and avoid annihilation. Thus, a high energy accelerator of heavy nuclei is an efficient means of producing and studying Antimatter. The Antimatter helium-4 nucleus ($^4\bar{He}$), also known as the anti-{\alpha} ($\bar{\alpha}$), consists of two antiprotons and two antineutrons (baryon number B=-4). It has not been observed previously, although the {\alpha} particle was identified a century ago by Rutherford and is present in cosmic radiation at the 10% level. Antimatter nuclei with B < -1 have been observed only as rare products of interactions at particle accelerators, where the rate of antinucleus production in high-energy collisions decreases by about 1000 with each additional antinucleon. We present the observation of the Antimatter helium-4 nucleus, the heaviest observed antinucleus. In total 18 $^4\bar{He}$ counts were detected at the STAR experiment at RHIC in 10$^9$ recorded Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energies of 200 GeV and 62 GeV per nucleon-nucleon pair. The yield is consistent with expectations from thermodynamic and coalescent nucleosynthesis models, which has implications beyond nuclear physics.