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Image Credits David R Gray – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Soapstone Arctic Hare
    , 2009
    Co-Authors: Image Credits David R Gray

    Abstract:

    Artist Simeoni Hakuluk carves his first soapstone Arctic Hare (Lepus Arcticus), using a white stone from Coral Harbour. Rankin Inlet, Nunavut, in 2004.

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  • Toy Arctic Hare
    , 2009
    Co-Authors: Image Credits David R Gray

    Abstract:

    This toy Arctic Hare (Lepus Arcticus) was made of sealskin in the late 1960s, probably for the tourist trade in Iqaluit (now in Nunavut).

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  • Thule Arctic Hare Drive
    , 2009
    Co-Authors: Image Credits David R Gray

    Abstract:

    A winter view of an ancient Thule Arctic Hare (Lepus Arcticus) drive of stone on Snare Hill, at Sverdrup Pass, on Ellesmere Island in Nunavut.

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Ole Bennike – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Holocene environmental reconstruction from deltaic deposits in northeast Greenland
    Journal of Quaternary Science, 2002
    Co-Authors: Hanne H. Christiansen, Ole Bennike, Jens Böcher, Bo Elberling, Ole Humlum, Bjarne Holm Jakobsen

    Abstract:

    Terraces of different age in the Zackenberg delta, located at 74°N in northeast Greenland, have provided the opportunity for an interdisciplinary approach to the investigation of Holocene glacial, periglacial, pedological, biological and archaeological conditions that existed during and after delta deposition.

    The raised Zackenberg delta accumulated mainly during the Holocene Climatic Optimum, starting slightly prior to 9500 cal. yr BP (30 m a.s.l.) and continued until at least 6300 cal. yr BP (0.5 m a.s.l.). Evidence of sea-level change is based on conventional 14C dates of shells from the marine delta bottomsets, 14C AMS dating of macroscopic plant material from the foresets and of fluvial deposits. Arthropod and plant remains from 7960 cal. yr BP in the delta foresets include the oldest evidence of the Arctic Hare in Greenland and evidence of a rich herb flora slightly different from the modern flora. Empetrum nigrum and Salix herbacea remains indicate a summer temperature at least as high as today during delta deposition. Post-depositional nivation activity, dated by luminescence, lichenometry and Schmidt Hammer measurements indicate mainly late Holocene activity, at least since 2900 yr BP, including Little Ice Age (LIA) avalanche activity. Pedological analyses of fossil podsols in the Zackenberg delta, including 14C AMS dating of selected organic rich B-horizons, show continued podsol development during the Holocene Climatic Optimum and into the subsequent colder period of the late Holocene, until 3000–2400 yr BP. A Neo-Eskimo house ruin found on the lower part of the delta, presently being eroded by the sea, is dated to AD 1800. It presumably was abandoned prior to AD 1869, and suggests that some of the last Eskimos that lived in northeast Greenland might have occupied the Zackenberg delta. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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  • Quaternary vertebrates from Greenland: A review
    Quaternary Science Reviews, 1997
    Co-Authors: Ole Bennike

    Abstract:

    Abstract Remains of fishes, birds and mammals are rarely reported from Quaternary deposits in Greenland. The oldest remains come from Late Pliocene and Early Pleistocene deposits and comprise Atlantic cod, Hare, rabbit and ringed seal. Interglacial and interstadial deposits have yielded remains of cod, little auk, collared lemming, ringed seal, reindeer and bowhead whale. Early and Mid-Holocene finds include capelin, polar cod, red fish, sculpin, three-spined stickleback, Lapland longspur, Arctic Hare, collared lemming, wolf, walrus, ringed seal, reindeer and bowhead whale. It is considered unlikely that vertebrates could survive in Greenland during the peak of the last glaciation, but many species had probably already immigrated in the Early Holocene.

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Anders Michelsen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • limited dietary overlap amongst resident Arctic herbivores in winter complementary insights from complementary methods
    Oecologia, 2018
    Co-Authors: Niels Martin Schmidt, Jesper Bruun Mosbacher, Eero J. Vesterinen, Tomas Roslin, Anders Michelsen

    Abstract:

    Snow may prevent Arctic herbivores from accessing their forage in winter, forcing them to aggregate in the few patches with limited snow. In High Arctic Greenland, Arctic Hare and rock ptarmigan often forage in muskox feeding craters. We therefore hypothesized that due to limited availability of forage, the dietary niches of these resident herbivores overlap considerably, and that the overlap increases as winter progresses. To test this, we analyzed fecal samples collected in early and late winter. We used molecular analysis to identify the plant taxa consumed, and stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen to quantify the dietary niche breadth and dietary overlap. The plant taxa found indicated only limited dietary differentiation between the herbivores. As expected, dietary niches exhibited a strong contraction from early to late winter, especially for rock ptarmigan. This may indicate increasing reliance on particular plant resources as winter progresses. In early winter, the diet of rock ptarmigan overlapped slightly with that of muskox and Arctic Hare. Contrary to our expectations, no inter-specific dietary niche overlap was observed in late winter. This overall pattern was specifically revealed by combined analysis of molecular data and stable isotope contents. Hence, despite foraging in the same areas and generally feeding on the same plant taxa, the quantitative dietary overlap between the three herbivores was limited. This may be attributable to species-specific consumption rates of plant taxa. Yet, Arctic Hare and rock ptarmigan may benefit from muskox opening up the snow pack, thereby allowing them to access the plants.

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