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Archaeological Sites

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Hans Tømmervik – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Monitoring Archaeological Sites in a changing landscape–using multitemporal satellite remote sensing as an ‘early warning’ method for detecting regrowth processes
    Archaeological Prospection, 2020
    Co-Authors: Stine Barlindhaug, Inger Marie Holm-olsen, Hans Tømmervik

    Abstract:

    In the coastal areas of North Norway farm abandonment followed by regrowth and reforestation is a major factor leading to landscape change. One consequence of this change is that Archaeological Sites are lost. A survey programme started by the Norwegian Directorate for Cultural Heritage in 1997, aimed at monitoring the condition of Archaeological Sites listed in the Norwegian National Sites and Monuments Record, has documented that regrowth processes represent a threat to the Sites. The extent of the problem of regrowth and reforestation of Archaeological Sites is mostly unknown, however, and efficient coping strategies are not developed. In this article we present a change detec- tionmethodbased onthe use ofthe Normalized DifferenceVegetation Index (NDVI) applied to Landsat images with different acquisition dates, followed by image differencing. This procedure results in an easilyinterpretable andextremelyquick approach to change detection ofland coveraswellas change in biomass, and it can be used as a’first warning’method to indicate Archaeological Sites threatened by regrowth processes. The method as it is applied in this study appears to be most suitable for monitoring changesin the infield areaswhere contrasts are clearest.Furtherdevelopment ispossible, both at the regional level using medium resolution satellite remote sensing where the aim is to detect significant changes in the agricultural as well as the cultural landscape, and at the site level, where use ofthe same method on data from high-resolution sensorswillallowmonitoring ofthe site on avery detailed scale. Copyright # 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • monitoring Archaeological Sites in a changing landscape using multitemporal satellite remote sensing as an early warning method for detecting regrowth processes
    Archaeological Prospection, 2007
    Co-Authors: Stine Barlindhaug, Inger Marie Holmolsen, Hans Tømmervik

    Abstract:

    In the coastal areas of North Norway farm abandonment followed by regrowth and reforestation is a major factor leading to landscape change. One consequence of this change is that Archaeological Sites are lost. A survey programme started by the Norwegian Directorate for Cultural Heritage in 1997, aimed at monitoring the condition of Archaeological Sites listed in the Norwegian National Sites and Monuments Record, has documented that regrowth processes represent a threat to the Sites. The extent of the problem of regrowth and reforestation of Archaeological Sites is mostly unknown, however, and efficient coping strategies are not developed. In this article we present a change detec- tionmethodbased onthe use ofthe Normalized DifferenceVegetation Index (NDVI) applied to Landsat images with different acquisition dates, followed by image differencing. This procedure results in an easilyinterpretable andextremelyquick approach to change detection ofland coveraswellas change in biomass, and it can be used as a’first warning’method to indicate Archaeological Sites threatened by regrowth processes. The method as it is applied in this study appears to be most suitable for monitoring changesin the infield areaswhere contrasts are clearest.Furtherdevelopment ispossible, both at the regional level using medium resolution satellite remote sensing where the aim is to detect significant changes in the agricultural as well as the cultural landscape, and at the site level, where use ofthe same method on data from high-resolution sensorswillallowmonitoring ofthe site on avery detailed scale. Copyright # 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Stine Barlindhaug – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Monitoring Archaeological Sites in a changing landscape–using multitemporal satellite remote sensing as an ‘early warning’ method for detecting regrowth processes
    Archaeological Prospection, 2020
    Co-Authors: Stine Barlindhaug, Inger Marie Holm-olsen, Hans Tømmervik

    Abstract:

    In the coastal areas of North Norway farm abandonment followed by regrowth and reforestation is a major factor leading to landscape change. One consequence of this change is that Archaeological Sites are lost. A survey programme started by the Norwegian Directorate for Cultural Heritage in 1997, aimed at monitoring the condition of Archaeological Sites listed in the Norwegian National Sites and Monuments Record, has documented that regrowth processes represent a threat to the Sites. The extent of the problem of regrowth and reforestation of Archaeological Sites is mostly unknown, however, and efficient coping strategies are not developed. In this article we present a change detec- tionmethodbased onthe use ofthe Normalized DifferenceVegetation Index (NDVI) applied to Landsat images with different acquisition dates, followed by image differencing. This procedure results in an easilyinterpretable andextremelyquick approach to change detection ofland coveraswellas change in biomass, and it can be used as a’first warning’method to indicate Archaeological Sites threatened by regrowth processes. The method as it is applied in this study appears to be most suitable for monitoring changesin the infield areaswhere contrasts are clearest.Furtherdevelopment ispossible, both at the regional level using medium resolution satellite remote sensing where the aim is to detect significant changes in the agricultural as well as the cultural landscape, and at the site level, where use ofthe same method on data from high-resolution sensorswillallowmonitoring ofthe site on avery detailed scale. Copyright # 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • monitoring Archaeological Sites in a changing landscape using multitemporal satellite remote sensing as an early warning method for detecting regrowth processes
    Archaeological Prospection, 2007
    Co-Authors: Stine Barlindhaug, Inger Marie Holmolsen, Hans Tømmervik

    Abstract:

    In the coastal areas of North Norway farm abandonment followed by regrowth and reforestation is a major factor leading to landscape change. One consequence of this change is that Archaeological Sites are lost. A survey programme started by the Norwegian Directorate for Cultural Heritage in 1997, aimed at monitoring the condition of Archaeological Sites listed in the Norwegian National Sites and Monuments Record, has documented that regrowth processes represent a threat to the Sites. The extent of the problem of regrowth and reforestation of Archaeological Sites is mostly unknown, however, and efficient coping strategies are not developed. In this article we present a change detec- tionmethodbased onthe use ofthe Normalized DifferenceVegetation Index (NDVI) applied to Landsat images with different acquisition dates, followed by image differencing. This procedure results in an easilyinterpretable andextremelyquick approach to change detection ofland coveraswellas change in biomass, and it can be used as a’first warning’method to indicate Archaeological Sites threatened by regrowth processes. The method as it is applied in this study appears to be most suitable for monitoring changesin the infield areaswhere contrasts are clearest.Furtherdevelopment ispossible, both at the regional level using medium resolution satellite remote sensing where the aim is to detect significant changes in the agricultural as well as the cultural landscape, and at the site level, where use ofthe same method on data from high-resolution sensorswillallowmonitoring ofthe site on avery detailed scale. Copyright # 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Inger Marie Holmolsen – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • monitoring Archaeological Sites in a changing landscape using multitemporal satellite remote sensing as an early warning method for detecting regrowth processes
    Archaeological Prospection, 2007
    Co-Authors: Stine Barlindhaug, Inger Marie Holmolsen, Hans Tømmervik

    Abstract:

    In the coastal areas of North Norway farm abandonment followed by regrowth and reforestation is a major factor leading to landscape change. One consequence of this change is that Archaeological Sites are lost. A survey programme started by the Norwegian Directorate for Cultural Heritage in 1997, aimed at monitoring the condition of Archaeological Sites listed in the Norwegian National Sites and Monuments Record, has documented that regrowth processes represent a threat to the Sites. The extent of the problem of regrowth and reforestation of Archaeological Sites is mostly unknown, however, and efficient coping strategies are not developed. In this article we present a change detec- tionmethodbased onthe use ofthe Normalized DifferenceVegetation Index (NDVI) applied to Landsat images with different acquisition dates, followed by image differencing. This procedure results in an easilyinterpretable andextremelyquick approach to change detection ofland coveraswellas change in biomass, and it can be used as a’first warning’method to indicate Archaeological Sites threatened by regrowth processes. The method as it is applied in this study appears to be most suitable for monitoring changesin the infield areaswhere contrasts are clearest.Furtherdevelopment ispossible, both at the regional level using medium resolution satellite remote sensing where the aim is to detect significant changes in the agricultural as well as the cultural landscape, and at the site level, where use ofthe same method on data from high-resolution sensorswillallowmonitoring ofthe site on avery detailed scale. Copyright # 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.