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Application Equipment

The Experts below are selected from a list of 258 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Kevin Oldknow – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Wayside gauge face lubrication: How much do we really understand?
    Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers Part F: Journal of Rail and Rapid Transit, 2012
    Co-Authors: Donald T. Eadie, Marco Santoro, Kevin Oldknow, Gene Kwan, Marcia Yu, Xin Lu

    Abstract:

    Wayside gauge face lubrication is widely used to minimize rail wear. Scientific understanding of this process is limited; however, there have been significant recent improvements in Application Equipment. In this paper the process is analyzed in terms of a number of interacting sub-processes, and the factors thought to be important for lubricant and Application Equipment are reviewed. Wheel/rail contact conditions (pressure and temperature) are also identified as significant variables. Grease stability and retentivity are significant factors that affect lubricant performance; however, significant knowledge gaps exist about the factors that influence grease pick up and carry down especially at the extremes of operating temperatures. Laboratory (two-roller rig measurement of retentivity) and field evaluation (rail friction measurements of carry down) gave the same relative ranking for the tested grease samples. Areas for future research in the area are identified.

  • field studies of the effect of friction modifiers on short pitch corrugation generation in curves
    Wear, 2008
    Co-Authors: Donald T. Eadie, Marco Santoro, Kevin Oldknow

    Abstract:

    Abstract This paper describes field evaluation on the effect of top of rail friction control on short pitch corrugation growth on different mass transit railways in Europe and Japan. Measurements were made during baseline conditions to evaluate the rate of growth of corrugations. Friction modifier (FM) was then applied using wayside Application Equipment, in some cases after grinding to re-establish an uncorrugated state. It was observed that FM Application reduced the rate of corrugation growth by a factor of 6–11 times. In most cases there were little or no new corrugations when FM was applied on sites that formed corrugations rapidly under baseline conditions. Modelling showed that the test sites had a range of contact conditions, indicating that the effect of FM on corrugations is insensitive to changes in profile.

  • Field studies of the effect of friction modifiers on short pitch corrugation generation in curves
    Wear, 2008
    Co-Authors: Donald T. Eadie, Marco Santoro, Kevin Oldknow, Yasushi Oka

    Abstract:

    This paper describes field evaluation on the effect of top of rail friction control on short pitch corrugation growth on different mass transit railways in Europe and Japan. Measurements were made during baseline conditions to evaluate the rate of growth of corrugations. Friction modifier (FM) was then applied using wayside Application Equipment, in some cases after grinding to re-establish an uncorrugated state. It was observed that FM Application reduced the rate of corrugation growth by a factor of 6-11 times. In most cases there were little or no new corrugations when FM was applied on sites that formed corrugations rapidly under baseline conditions. Modelling showed that the test sites had a range of contact conditions, indicating that the effect of FM on corrugations is insensitive to changes in profile. © 2008 Donald T. Eadie.

Donald T. Eadie – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Wayside gauge face lubrication: How much do we really understand?
    Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers Part F: Journal of Rail and Rapid Transit, 2012
    Co-Authors: Donald T. Eadie, Marco Santoro, Kevin Oldknow, Gene Kwan, Marcia Yu, Xin Lu

    Abstract:

    Wayside gauge face lubrication is widely used to minimize rail wear. Scientific understanding of this process is limited; however, there have been significant recent improvements in Application Equipment. In this paper the process is analyzed in terms of a number of interacting sub-processes, and the factors thought to be important for lubricant and Application Equipment are reviewed. Wheel/rail contact conditions (pressure and temperature) are also identified as significant variables. Grease stability and retentivity are significant factors that affect lubricant performance; however, significant knowledge gaps exist about the factors that influence grease pick up and carry down especially at the extremes of operating temperatures. Laboratory (two-roller rig measurement of retentivity) and field evaluation (rail friction measurements of carry down) gave the same relative ranking for the tested grease samples. Areas for future research in the area are identified.

  • field studies of the effect of friction modifiers on short pitch corrugation generation in curves
    Wear, 2008
    Co-Authors: Donald T. Eadie, Marco Santoro, Kevin Oldknow

    Abstract:

    Abstract This paper describes field evaluation on the effect of top of rail friction control on short pitch corrugation growth on different mass transit railways in Europe and Japan. Measurements were made during baseline conditions to evaluate the rate of growth of corrugations. Friction modifier (FM) was then applied using wayside Application Equipment, in some cases after grinding to re-establish an uncorrugated state. It was observed that FM Application reduced the rate of corrugation growth by a factor of 6–11 times. In most cases there were little or no new corrugations when FM was applied on sites that formed corrugations rapidly under baseline conditions. Modelling showed that the test sites had a range of contact conditions, indicating that the effect of FM on corrugations is insensitive to changes in profile.

  • Field studies of the effect of friction modifiers on short pitch corrugation generation in curves
    Wear, 2008
    Co-Authors: Donald T. Eadie, Marco Santoro, Kevin Oldknow, Yasushi Oka

    Abstract:

    This paper describes field evaluation on the effect of top of rail friction control on short pitch corrugation growth on different mass transit railways in Europe and Japan. Measurements were made during baseline conditions to evaluate the rate of growth of corrugations. Friction modifier (FM) was then applied using wayside Application Equipment, in some cases after grinding to re-establish an uncorrugated state. It was observed that FM Application reduced the rate of corrugation growth by a factor of 6-11 times. In most cases there were little or no new corrugations when FM was applied on sites that formed corrugations rapidly under baseline conditions. Modelling showed that the test sites had a range of contact conditions, indicating that the effect of FM on corrugations is insensitive to changes in profile. © 2008 Donald T. Eadie.

Yasushi Oka – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Field studies of the effect of friction modifiers on short pitch corrugation generation in curves
    Wear, 2008
    Co-Authors: Donald T. Eadie, Marco Santoro, Kevin Oldknow, Yasushi Oka

    Abstract:

    This paper describes field evaluation on the effect of top of rail friction control on short pitch corrugation growth on different mass transit railways in Europe and Japan. Measurements were made during baseline conditions to evaluate the rate of growth of corrugations. Friction modifier (FM) was then applied using wayside Application Equipment, in some cases after grinding to re-establish an uncorrugated state. It was observed that FM Application reduced the rate of corrugation growth by a factor of 6-11 times. In most cases there were little or no new corrugations when FM was applied on sites that formed corrugations rapidly under baseline conditions. Modelling showed that the test sites had a range of contact conditions, indicating that the effect of FM on corrugations is insensitive to changes in profile. © 2008 Donald T. Eadie.