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Arbacia punctulata

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John M Lawrence – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • interactive effects of temperature and nutritional condition on the energy budgets of the sea urchins Arbacia punctulata and lytechinus variegatus echinodermata echinoidea
    Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 2006
    Co-Authors: Sophie K Hill, John M Lawrence

    Abstract:

    Arbacia punctulata and Lytechinus variegatus are widely distributed echinoid species in shallow water in the western Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico that seem to have diierent life history strategies. We evaluated the eiect of two types of stress (high temperature and starvation) on gonad production and scope for growth. We hypothesized that A. punctulata has a stress tolerant life strategy and would be more tolerant to stress and L. variegatus has a competitive ^ ruderal strategy and would be less tolerant to stress. Gonad production by A. punctulata was not as greatly aiected by temperature as L. variegatus, suggesting the hypothesis was correct. Arbacia punctulata had a signi¢cantly higher excretion rate indicating greater energy allocation to maintenance than production. Lytechinus variegatus had a signi¢cantly greater consumption rate but did not absorb signi¢cantly more energy. Arbacia punctulata compensated for its lower food consumption by a higher absorption e⁄ciency. Measured energy expenditure and calculated scope for growth did not diier. However, the percentage change in energy absorbed and energy expenditure was greater for L. variegatus than for A. punctulata with a change in temperature. Feeding had a greater eiect on production than temperature suggesting that the biotic stress of low food availability is more important than an abiotic stress such as temperature on energy budgets.

  • diets and coexistence of the sea urchins lytechinus variegatus and Arbacia punctulata echinodermata along the central florida gulf coast
    Marine Ecology Progress Series, 2005
    Co-Authors: Janessa Cobb, John M Lawrence

    Abstract:

    The basis for coexistence of similar species is fundamental in community ecology. One mechanism for coexistence is differentiation of diets. Lytechinus variegatus and Arbacia punctulata coexist in different microhabitats along the Florida gulf coast. Their great difference in morphology might affect their choice of microhabitats and diet. We analyzed diets of both species at 1 offshore and 1 nearshore site where both occurred in relatively equal numbers, an offshore site dominated by A. punctulata and an offshore site dominated by L. variegatus. Gut contents were analyzed to deter- mine the diet. A. punctulata prim. consumed sessile invertebrates except on dates when algal avail- ability was higher than normal. L. variegatus primarily consumed macroflora except on dates when macroflora was extremely limited. Electivity indices revealed no strong preferences for particular species of algae, although L. variegatus consumed many drift species. A. punctulata and L. variega- tus both fed in a random manner, although they avoided particular species of algae known to contain high concentrations of secondary metabolites. The diet of A. punctulata was correlated with algae only over rubble outcroppings at the offshore site with the highest biomass. Diets of offshore popula- tions were more similar to each other, regardless of the presence of conspecifics, than to those of populations at Caspersen Beach (nearshore site). As diets do not overlap, distribution of individuals at a location would not be affected by interspecific competition for food. However, intraspecific competition may be high due to low site productivity.

  • habitats and characteristics of the sea urchins lytechinus variegatus and Arbacia punctulata echinodermata on the florida gulf coast shelf
    Marine Ecology, 2003
    Co-Authors: Sophie K Hill, John M Lawrence

    Abstract:

    Abstract Lytechinus variegatus and Arbacia punctulata have been studied primarily in inshore, shallow-water areas. However, they are abundant in deeper waters on the Florida gulf-coast shelf and seem important components of the benthic communities there. Lytechinus variegatus occurs alone on sand bottoms and A. punctulata occurs alone on rubble bottoms in these deeper waters. The species also co-occur there on ­heterogeneous bottoms, each in a distinct microhabitat with A. punctulata on rubble and L. variegatus on surrounding sand. Characteristics of the sea urchins in these different deeper-water habitat types and at one nearshore site with a heterogeneous rubble-sand bottom were compared. Over the 2-year study, offshore individuals of both species had low gut and gonad indices and the maximum size of individuals did not change. This suggests food limitation and low production. Offshore, A. punctulata had a higher Aristotle’s lantern index and lower gut and gonad indices in populations where it ­co-occurred with L. variegatus compared to populations where it occurred alone. The ­Aristotle’s lantern index of L. variegatus did not differ among the offshore sites. Neither species seemed food limited at the nearshore site. Although productivity is lower at the offshore sites, both species extend their distribution and reproduction potential by existing there.

Sophie K Hill – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • interactive effects of temperature and nutritional condition on the energy budgets of the sea urchins Arbacia punctulata and lytechinus variegatus echinodermata echinoidea
    Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 2006
    Co-Authors: Sophie K Hill, John M Lawrence

    Abstract:

    Arbacia punctulata and Lytechinus variegatus are widely distributed echinoid species in shallow water in the western Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico that seem to have diierent life history strategies. We evaluated the eiect of two types of stress (high temperature and starvation) on gonad production and scope for growth. We hypothesized that A. punctulata has a stress tolerant life strategy and would be more tolerant to stress and L. variegatus has a competitive ^ ruderal strategy and would be less tolerant to stress. Gonad production by A. punctulata was not as greatly aiected by temperature as L. variegatus, suggesting the hypothesis was correct. Arbacia punctulata had a signi¢cantly higher excretion rate indicating greater energy allocation to maintenance than production. Lytechinus variegatus had a signi¢cantly greater consumption rate but did not absorb signi¢cantly more energy. Arbacia punctulata compensated for its lower food consumption by a higher absorption e⁄ciency. Measured energy expenditure and calculated scope for growth did not diier. However, the percentage change in energy absorbed and energy expenditure was greater for L. variegatus than for A. punctulata with a change in temperature. Feeding had a greater eiect on production than temperature suggesting that the biotic stress of low food availability is more important than an abiotic stress such as temperature on energy budgets.

  • habitats and characteristics of the sea urchins lytechinus variegatus and Arbacia punctulata echinodermata on the florida gulf coast shelf
    Marine Ecology, 2003
    Co-Authors: Sophie K Hill, John M Lawrence

    Abstract:

    Abstract Lytechinus variegatus and Arbacia punctulata have been studied primarily in inshore, shallow-water areas. However, they are abundant in deeper waters on the Florida gulf-coast shelf and seem important components of the benthic communities there. Lytechinus variegatus occurs alone on sand bottoms and A. punctulata occurs alone on rubble bottoms in these deeper waters. The species also co-occur there on ­heterogeneous bottoms, each in a distinct microhabitat with A. punctulata on rubble and L. variegatus on surrounding sand. Characteristics of the sea urchins in these different deeper-water habitat types and at one nearshore site with a heterogeneous rubble-sand bottom were compared. Over the 2-year study, offshore individuals of both species had low gut and gonad indices and the maximum size of individuals did not change. This suggests food limitation and low production. Offshore, A. punctulata had a higher Aristotle’s lantern index and lower gut and gonad indices in populations where it ­co-occurred with L. variegatus compared to populations where it occurred alone. The ­Aristotle’s lantern index of L. variegatus did not differ among the offshore sites. Neither species seemed food limited at the nearshore site. Although productivity is lower at the offshore sites, both species extend their distribution and reproduction potential by existing there.

Janessa Cobb – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • diets and coexistence of the sea urchins lytechinus variegatus and Arbacia punctulata echinodermata along the central florida gulf coast
    Marine Ecology Progress Series, 2005
    Co-Authors: Janessa Cobb, John M Lawrence

    Abstract:

    The basis for coexistence of similar species is fundamental in community ecology. One mechanism for coexistence is differentiation of diets. Lytechinus variegatus and Arbacia punctulata coexist in different microhabitats along the Florida gulf coast. Their great difference in morphology might affect their choice of microhabitats and diet. We analyzed diets of both species at 1 offshore and 1 nearshore site where both occurred in relatively equal numbers, an offshore site dominated by A. punctulata and an offshore site dominated by L. variegatus. Gut contents were analyzed to deter- mine the diet. A. punctulata prim. consumed sessile invertebrates except on dates when algal avail- ability was higher than normal. L. variegatus primarily consumed macroflora except on dates when macroflora was extremely limited. Electivity indices revealed no strong preferences for particular species of algae, although L. variegatus consumed many drift species. A. punctulata and L. variega- tus both fed in a random manner, although they avoided particular species of algae known to contain high concentrations of secondary metabolites. The diet of A. punctulata was correlated with algae only over rubble outcroppings at the offshore site with the highest biomass. Diets of offshore popula- tions were more similar to each other, regardless of the presence of conspecifics, than to those of populations at Caspersen Beach (nearshore site). As diets do not overlap, distribution of individuals at a location would not be affected by interspecific competition for food. However, intraspecific competition may be high due to low site productivity.