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Antisocial Behavior

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Paul J. Frick – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Early Identification and Treatment of Antisocial Behavior.
    Pediatric Clinics of North America, 2016
    Co-Authors: Paul J. Frick

    Abstract:

    Severe and persistent Antisocial Behavior is a prevalent, serious, and costly mental health problem. Individuals who are most likely to show persistent Antisocial Behavior through adolescence and into adulthood often show patterns of severe and varied conduct problems early in childhood. Treatments that intervene early in the development of these problems are most effective and least costly. Furthermore, there appear to be several common causal pathways that differ in their genetic, emotional, cognitive, and contextual characteristics. These pathways are differentiated by the level of callous-unemotional traits displayed by the individual.

  • Antisocial Behavior from a developmental psychopathology perspective
    Development and Psychopathology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Paul J. Frick, Essi Viding

    Abstract:

    This paper reviews research on chronic patterns of Antisocial Behavior and places this research into a developmental psychopathologyframework.Specifically,researchsuggeststhatthereareatleastthreeimportantpathwaysthroughwhich children and adolescents can develop severe Antisocial Behaviors. One group of youth shows Antisocial Behavior that begins in adolescence, and two groups show Antisocial Behavior that begins in childhood but differ on the presence or absence of callous–unemotional traits. In outlining these distinct pathways to Antisocial Behavior, we have tried to illustrate some key concepts from developmental psychopathology such as equifinality and multifinality, the importance of understanding the interface between normal and abnormal development, and the importance of using multiple levels of analyses to advance causal theories. Finally, we discuss how this development model can be used to enhance existing interventions for Antisocial individuals. The study of Antisocial, criminal, and aggressive Behaviors has a long and rich research history (Binder, 1987). This intensive focus from research is not surprising given that these Behaviors often operate at a very high cost to society, such as costs to victims of these Behaviors and the costs associated with detaining individuals in an effort to protect potential future victims (Krug, Dahlberg, Mercy, Zwi, & Lozano, 2002; Loeber & Farrington, 2001). Of importance, these Behaviors have been studied from a number of different perspectives, including anthropological, evolutionary, sociological, psychological, and biological perspectives, to name a few. Research from each of these disciplines provides a unique perspective for understanding the course, causes, and most effective interventions for individuals who show severe Antisocial Behaviors. In this paper, and in fitting with this special section, we take a developmental psychopathology approach for integrating the large and diverse research literature on Antisocial Behavior, used broadly to refer to criminal and aggressive Behaviors, as well as other Behaviors that violate the rights of others or major societal norms. We think that a developmental psychopathology approach for integrating this research could be important forat least two reasons. First, a developmental psychopathology framework provides a very useful way for integrating the diverse research literatures into a coherent causal model. This can help us to understand the developmental mechanisms that can lead to Antisocial Behavior patterns and to translate this research into implications for prevention and treatment. Second, research on AntisocialBehaviorprovidesaclearwayofillustrating the importance of several key developmental psychopathology concepts, such as equifinality and multifinality, the importance of integrating research onbothnormalandabnormaldevelopment,andthe importance of integrating multiple level of analyses (e.g., neurological, social, cognitive, Behavioral) for understanding psychopathological conditions. One broad question that is often raised in taking a developmental psychopathology perspective on Antisocial Behavior is whether or

  • Antisocial Behavior from a developmental psychopathology perspective
    Development and Psychopathology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Paul J. Frick, Essi Viding

    Abstract:

    This paper reviews research on chronic patterns of Antisocial Behavior and places this research into a developmental psychopathology framework. Specifically, research suggests that there are at least three important pathways through which children and adolescents can develop severe Antisocial Behaviors. One group of youth shows Antisocial Behavior that begins in adolescence, and two groups show Antisocial Behavior that begins in childhood but differ on the presence or absence of callous-unemotional traits. In outlining these distinct pathways to Antisocial Behavior, we have tried to illustrate some key concepts from developmental psychopathology such as equifinality and multifinality, the importance of understanding the interface between normal and abnormal development, and the importance of using multiple levels of analyses to advance causal theories. Finally, we discuss how this development model can be used to enhance existing interventions for Antisocial individuals.

Madeline M Carrig – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • substance abuse hinders desistance in young adults Antisocial Behavior
    Development and Psychopathology, 2004
    Co-Authors: Andrea M Hussong, Terrie E. Moffitt, Avshalom Caspi, Patrick J Curran, Madeline M Carrig

    Abstract:

    We examined two hypotheses about the developmental relation between substance abuse and individual differences in desistance from Antisocial Behavior during young adulthood. The “snares” hypothesis posits that substance abuse should result in time-specific elevations in Antisocial Behavior relative to an individual’s own developmental trajectory of Antisocial Behavior, whereas the “launch” hypothesis posits that substance abuse early in young adulthood slows an individual’s overall pattern of crime desistance relative to the population norm during this developmental period. We conducted latent trajectory analyses to test these hypotheses using interview data about Antisocial Behaviors and substance abuse assessed at ages 18, 21, and 26 in men from the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study (N = 461). We found significant individual variability in initial levels and rates of change in Antisocial Behavior over time as well as support for both the snares hypothesis and the launch hypothesis as explanations for the developmental relation between substance abuse and crime desistance in young men.

Essi Viding – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Antisocial Behavior from a developmental psychopathology perspective
    Development and Psychopathology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Paul J. Frick, Essi Viding

    Abstract:

    This paper reviews research on chronic patterns of Antisocial Behavior and places this research into a developmental psychopathologyframework.Specifically,researchsuggeststhatthereareatleastthreeimportantpathwaysthroughwhich children and adolescents can develop severe Antisocial Behaviors. One group of youth shows Antisocial Behavior that begins in adolescence, and two groups show Antisocial Behavior that begins in childhood but differ on the presence or absence of callous–unemotional traits. In outlining these distinct pathways to Antisocial Behavior, we have tried to illustrate some key concepts from developmental psychopathology such as equifinality and multifinality, the importance of understanding the interface between normal and abnormal development, and the importance of using multiple levels of analyses to advance causal theories. Finally, we discuss how this development model can be used to enhance existing interventions for Antisocial individuals. The study of Antisocial, criminal, and aggressive Behaviors has a long and rich research history (Binder, 1987). This intensive focus from research is not surprising given that these Behaviors often operate at a very high cost to society, such as costs to victims of these Behaviors and the costs associated with detaining individuals in an effort to protect potential future victims (Krug, Dahlberg, Mercy, Zwi, & Lozano, 2002; Loeber & Farrington, 2001). Of importance, these Behaviors have been studied from a number of different perspectives, including anthropological, evolutionary, sociological, psychological, and biological perspectives, to name a few. Research from each of these disciplines provides a unique perspective for understanding the course, causes, and most effective interventions for individuals who show severe Antisocial Behaviors. In this paper, and in fitting with this special section, we take a developmental psychopathology approach for integrating the large and diverse research literature on Antisocial Behavior, used broadly to refer to criminal and aggressive Behaviors, as well as other Behaviors that violate the rights of others or major societal norms. We think that a developmental psychopathology approach for integrating this research could be important forat least two reasons. First, a developmental psychopathology framework provides a very useful way for integrating the diverse research literatures into a coherent causal model. This can help us to understand the developmental mechanisms that can lead to Antisocial Behavior patterns and to translate this research into implications for prevention and treatment. Second, research on AntisocialBehaviorprovidesaclearwayofillustrating the importance of several key developmental psychopathology concepts, such as equifinality and multifinality, the importance of integrating research onbothnormalandabnormaldevelopment,andthe importance of integrating multiple level of analyses (e.g., neurological, social, cognitive, Behavioral) for understanding psychopathological conditions. One broad question that is often raised in taking a developmental psychopathology perspective on Antisocial Behavior is whether or

  • Antisocial Behavior from a developmental psychopathology perspective
    Development and Psychopathology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Paul J. Frick, Essi Viding

    Abstract:

    This paper reviews research on chronic patterns of Antisocial Behavior and places this research into a developmental psychopathology framework. Specifically, research suggests that there are at least three important pathways through which children and adolescents can develop severe Antisocial Behaviors. One group of youth shows Antisocial Behavior that begins in adolescence, and two groups show Antisocial Behavior that begins in childhood but differ on the presence or absence of callous-unemotional traits. In outlining these distinct pathways to Antisocial Behavior, we have tried to illustrate some key concepts from developmental psychopathology such as equifinality and multifinality, the importance of understanding the interface between normal and abnormal development, and the importance of using multiple levels of analyses to advance causal theories. Finally, we discuss how this development model can be used to enhance existing interventions for Antisocial individuals.