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Anxiolytic

The Experts below are selected from a list of 297 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

David A. Camfield – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Plant-Based Medicines for Anxiety Disorders, Part 2: A Review of Clinical Studies with Supporting Preclinical Evidence
    CNS Drugs, 2013
    Co-Authors: Jerome Sarris, Erica Mcintyre, David A. Camfield

    Abstract:

    Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has revealed a variety of promising medicines that may provide benefit in the treatment of general anxiety and specific anxiety disorders. However, a comprehensive review of plant-based Anxiolytics has been absent to date. Thus, our aim was to provide a comprehensive narrative review of plant-based medicines that have clinical and/or preclinical evidence of Anxiolytic activity. We present the article in two parts. In part one, we reviewed herbal medicines for which only preclinical investigations for Anxiolytic activity have been performed. In this current article (part two), we review herbal medicines for which there have been both preclinical and clinical investigations of Anxiolytic activity. A search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Scopus and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to 28 October 2012) for English language papers using the search terms ‘anxiety’ OR ‘anxiety disorder’ OR ‘generalized anxiety disorder’ OR ‘social phobia’ OR ‘post-traumatic stress disorder’ OR ‘panic disorder’ OR ‘agoraphobia’ OR ‘obsessive compulsive disorder’ in combination with the search terms ‘Herb*’ OR ‘Medicinal Plants’ OR ‘Botanical Medicine’ OR ‘Chinese herb*’, in addition to individual herbal medicines. This search of the literature revealed 1,525 papers, of which 53 plants were included in the review (having at least one study using the whole plant extract). Of these plants, 21 had human clinical trial evidence (reviewed here in part two), with the other 32 having solely preclinical evidence (reviewed in part one). Support for efficacy was found for chronic use (i.e. greater than one day) of the following herbs in treating a range of anxiety disorders in human clinical trials: Piper methysticum, Matricaria recutita, Ginkgo biloba, Scutellaria lateriflora , Silybum marianum, Passiflora incarnata, Withania somniferum, Galphimia glauca, Centella asiatica, Rhodiola rosea, Echinacea spp., Melissa officinalis and Echium amoenum . For several of the plants studied, conclusions need to be tempered due to methodological issues such as small sample sizes, brief intervention durations and non-replication. Current evidence does not support Hypericum perforatum or Valeriana spp. for any anxiety disorder. Acute Anxiolytic activity was found for Centella asiatica, Salvia spp., Melissa officinalis, Passiflora incarnata and Citrus aurantium. Bacopa monnieri has shown Anxiolytic effects in people with cognitive decline. The therapeutic application of psychotropic plant-based treatments for anxiety disorders is also discussed, specifically Psychotria viridis and Banisteriopsis caarti (ayahuasca), Psilocybe spp. and cannabidiol-enriched (low tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ^9-THC)) Cannabis spp.

  • Plant-Based Medicines for Anxiety Disorders, Part 1
    CNS Drugs, 2013
    Co-Authors: Jerome Sarris, Erica Mcintyre, David A. Camfield

    Abstract:

    Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has revealed a variety of promising medicines that may provide benefit in the treatment of general anxiety and specific anxiety disorders. However, a comprehensive review of plant-based Anxiolytics has been absent to date. This article (part 1) reviews herbal medicines for which only preclinical investigations for Anxiolytic activity have been performed. In part 2, we review herbal medicines for which there have been clinical investigations for Anxiolytic activity. An open-ended, language-restricted (English) search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Scopus and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to 28 October 2012) using specific search criteria to identify herbal medicines that have been investigated for Anxiolytic activity. This search of the literature revealed 1,525 papers, from which 53 herbal medicines were included in the full review (having at least one study using the whole plant extract). Of these plants, 21 had human clinical trial evidence (reviewed in part 2), with another 32 having solely preclinical studies (reviewed here in part 1). Preclinical evidence of Anxiolytic activity (without human clinical trials) was found for Albizia julibrissin , Sonchus oleraceus , Uncaria rhynchophylla , Stachys lavandulifolia , Cecropia glazioui , Magnolia spp., Eschscholzia californica , Erythrina spp., Annona spp., Rubus brasiliensis , Apocynum venetum , Nauclea latifolia , Equisetum arvense , Tilia spp., Securidaca longepedunculata , Achillea millefolium , Leea indica , Juncus effusus , Coriandrum sativum , Eurycoma longifolia , Turnera diffusa , Euphorbia hirta , Justicia spp., Crocus sativus , Aloysia polystachya , Albies pindrow , Casimiroa edulis , Davilla rugosa , Gastrodia elata , Sphaerathus indicus , Zizyphus jujuba and Panax ginseng . Common mechanisms of action for the majority of botanicals reviewed primarily involve GABA, either via direct receptor binding or ionic channel or cell membrane modulation; GABA transaminase or glutamic acid decarboxylase inhibition; a range of monoaminergic effects; and potential cannabinoid receptor modulation. Future research should focus on conducting human clinical trials on the plants reviewed with promising Anxiolytic activity.

  • Plant-based medicines for anxiety disorders, part 1: A review of preclinical studies
    CNS Drugs, 2013
    Co-Authors: Jerome Sarris, Erica Mcintyre, David A. Camfield

    Abstract:

    Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has revealed a variety of promising medicines that may provide benefit in the treatment of general anxiety and specific anxiety disorders. However, a comprehensive review of plant-based Anxiolytics has been absent to date. This article (part 1) reviews herbal medicines for which only preclinical investigations for Anxiolytic activity have been performed. In part 2, we review herbal medicines for which there have been clinical investigations for Anxiolytic activity. An open-ended, language-restricted (English) search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Scopus and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to 28 October 2012) using specific search criteria to identify herbal medicines that have been investigated for Anxiolytic activity. This search of the literature revealed 1,525 papers, from which 53 herbal medicines were included in the full review (having at least one study using the whole plant extract). Of these plants, 21 had human clinical trial evidence (reviewed in part 2), with another 32 having solely preclinical studies (reviewed here in part 1). Preclinical evidence of Anxiolytic activity (without human clinical trials) was found for Albizia julibrissin, Sonchus oleraceus, Uncaria rhynchophylla, Stachys lavandulifolia, Cecropia glazioui, Magnolia spp., Eschscholzia californica, Erythrina spp., Annona spp., Rubus brasiliensis, Apocynum venetum, Nauclea latifolia, Equisetum arvense, Tilia spp., Securidaca longepedunculata, Achillea millefolium, Leea indica, Juncus effusus, Coriandrum sativum, Eurycoma longifolia, Turnera diffusa, Euphorbia hirta, Justicia spp., Crocus sativus, Aloysia polystachya, Albies pindrow, Casimiroa edulis, Davilla rugosa, Gastrodia elata, Sphaerathus indicus, Zizyphus jujuba and Panax ginseng. Common mechanisms of action for the majority of botanicals reviewed primarily involve GABA, either via direct receptor binding or ionic channel or cell membrane modulation; GABA transaminase or glutamic acid decarboxylase inhibition; a range of monoaminergic effects; and potential cannabinoid receptor modulation. Future research should focus on conducting human clinical trials on the plants reviewed with promising Anxiolytic activity.

Jerome Sarris – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Plant-Based Medicines for Anxiety Disorders, Part 2: A Review of Clinical Studies with Supporting Preclinical Evidence
    CNS Drugs, 2013
    Co-Authors: Jerome Sarris, Erica Mcintyre, David A. Camfield

    Abstract:

    Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has revealed a variety of promising medicines that may provide benefit in the treatment of general anxiety and specific anxiety disorders. However, a comprehensive review of plant-based Anxiolytics has been absent to date. Thus, our aim was to provide a comprehensive narrative review of plant-based medicines that have clinical and/or preclinical evidence of Anxiolytic activity. We present the article in two parts. In part one, we reviewed herbal medicines for which only preclinical investigations for Anxiolytic activity have been performed. In this current article (part two), we review herbal medicines for which there have been both preclinical and clinical investigations of Anxiolytic activity. A search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Scopus and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to 28 October 2012) for English language papers using the search terms ‘anxiety’ OR ‘anxiety disorder’ OR ‘generalized anxiety disorder’ OR ‘social phobia’ OR ‘post-traumatic stress disorder’ OR ‘panic disorder’ OR ‘agoraphobia’ OR ‘obsessive compulsive disorder’ in combination with the search terms ‘Herb*’ OR ‘Medicinal Plants’ OR ‘Botanical Medicine’ OR ‘Chinese herb*’, in addition to individual herbal medicines. This search of the literature revealed 1,525 papers, of which 53 plants were included in the review (having at least one study using the whole plant extract). Of these plants, 21 had human clinical trial evidence (reviewed here in part two), with the other 32 having solely preclinical evidence (reviewed in part one). Support for efficacy was found for chronic use (i.e. greater than one day) of the following herbs in treating a range of anxiety disorders in human clinical trials: Piper methysticum, Matricaria recutita, Ginkgo biloba, Scutellaria lateriflora , Silybum marianum, Passiflora incarnata, Withania somniferum, Galphimia glauca, Centella asiatica, Rhodiola rosea, Echinacea spp., Melissa officinalis and Echium amoenum . For several of the plants studied, conclusions need to be tempered due to methodological issues such as small sample sizes, brief intervention durations and non-replication. Current evidence does not support Hypericum perforatum or Valeriana spp. for any anxiety disorder. Acute Anxiolytic activity was found for Centella asiatica, Salvia spp., Melissa officinalis, Passiflora incarnata and Citrus aurantium. Bacopa monnieri has shown Anxiolytic effects in people with cognitive decline. The therapeutic application of psychotropic plant-based treatments for anxiety disorders is also discussed, specifically Psychotria viridis and Banisteriopsis caarti (ayahuasca), Psilocybe spp. and cannabidiol-enriched (low tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ^9-THC)) Cannabis spp.

  • Plant-Based Medicines for Anxiety Disorders, Part 1
    CNS Drugs, 2013
    Co-Authors: Jerome Sarris, Erica Mcintyre, David A. Camfield

    Abstract:

    Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has revealed a variety of promising medicines that may provide benefit in the treatment of general anxiety and specific anxiety disorders. However, a comprehensive review of plant-based Anxiolytics has been absent to date. This article (part 1) reviews herbal medicines for which only preclinical investigations for Anxiolytic activity have been performed. In part 2, we review herbal medicines for which there have been clinical investigations for Anxiolytic activity. An open-ended, language-restricted (English) search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Scopus and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to 28 October 2012) using specific search criteria to identify herbal medicines that have been investigated for Anxiolytic activity. This search of the literature revealed 1,525 papers, from which 53 herbal medicines were included in the full review (having at least one study using the whole plant extract). Of these plants, 21 had human clinical trial evidence (reviewed in part 2), with another 32 having solely preclinical studies (reviewed here in part 1). Preclinical evidence of Anxiolytic activity (without human clinical trials) was found for Albizia julibrissin , Sonchus oleraceus , Uncaria rhynchophylla , Stachys lavandulifolia , Cecropia glazioui , Magnolia spp., Eschscholzia californica , Erythrina spp., Annona spp., Rubus brasiliensis , Apocynum venetum , Nauclea latifolia , Equisetum arvense , Tilia spp., Securidaca longepedunculata , Achillea millefolium , Leea indica , Juncus effusus , Coriandrum sativum , Eurycoma longifolia , Turnera diffusa , Euphorbia hirta , Justicia spp., Crocus sativus , Aloysia polystachya , Albies pindrow , Casimiroa edulis , Davilla rugosa , Gastrodia elata , Sphaerathus indicus , Zizyphus jujuba and Panax ginseng . Common mechanisms of action for the majority of botanicals reviewed primarily involve GABA, either via direct receptor binding or ionic channel or cell membrane modulation; GABA transaminase or glutamic acid decarboxylase inhibition; a range of monoaminergic effects; and potential cannabinoid receptor modulation. Future research should focus on conducting human clinical trials on the plants reviewed with promising Anxiolytic activity.

  • Plant-based medicines for anxiety disorders, part 1: A review of preclinical studies
    CNS Drugs, 2013
    Co-Authors: Jerome Sarris, Erica Mcintyre, David A. Camfield

    Abstract:

    Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has revealed a variety of promising medicines that may provide benefit in the treatment of general anxiety and specific anxiety disorders. However, a comprehensive review of plant-based Anxiolytics has been absent to date. This article (part 1) reviews herbal medicines for which only preclinical investigations for Anxiolytic activity have been performed. In part 2, we review herbal medicines for which there have been clinical investigations for Anxiolytic activity. An open-ended, language-restricted (English) search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Scopus and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to 28 October 2012) using specific search criteria to identify herbal medicines that have been investigated for Anxiolytic activity. This search of the literature revealed 1,525 papers, from which 53 herbal medicines were included in the full review (having at least one study using the whole plant extract). Of these plants, 21 had human clinical trial evidence (reviewed in part 2), with another 32 having solely preclinical studies (reviewed here in part 1). Preclinical evidence of Anxiolytic activity (without human clinical trials) was found for Albizia julibrissin, Sonchus oleraceus, Uncaria rhynchophylla, Stachys lavandulifolia, Cecropia glazioui, Magnolia spp., Eschscholzia californica, Erythrina spp., Annona spp., Rubus brasiliensis, Apocynum venetum, Nauclea latifolia, Equisetum arvense, Tilia spp., Securidaca longepedunculata, Achillea millefolium, Leea indica, Juncus effusus, Coriandrum sativum, Eurycoma longifolia, Turnera diffusa, Euphorbia hirta, Justicia spp., Crocus sativus, Aloysia polystachya, Albies pindrow, Casimiroa edulis, Davilla rugosa, Gastrodia elata, Sphaerathus indicus, Zizyphus jujuba and Panax ginseng. Common mechanisms of action for the majority of botanicals reviewed primarily involve GABA, either via direct receptor binding or ionic channel or cell membrane modulation; GABA transaminase or glutamic acid decarboxylase inhibition; a range of monoaminergic effects; and potential cannabinoid receptor modulation. Future research should focus on conducting human clinical trials on the plants reviewed with promising Anxiolytic activity.

Erica Mcintyre – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Plant-Based Medicines for Anxiety Disorders, Part 2: A Review of Clinical Studies with Supporting Preclinical Evidence
    CNS Drugs, 2013
    Co-Authors: Jerome Sarris, Erica Mcintyre, David A. Camfield

    Abstract:

    Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has revealed a variety of promising medicines that may provide benefit in the treatment of general anxiety and specific anxiety disorders. However, a comprehensive review of plant-based Anxiolytics has been absent to date. Thus, our aim was to provide a comprehensive narrative review of plant-based medicines that have clinical and/or preclinical evidence of Anxiolytic activity. We present the article in two parts. In part one, we reviewed herbal medicines for which only preclinical investigations for Anxiolytic activity have been performed. In this current article (part two), we review herbal medicines for which there have been both preclinical and clinical investigations of Anxiolytic activity. A search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Scopus and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to 28 October 2012) for English language papers using the search terms ‘anxiety’ OR ‘anxiety disorder’ OR ‘generalized anxiety disorder’ OR ‘social phobia’ OR ‘post-traumatic stress disorder’ OR ‘panic disorder’ OR ‘agoraphobia’ OR ‘obsessive compulsive disorder’ in combination with the search terms ‘Herb*’ OR ‘Medicinal Plants’ OR ‘Botanical Medicine’ OR ‘Chinese herb*’, in addition to individual herbal medicines. This search of the literature revealed 1,525 papers, of which 53 plants were included in the review (having at least one study using the whole plant extract). Of these plants, 21 had human clinical trial evidence (reviewed here in part two), with the other 32 having solely preclinical evidence (reviewed in part one). Support for efficacy was found for chronic use (i.e. greater than one day) of the following herbs in treating a range of anxiety disorders in human clinical trials: Piper methysticum, Matricaria recutita, Ginkgo biloba, Scutellaria lateriflora , Silybum marianum, Passiflora incarnata, Withania somniferum, Galphimia glauca, Centella asiatica, Rhodiola rosea, Echinacea spp., Melissa officinalis and Echium amoenum . For several of the plants studied, conclusions need to be tempered due to methodological issues such as small sample sizes, brief intervention durations and non-replication. Current evidence does not support Hypericum perforatum or Valeriana spp. for any anxiety disorder. Acute Anxiolytic activity was found for Centella asiatica, Salvia spp., Melissa officinalis, Passiflora incarnata and Citrus aurantium. Bacopa monnieri has shown Anxiolytic effects in people with cognitive decline. The therapeutic application of psychotropic plant-based treatments for anxiety disorders is also discussed, specifically Psychotria viridis and Banisteriopsis caarti (ayahuasca), Psilocybe spp. and cannabidiol-enriched (low tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ^9-THC)) Cannabis spp.

  • Plant-Based Medicines for Anxiety Disorders, Part 1
    CNS Drugs, 2013
    Co-Authors: Jerome Sarris, Erica Mcintyre, David A. Camfield

    Abstract:

    Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has revealed a variety of promising medicines that may provide benefit in the treatment of general anxiety and specific anxiety disorders. However, a comprehensive review of plant-based Anxiolytics has been absent to date. This article (part 1) reviews herbal medicines for which only preclinical investigations for Anxiolytic activity have been performed. In part 2, we review herbal medicines for which there have been clinical investigations for Anxiolytic activity. An open-ended, language-restricted (English) search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Scopus and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to 28 October 2012) using specific search criteria to identify herbal medicines that have been investigated for Anxiolytic activity. This search of the literature revealed 1,525 papers, from which 53 herbal medicines were included in the full review (having at least one study using the whole plant extract). Of these plants, 21 had human clinical trial evidence (reviewed in part 2), with another 32 having solely preclinical studies (reviewed here in part 1). Preclinical evidence of Anxiolytic activity (without human clinical trials) was found for Albizia julibrissin , Sonchus oleraceus , Uncaria rhynchophylla , Stachys lavandulifolia , Cecropia glazioui , Magnolia spp., Eschscholzia californica , Erythrina spp., Annona spp., Rubus brasiliensis , Apocynum venetum , Nauclea latifolia , Equisetum arvense , Tilia spp., Securidaca longepedunculata , Achillea millefolium , Leea indica , Juncus effusus , Coriandrum sativum , Eurycoma longifolia , Turnera diffusa , Euphorbia hirta , Justicia spp., Crocus sativus , Aloysia polystachya , Albies pindrow , Casimiroa edulis , Davilla rugosa , Gastrodia elata , Sphaerathus indicus , Zizyphus jujuba and Panax ginseng . Common mechanisms of action for the majority of botanicals reviewed primarily involve GABA, either via direct receptor binding or ionic channel or cell membrane modulation; GABA transaminase or glutamic acid decarboxylase inhibition; a range of monoaminergic effects; and potential cannabinoid receptor modulation. Future research should focus on conducting human clinical trials on the plants reviewed with promising Anxiolytic activity.

  • Plant-based medicines for anxiety disorders, part 1: A review of preclinical studies
    CNS Drugs, 2013
    Co-Authors: Jerome Sarris, Erica Mcintyre, David A. Camfield

    Abstract:

    Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has revealed a variety of promising medicines that may provide benefit in the treatment of general anxiety and specific anxiety disorders. However, a comprehensive review of plant-based Anxiolytics has been absent to date. This article (part 1) reviews herbal medicines for which only preclinical investigations for Anxiolytic activity have been performed. In part 2, we review herbal medicines for which there have been clinical investigations for Anxiolytic activity. An open-ended, language-restricted (English) search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Scopus and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to 28 October 2012) using specific search criteria to identify herbal medicines that have been investigated for Anxiolytic activity. This search of the literature revealed 1,525 papers, from which 53 herbal medicines were included in the full review (having at least one study using the whole plant extract). Of these plants, 21 had human clinical trial evidence (reviewed in part 2), with another 32 having solely preclinical studies (reviewed here in part 1). Preclinical evidence of Anxiolytic activity (without human clinical trials) was found for Albizia julibrissin, Sonchus oleraceus, Uncaria rhynchophylla, Stachys lavandulifolia, Cecropia glazioui, Magnolia spp., Eschscholzia californica, Erythrina spp., Annona spp., Rubus brasiliensis, Apocynum venetum, Nauclea latifolia, Equisetum arvense, Tilia spp., Securidaca longepedunculata, Achillea millefolium, Leea indica, Juncus effusus, Coriandrum sativum, Eurycoma longifolia, Turnera diffusa, Euphorbia hirta, Justicia spp., Crocus sativus, Aloysia polystachya, Albies pindrow, Casimiroa edulis, Davilla rugosa, Gastrodia elata, Sphaerathus indicus, Zizyphus jujuba and Panax ginseng. Common mechanisms of action for the majority of botanicals reviewed primarily involve GABA, either via direct receptor binding or ionic channel or cell membrane modulation; GABA transaminase or glutamic acid decarboxylase inhibition; a range of monoaminergic effects; and potential cannabinoid receptor modulation. Future research should focus on conducting human clinical trials on the plants reviewed with promising Anxiolytic activity.