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M A Rao – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Blanch Temperature/Time Effects on Rheological Properties of Applesauce
    Journal of Food Science, 1995
    Co-Authors: A. M. Godfrey Usiak, Malcolm C. Bourne, M A Rao

    Abstract:

    Peeled and cored ‘Idared’ and ‘Rome’ apples were blanched in water for 20, 40, and 60 min at 35 degrees, 47 degrees, 59 degrees, 71 degrees, and 83 degrees C prior to making into Applesauce by a conventional process each month from Nov. through March. USDA Consistometer values decreased as blanch temperature increased from 35 degrees to 59 degrees C and increased again from 71 degrees to 83 degrees C. There was little variation in flow behavior index (“n” values). Yield stress increased as blanch temperature increased from 35 degrees to 59 degrees C and decreased from 71 degrees to 83 degrees C. The consistency index (K) and serum viscosity were almost unchanged by blanching temperature but both decreased with increasing storage time of fresh fruit. Blanching apples at 59 degrees to 71 degrees C before making into Applesauce gave substantially thicker sauces than unblanched apples.

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  • blanch temperature time effects on rheological properties of Applesauce
    Journal of Food Science, 1995
    Co-Authors: A. M. Godfrey Usiak, Malcolm C. Bourne, M A Rao

    Abstract:

    Peeled and cored ‘Idared’ and ‘Rome’ apples were blanched in water for 20, 40, and 60 min at 35 degrees, 47 degrees, 59 degrees, 71 degrees, and 83 degrees C prior to making into Applesauce by a conventional process each month from Nov. through March. USDA Consistometer values decreased as blanch temperature increased from 35 degrees to 59 degrees C and increased again from 71 degrees to 83 degrees C. There was little variation in flow behavior index (“n” values). Yield stress increased as blanch temperature increased from 35 degrees to 59 degrees C and decreased from 71 degrees to 83 degrees C. The consistency index (K) and serum viscosity were almost unchanged by blanching temperature but both decreased with increasing storage time of fresh fruit. Blanching apples at 59 degrees to 71 degrees C before making into Applesauce gave substantially thicker sauces than unblanched apples.

    Free Register to Access Article

A. M. Godfrey Usiak – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Blanch Temperature/Time Effects on Rheological Properties of Applesauce
    Journal of Food Science, 1995
    Co-Authors: A. M. Godfrey Usiak, Malcolm C. Bourne, M A Rao

    Abstract:

    Peeled and cored ‘Idared’ and ‘Rome’ apples were blanched in water for 20, 40, and 60 min at 35 degrees, 47 degrees, 59 degrees, 71 degrees, and 83 degrees C prior to making into Applesauce by a conventional process each month from Nov. through March. USDA Consistometer values decreased as blanch temperature increased from 35 degrees to 59 degrees C and increased again from 71 degrees to 83 degrees C. There was little variation in flow behavior index (“n” values). Yield stress increased as blanch temperature increased from 35 degrees to 59 degrees C and decreased from 71 degrees to 83 degrees C. The consistency index (K) and serum viscosity were almost unchanged by blanching temperature but both decreased with increasing storage time of fresh fruit. Blanching apples at 59 degrees to 71 degrees C before making into Applesauce gave substantially thicker sauces than unblanched apples.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • blanch temperature time effects on rheological properties of Applesauce
    Journal of Food Science, 1995
    Co-Authors: A. M. Godfrey Usiak, Malcolm C. Bourne, M A Rao

    Abstract:

    Peeled and cored ‘Idared’ and ‘Rome’ apples were blanched in water for 20, 40, and 60 min at 35 degrees, 47 degrees, 59 degrees, 71 degrees, and 83 degrees C prior to making into Applesauce by a conventional process each month from Nov. through March. USDA Consistometer values decreased as blanch temperature increased from 35 degrees to 59 degrees C and increased again from 71 degrees to 83 degrees C. There was little variation in flow behavior index (“n” values). Yield stress increased as blanch temperature increased from 35 degrees to 59 degrees C and decreased from 71 degrees to 83 degrees C. The consistency index (K) and serum viscosity were almost unchanged by blanching temperature but both decreased with increasing storage time of fresh fruit. Blanching apples at 59 degrees to 71 degrees C before making into Applesauce gave substantially thicker sauces than unblanched apples.

    Free Register to Access Article

Malcolm C. Bourne – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Blanch Temperature/Time Effects on Rheological Properties of Applesauce
    Journal of Food Science, 1995
    Co-Authors: A. M. Godfrey Usiak, Malcolm C. Bourne, M A Rao

    Abstract:

    Peeled and cored ‘Idared’ and ‘Rome’ apples were blanched in water for 20, 40, and 60 min at 35 degrees, 47 degrees, 59 degrees, 71 degrees, and 83 degrees C prior to making into Applesauce by a conventional process each month from Nov. through March. USDA Consistometer values decreased as blanch temperature increased from 35 degrees to 59 degrees C and increased again from 71 degrees to 83 degrees C. There was little variation in flow behavior index (“n” values). Yield stress increased as blanch temperature increased from 35 degrees to 59 degrees C and decreased from 71 degrees to 83 degrees C. The consistency index (K) and serum viscosity were almost unchanged by blanching temperature but both decreased with increasing storage time of fresh fruit. Blanching apples at 59 degrees to 71 degrees C before making into Applesauce gave substantially thicker sauces than unblanched apples.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • blanch temperature time effects on rheological properties of Applesauce
    Journal of Food Science, 1995
    Co-Authors: A. M. Godfrey Usiak, Malcolm C. Bourne, M A Rao

    Abstract:

    Peeled and cored ‘Idared’ and ‘Rome’ apples were blanched in water for 20, 40, and 60 min at 35 degrees, 47 degrees, 59 degrees, 71 degrees, and 83 degrees C prior to making into Applesauce by a conventional process each month from Nov. through March. USDA Consistometer values decreased as blanch temperature increased from 35 degrees to 59 degrees C and increased again from 71 degrees to 83 degrees C. There was little variation in flow behavior index (“n” values). Yield stress increased as blanch temperature increased from 35 degrees to 59 degrees C and decreased from 71 degrees to 83 degrees C. The consistency index (K) and serum viscosity were almost unchanged by blanching temperature but both decreased with increasing storage time of fresh fruit. Blanching apples at 59 degrees to 71 degrees C before making into Applesauce gave substantially thicker sauces than unblanched apples.

    Free Register to Access Article