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G. M. Ruiz – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Coarse woody debris as a refuge from predation in Aquatic Communities
    Oecologia, 1993
    Co-Authors: R. A. Everett, G. M. Ruiz

    Abstract:

    This study demonstrates experimentally that coarse woody debris (CWD) can provide refuge from predation in Aquatic habitats. In the Rhode River subestuary of Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, (USA), we (1) measured the abundance of CWD, (2) examined the utilization of CWD by mobile epibenthic fish and crustaceans, and (3) tested experimentally the value of CWD as a refuge from predation. CWD was the dominant above-bottom physical structure in shallow water, ranging in size from small branches (50 cm diameter). In response to experimental additions of CWD, densities of common epibenthic cpecies ( Callinectes sapidus, Fundulus heteroclitus, Fundulus majalis, Gobiosoma bosc, Gobiesox strumosus, Palaemonetes pugio , and Rithropanopeus harrisii ) increased significantly compared to control sites without CWD. In laboratory experiments, grass shrimp ( P. pugio ) responded to predatory fish ( F. heteroclitus and Micropogonias undulatus ) by utilizing shelter at CWD more frequently than in absence of fish. Access to CWD increased survivorship of grass shrimp in laboratory and field experiments. These experimental results (1) support the hypothesis, commonly proposed but untested for freshwater habitats, that CWD can provide a refuge from predation for epibenthic fish and invertebrates and (2) extend the recognized functional importance of CWD in freshwater to estuarine and marine Communities. We hypothesize that CWD is an especially important refuge habitat in the many estuarine and freshwater systems for which alternative physical structure (e.g., vegetation or oyster reefs) are absent or in low abundance.

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  • coarse woody debris as a refuge from predation in Aquatic Communities an experimental test
    Oecologia, 1993
    Co-Authors: R. A. Everett, G. M. Ruiz

    Abstract:

    This study demonstrates experimentally that coarse woody debris (CWD) can provide refuge from predation in Aquatic habitats. In the Rhode River subestuary of Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, (USA), we (1) measured the abundance of CWD, (2) examined the utilization of CWD by mobile epibenthic fish and crustaceans, and (3) tested experimentally the value of CWD as a refuge from predation. CWD was the dominant above-bottom physical structure in shallow water, ranging in size from small branches ( 50 cm diameter). In response to experimental additions of CWD, densities of common epibenthic cpecies (Callinectes sapidus, Fundulus heteroclitus, Fundulus majalis, Gobiosoma bosc, Gobiesox strumosus, Palaemonetes pugio, and Rithropanopeus harrisii) increased significantly compared to control sites without CWD. In laboratory experiments, grass shrimp (P. pugio) responded to predatory fish (F. heteroclitus and Micropogonias undulatus) by utilizing shelter at CWD more frequently than in absence of fish. Access to CWD increased survivorship of grass shrimp in laboratory and field experiments. These experimental results (1) support the hypothesis, commonly proposed but untested for freshwater habitats, that CWD can provide a refuge from predation for epibenthic fish and invertebrates and (2) extend the recognized functional importance of CWD in freshwater to estuarine and marine Communities. We hypothesize that CWD is an especially important refuge habitat in the many estuarine and freshwater systems for which alternative physical structure (e.g., vegetation or oyster reefs) are absent or in low abundance.

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R. A. Everett – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Coarse woody debris as a refuge from predation in Aquatic Communities
    Oecologia, 1993
    Co-Authors: R. A. Everett, G. M. Ruiz

    Abstract:

    This study demonstrates experimentally that coarse woody debris (CWD) can provide refuge from predation in Aquatic habitats. In the Rhode River subestuary of Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, (USA), we (1) measured the abundance of CWD, (2) examined the utilization of CWD by mobile epibenthic fish and crustaceans, and (3) tested experimentally the value of CWD as a refuge from predation. CWD was the dominant above-bottom physical structure in shallow water, ranging in size from small branches (50 cm diameter). In response to experimental additions of CWD, densities of common epibenthic cpecies ( Callinectes sapidus, Fundulus heteroclitus, Fundulus majalis, Gobiosoma bosc, Gobiesox strumosus, Palaemonetes pugio , and Rithropanopeus harrisii ) increased significantly compared to control sites without CWD. In laboratory experiments, grass shrimp ( P. pugio ) responded to predatory fish ( F. heteroclitus and Micropogonias undulatus ) by utilizing shelter at CWD more frequently than in absence of fish. Access to CWD increased survivorship of grass shrimp in laboratory and field experiments. These experimental results (1) support the hypothesis, commonly proposed but untested for freshwater habitats, that CWD can provide a refuge from predation for epibenthic fish and invertebrates and (2) extend the recognized functional importance of CWD in freshwater to estuarine and marine Communities. We hypothesize that CWD is an especially important refuge habitat in the many estuarine and freshwater systems for which alternative physical structure (e.g., vegetation or oyster reefs) are absent or in low abundance.

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  • coarse woody debris as a refuge from predation in Aquatic Communities an experimental test
    Oecologia, 1993
    Co-Authors: R. A. Everett, G. M. Ruiz

    Abstract:

    This study demonstrates experimentally that coarse woody debris (CWD) can provide refuge from predation in Aquatic habitats. In the Rhode River subestuary of Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, (USA), we (1) measured the abundance of CWD, (2) examined the utilization of CWD by mobile epibenthic fish and crustaceans, and (3) tested experimentally the value of CWD as a refuge from predation. CWD was the dominant above-bottom physical structure in shallow water, ranging in size from small branches ( 50 cm diameter). In response to experimental additions of CWD, densities of common epibenthic cpecies (Callinectes sapidus, Fundulus heteroclitus, Fundulus majalis, Gobiosoma bosc, Gobiesox strumosus, Palaemonetes pugio, and Rithropanopeus harrisii) increased significantly compared to control sites without CWD. In laboratory experiments, grass shrimp (P. pugio) responded to predatory fish (F. heteroclitus and Micropogonias undulatus) by utilizing shelter at CWD more frequently than in absence of fish. Access to CWD increased survivorship of grass shrimp in laboratory and field experiments. These experimental results (1) support the hypothesis, commonly proposed but untested for freshwater habitats, that CWD can provide a refuge from predation for epibenthic fish and invertebrates and (2) extend the recognized functional importance of CWD in freshwater to estuarine and marine Communities. We hypothesize that CWD is an especially important refuge habitat in the many estuarine and freshwater systems for which alternative physical structure (e.g., vegetation or oyster reefs) are absent or in low abundance.

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Blake Matthews – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • rapid divergence of predator functional traits affects prey composition in Aquatic Communities
    The American Naturalist, 2019
    Co-Authors: Dominik Werner Schmid, Matthew D Mcgee, Rebecca J Best, Ole Seehausen, Blake Matthews

    Abstract:

    Identifying traits that underlie variation in individual performance of consumers (i.e., trait utility) can help reveal the ecological causes of population divergence and the subsequent consequences for species interactions and community structure. Here, we document a case of rapid divergence (over the past 100 generations, or ∼150 years) in foraging traits and feeding efficiency between a lake and stream population pair of threespine stickleback. Building on predictions from functional trait models of fish feeding, we analyzed foraging experiments with a Bayesian path analysis and elucidated the traits explaining variation in foraging performance and the species composition of ingested prey. Despite extensive previous research on the divergence of foraging traits among populations and ecotypes of stickleback, our results provide novel experimental evidence of trait utility for jaw protrusion, gill raker length, and gill raker spacing when foraging on a natural zooplankton assemblage. Furthermore, we discuss how these traits might contribute to the differential effects of lake and stream stickleback on their prey Communities, observed in both laboratory and mesocosm conditions. More generally, our results illustrate how the rapid divergence of functional foraging traits of consumers can impact the biomass, species composition, and trophic structure of prey Communities.

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