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Antipyretic Analgesic Agent

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Nishant S. Jain – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Endocannabinoids mediate anxiolytic-like effect of acetaminophen via CB1 receptors
    Progress in neuro-psychopharmacology & biological psychiatry, 2009
    Co-Authors: Sudhir N. Umathe, Shyamshree S.s. Manna, Kaweri S. Utturwar, Nishant S. Jain

    Abstract:

    Abstract Acetaminophen (Paracetamol), a most commonly used Antipyretic/Analgesic Agent, is metabolized to AM404 ( N -arachidonoylphenolamine) that inhibits uptake and degradation of anandamide which is reported to mediate the Analgesic action of acetaminophen via CB1 receptor. AM404 and anandamide are also reported to produce anxiolytic-like behavior. In view of the implication of endocannabinoids in the effect of acetaminophen, we contemplated that acetaminophen may have anxiolytic-like effect. Therefore, this possibility was tested by observing the effects of various doses of acetaminophen in mice on anxiety-related indices of Vogel conflict test and social interaction test. The results from both the tests indicated that acetaminophen (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg, i.p.) or anandamide (10 or 20 µg/mouse, i.c.v.) dose dependently elicited anxiolytic-like effect, that was comparable to diazepam (2 mg/kg, i.p.). Moreover, co-administration of sub-effective dose of acetaminophen (25 mg/kg, i.p.) and anandamide (5 µg/mouse, i.c.v) produced similar anxiolytic effect. Further, pre-treatment with AM251 (a CB1 receptor antagonist; 1 mg/kg, i.p.) antagonized the effects of acetaminophen and anandamide with no per se effect at 1 mg/kg dose, while anxiogenic effect was evident at a higher dose (5 mg/kg, i.p.). None of the treatment/s was found to induce any antinociceptive or locomotor impairment effects. In conclusion, the findings suggested that acetaminophen (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited dose dependent anxiolytic effect in mice and probably involved endocannabinoid-mediated mechanism in its effect.

Sudhir N. Umathe – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Endocannabinoids mediate anxiolytic-like effect of acetaminophen via CB1 receptors
    Progress in neuro-psychopharmacology & biological psychiatry, 2009
    Co-Authors: Sudhir N. Umathe, Shyamshree S.s. Manna, Kaweri S. Utturwar, Nishant S. Jain

    Abstract:

    Abstract Acetaminophen (Paracetamol), a most commonly used Antipyretic/Analgesic Agent, is metabolized to AM404 ( N -arachidonoylphenolamine) that inhibits uptake and degradation of anandamide which is reported to mediate the Analgesic action of acetaminophen via CB1 receptor. AM404 and anandamide are also reported to produce anxiolytic-like behavior. In view of the implication of endocannabinoids in the effect of acetaminophen, we contemplated that acetaminophen may have anxiolytic-like effect. Therefore, this possibility was tested by observing the effects of various doses of acetaminophen in mice on anxiety-related indices of Vogel conflict test and social interaction test. The results from both the tests indicated that acetaminophen (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg, i.p.) or anandamide (10 or 20 µg/mouse, i.c.v.) dose dependently elicited anxiolytic-like effect, that was comparable to diazepam (2 mg/kg, i.p.). Moreover, co-administration of sub-effective dose of acetaminophen (25 mg/kg, i.p.) and anandamide (5 µg/mouse, i.c.v) produced similar anxiolytic effect. Further, pre-treatment with AM251 (a CB1 receptor antagonist; 1 mg/kg, i.p.) antagonized the effects of acetaminophen and anandamide with no per se effect at 1 mg/kg dose, while anxiogenic effect was evident at a higher dose (5 mg/kg, i.p.). None of the treatment/s was found to induce any antinociceptive or locomotor impairment effects. In conclusion, the findings suggested that acetaminophen (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited dose dependent anxiolytic effect in mice and probably involved endocannabinoid-mediated mechanism in its effect.

Kaweri S. Utturwar – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Endocannabinoids mediate anxiolytic-like effect of acetaminophen via CB1 receptors
    Progress in neuro-psychopharmacology & biological psychiatry, 2009
    Co-Authors: Sudhir N. Umathe, Shyamshree S.s. Manna, Kaweri S. Utturwar, Nishant S. Jain

    Abstract:

    Abstract Acetaminophen (Paracetamol), a most commonly used Antipyretic/Analgesic Agent, is metabolized to AM404 ( N -arachidonoylphenolamine) that inhibits uptake and degradation of anandamide which is reported to mediate the Analgesic action of acetaminophen via CB1 receptor. AM404 and anandamide are also reported to produce anxiolytic-like behavior. In view of the implication of endocannabinoids in the effect of acetaminophen, we contemplated that acetaminophen may have anxiolytic-like effect. Therefore, this possibility was tested by observing the effects of various doses of acetaminophen in mice on anxiety-related indices of Vogel conflict test and social interaction test. The results from both the tests indicated that acetaminophen (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg, i.p.) or anandamide (10 or 20 µg/mouse, i.c.v.) dose dependently elicited anxiolytic-like effect, that was comparable to diazepam (2 mg/kg, i.p.). Moreover, co-administration of sub-effective dose of acetaminophen (25 mg/kg, i.p.) and anandamide (5 µg/mouse, i.c.v) produced similar anxiolytic effect. Further, pre-treatment with AM251 (a CB1 receptor antagonist; 1 mg/kg, i.p.) antagonized the effects of acetaminophen and anandamide with no per se effect at 1 mg/kg dose, while anxiogenic effect was evident at a higher dose (5 mg/kg, i.p.). None of the treatment/s was found to induce any antinociceptive or locomotor impairment effects. In conclusion, the findings suggested that acetaminophen (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited dose dependent anxiolytic effect in mice and probably involved endocannabinoid-mediated mechanism in its effect.