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Christoph Bleidorn – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Phylogenomic analysis of Apoidea sheds new light on the sister group of bees
    BMC Evolutionary Biology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Manuela Sann, Oliver Niehuis, Christoph Mayer, Lars Podsiadlowski, Sarah Bank, Karen Meusemann, Bernhard Misof, Ralph S. Peters, Alexey M. Kozlov, Christoph Bleidorn
    Abstract:

    Apoid wasps and bees (Apoidea) are an ecologically and morphologically diverse group of Hymenoptera, with some species of bees having evolved eusocial societies. Major problems for our understanding of the evolutionary history of Apoidea have been the difficulty to trace the phylogenetic origin and to reliably estimate the geological age of bees. To address these issues, we compiled a comprehensive phylogenomic dataset by simultaneously analyzing target DNA enrichment and transcriptomic sequence data, comprising 195 single-copy protein-coding genes and covering all major lineages of apoid wasps and bee families. Our compiled data matrix comprised 284,607 nucleotide sites that we phylogenetically analyzed by applying a combination of domain- and codon-based partitioning schemes. The inferred results confirm the polyphyletic status of the former family “Crabronidae”, which comprises nine major monophyletic lineages. We found the former subfamily Pemphredoninae to be polyphyletic, comprising three distantly related clades. One of them, Ammoplanina, constituted the sister group of bees in all our analyses. We estimate the origin of bees to be in the Early Cretaceous (ca. 128 million years ago), a time period during which angiosperms rapidly radiated. Finally, our phylogenetic analyses revealed that within the Apoidea, (eu)social societies evolved exclusively in a single clade that comprises pemphredonine and philanthine wasps as well as bees. By combining transcriptomic sequences with those obtained via target DNA enrichment, we were able to include an unprecedented large number of apoid wasps in a phylogenetic study for tracing the phylogenetic origin of bees. Our results confirm the polyphyletic nature of the former wasp family Crabonidae, which we here suggest splitting into eight families. Of these, the family Ammoplanidae possibly represents the extant sister lineage of bees. Species of Ammoplanidae are known to hunt thrips, of which some aggregate on flowers and feed on pollen. The specific biology of Ammoplanidae as predators indicates how the transition from a predatory to pollen-collecting life style could have taken place in the evolution of bees. This insight plus the finding that (eu)social societies evolved exclusively in a single subordinated lineage of apoid wasps provides new perspectives for future comparative studies.

  • Additional file 2: of Phylogenomic analysis of Apoidea sheds new light on the sister group of bees
    , 2018
    Co-Authors: Manuela Sann, Oliver Niehuis, Ralph Peters, Christoph Mayer, Alexey Kozlov, Lars Podsiadlowski, Sarah Bank, Karen Meusemann, Bernhard Misof, Christoph Bleidorn
    Abstract:

    Figure S1. Ultrametric and time-calibrated tree of Apoidea estimated using a relaxed molecular clock approach as implemented in MCMCtree. The estimates are based on the analysis of 284,607 nucleotide sites and applying a combination of protein domain – and codon-based partitioning scheme by modelling 1st, 2nd and 3rd codon positions separately. Figure S2. Phylogenetic relationships of Apoidea. The phylogenetic tree was inferred from analyzing 94,869 amino acid sites under the maximum likelihood (ML) optimality criterion. The data matrix was partitioned based on a protein domain-based partitioning scheme and analyzed with partition-specific substitution models. Node labels indicate bootstrap branch support values derived from 150 bootstrap replicates. Figure S2.1. Phylogenetic relationships of Apoidea. The phylogenetic tree was inferred with ExaBayes, by analyzing 94,869 amino acid sites. The data matrix was partitioned based on a protein domain-based partitioning scheme and analyzed with partition-specific substitution models automatically selected by ExaBayes. Posterior probability values were inferred from a total of 13,500 sampled trees. Figure S3. Phylogenetic relationships of Apoidea. The phylogenetic tree was inferred from analyzing 284.607 nucleotide sites under the maximum likelihood (ML) optimality criterion. The data matrix was partitioned based on applying a combination of protein domain – and codon-based partitioning scheme by modelling 1st and 2nd codon positions separately and excluding the 3rd codon positions. Each partition was analyzed with the partition-specific model parameters under the nucleotide substitution model GTR + G. Node labels indicate bootstrap branch support values derived from 150 bootstrap replicates. Figure S3.1. Phylogenetic relationships of Apoidea. The phylogenetic tree was inferred with ExaBayes, by analyzing 284.607 nucleotide sites. The data matrix was partitioned based on applying a combination of protein domain – and codon-based partitioning scheme by modelling 1st and 2nd codon positions separately and excluding the 3rd codon positions. Each partition was analyzed with the partition-specific model parameters under the nucleotide substitution model GTR + G. Posterior probability values were inferred from a total of 13,500 sampled trees. Figure S4. Phylogenetic relationships of Apoidea. The phylogenetic tree inferred from analyzing 284.607 nucleotide sites under the maximum likelihood (ML) optimality criterion. The data matrix was partitioned based on applying a combination of protein domain – and codon-based partitioning scheme by modelling the 1st, 2nd and 3rd codon position separately. Each partition was analyzed with partition-specific model parameters under the nucleotide substitution model GTR + G. Node labels indicate bootstrap branch support values derived from 100 bootstrap replicates. Figure S4.1. Phylogenetic relationships of Apoidea. The phylogenetic tree was inferred with ExaBayes, by analyzing 284.607 nucleotide sites. The data matrix was partitioned based on applying a combination of protein domain– and codon-based partitioning scheme by modelling the 1st, 2nd and 3rd codon position separately. Each partition was analyzed with partition-specific model parameters under the nucleotide substitution model GTR + G. Posterior probability values were inferred from a total of 13,500 sampled trees. Figure S5. Comparison of divergence times and confidence intervals from four independent dating analyses conducted from with MCMCtree. Differences in the results hint at differences in the convergence of the MCMC method. The closer the dots are to the angle bisector, the more similar the estimates are for the two runs that are compared. Figure S6. Results from Bowker’s matched-pairs test of symmetry. Heat maps showing the results from pairwise comparison of aligned a) amino acid dataset and b) nucleotide dataset with all three codon positions included (PF-NT-1,2,3). White cells specify p-values > 0.05, indicating that corresponding pairs of nucleotide or amino acid sequences do not violate the assumption of global stationary, reversibility, and homogeneity (SRH) conditions. (PDF 1011 kb

  • Phylogenomic analysis of Apoidea sheds new light on the sister group of bees
    BMC, 2018
    Co-Authors: Manuela Sann, Oliver Niehuis, Christoph Mayer, Alexey Kozlov, Lars Podsiadlowski, Sarah Bank, Karen Meusemann, Bernhard Misof, Ralph S. Peters, Christoph Bleidorn
    Abstract:

    Abstract Background Apoid wasps and bees (Apoidea) are an ecologically and morphologically diverse group of Hymenoptera, with some species of bees having evolved eusocial societies. Major problems for our understanding of the evolutionary history of Apoidea have been the difficulty to trace the phylogenetic origin and to reliably estimate the geological age of bees. To address these issues, we compiled a comprehensive phylogenomic dataset by simultaneously analyzing target DNA enrichment and transcriptomic sequence data, comprising 195 single-copy protein-coding genes and covering all major lineages of apoid wasps and bee families. Results Our compiled data matrix comprised 284,607 nucleotide sites that we phylogenetically analyzed by applying a combination of domain- and codon-based partitioning schemes. The inferred results confirm the polyphyletic status of the former family “Crabronidae”, which comprises nine major monophyletic lineages. We found the former subfamily Pemphredoninae to be polyphyletic, comprising three distantly related clades. One of them, Ammoplanina, constituted the sister group of bees in all our analyses. We estimate the origin of bees to be in the Early Cretaceous (ca. 128 million years ago), a time period during which angiosperms rapidly radiated. Finally, our phylogenetic analyses revealed that within the Apoidea, (eu)social societies evolved exclusively in a single clade that comprises pemphredonine and philanthine wasps as well as bees. Conclusion By combining transcriptomic sequences with those obtained via target DNA enrichment, we were able to include an unprecedented large number of apoid wasps in a phylogenetic study for tracing the phylogenetic origin of bees. Our results confirm the polyphyletic nature of the former wasp family Crabonidae, which we here suggest splitting into eight families. Of these, the family Ammoplanidae possibly represents the extant sister lineage of bees. Species of Ammoplanidae are known to hunt thrips, of which some aggregate on flowers and feed on pollen. The specific biology of Ammoplanidae as predators indicates how the transition from a predatory to pollen-collecting life style could have taken place in the evolution of bees. This insight plus the finding that (eu)social societies evolved exclusively in a single subordinated lineage of apoid wasps provides new perspectives for future comparative studies

Radchenko, Vladimir G. – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A new bee species of the genus Dasypoda Latreille (Hymenoptera, Apoidea) from Portugal with comparative remarks on the subgenus Heterodasypoda Michez
    , 2017
    Co-Authors: Radchenko, Vladimir G.
    Abstract:

    Radchenko, Vladimir G. (2017): A new bee species of the genus Dasypoda Latreille (Hymenoptera, Apoidea) from Portugal with comparative remarks on the subgenus Heterodasypoda Michez. Zootaxa 4350 (1): 164-176, DOI: https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4350.1.1

  • A new widespread European bee species of the genus Dasypoda Latreille (Hymenoptera, Apoidea)
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Radchenko, Vladimir G.
    Abstract:

    Radchenko, Vladimir G. (2016): A new widespread European bee species of the genus Dasypoda Latreille (Hymenoptera, Apoidea). Zootaxa 4184 (3): 491-504, DOI: http://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4184.3.

Jonathan F Colville – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the allometry of proboscis length in melittidae hymenoptera apoidae and an estimate of their foraging distance using museum collections
    PLOS ONE, 2019
    Co-Authors: Annalie Melin, Harald W Krenn, Rauri C K Bowie, Colin M Beale, J C Manning, Jonathan F Colville
    Abstract:

    An appreciation of body size allometry is central for understanding insect pollination ecology. A recent model utilises allometric coefficients for five of the seven extant bee families (Apoidea: Anthophila) to include crucial but difficult-to-measure traits, such as proboscis length, in ecological and evolutionary studies. Melittidae were not included although they are important pollinators in South Africa where they comprise an especially rich and morphologically diverse fauna. We measured intertegular distance (correlated with body size) and proboscis length of 179 specimens of 11 species from three genera of Melittidae. With the inclusion of Melittidae, we tested the between family differences in the allometric scaling coefficients. AIC model selection was used to establish which factors provide the best estimate of proboscis length. We explored a hypothesis that has been proposed in the literature, but which has not been tested, whereby body and range sizes of bees are correlated with rainfall regions. We tested this by using body size measurements of 2109 museum specimens from 56 species of Melittidae and applied the model coefficients to estimate proboscis length and foraging distance. Our results from testing differences across bee families show that with the addition of Melittidae, we retained the overall pattern of significant differences in the scaling coefficient among Apoidea, with our model explaining 98% of the variance in species-level means for proboscis length. When testing the relationship between body size and rainfall region we found no relationship for South African Melittidae. Overall, this study has added allometric scaling coefficients for an important bee family and shown the applicability of using these coefficients when linked with museum specimens to test ecological hypothesis.