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Arm Swelling

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Sharon L. Hammond – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Subclavian vein obstruction without thrombosis.
    Journal of Vascular Surgery, 2005
    Co-Authors: Richard J. Sanders, Sharon L. Hammond

    Abstract:

    Background Unilateral Arm Swelling caused by subclavian vein obstruction without thrombosis is an uncommon form of venous thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). In 87 patients with venous TOS, only 21 patients had no thrombosis. We describe the diagnosis and treatment of these patients. Material and methods Twenty-one patients with Arm Swelling, cyanosis, and venograms demonstrating partial subclavian vein obstruction were treated with transaxillary first rib resection and venolysis. Results Eighteen (86%) of 21 patients had good-to-excellent improvement of symptoms. There were two failures (9%). Conclusions Unilateral Arm Swelling without thrombosis, when not caused by lymphatic obstruction, may be due to subclavian vein compression at the costoclavicular ligament because of compression either by that ligament or the subclavius tendon most often because of congenital close proximity of the vein to the ligament. Arm symptoms of neurogenic TOS, pain, and paresthesia often accompany venous TOS while neck pain and headache, other common symptoms of neurogenic TOS, are infrequent. Diagnosis was made by dynamic venography. First rib resection, which included the anterior portion of rib and cartilage plus division of the costoclavicular ligament and subclavius tendon, proved to be effective treatment.

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  • Venous thoracic outlet syndrome.
    Hand Clinics, 2004
    Co-Authors: Richard J. Sanders, Sharon L. Hammond

    Abstract:

    Venous thoracic outlet syndrome is caused by subclavian vein obstruction with or without thrombosis. The primary symptom is Arm Swelling, frequently accompanied by cyanosis, pain, and occasionally paresthesias. Venography is the only reliable diagnostic tool. Therapy has three goals: (1) remove the thrombus (in thrombotic cases), (2) remove the extrinsic compression, and in a minority of cases, (3) remove the intrinsic stenosis.

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Peter Mortimer – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The psychological morbidity of breast cancer–related Arm Swelling. Psychological morbidity of lymphoedema
    Cancer, 1993
    Co-Authors: Marie B. Tobin, Hubert J. Lacey, Lesley Meyer, Peter Mortimer

    Abstract:

    Background. The psychological morbidity, functional impairment, and disturbance in psychosocial adjustment to illness was evaluated in relation to breast cancer-related Arm Swelling.

    Methods. Fifty women with breast cancer-related Arm Swelling were matched with 50 control subjects for age, duration since treatment, and type of treatment received. All study participants were free from active disease and had been treated more than 1 year ago.

    Results. Patients with Arm Swelling showed greater psychological morbidity at formal psychiatric interview, impaired adjustment to illness as evaluated by the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale, and greater impairment of physical functioning.

    Conclusions. Patients with Arm Swelling in relation to breast cancer experienced functional impairment, psychosocial maladjustment, and increased psychological morbidity. These findings have implications for management of breast cancer.

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  • the psychological morbidity of breast cancer related Arm Swelling psychological morbidity of lymphoedema
    Cancer, 1993
    Co-Authors: Marie Tobin, Peter Mortimer, Hubert J. Lacey, Lesley Meyer

    Abstract:

    Background. The psychological morbidity, functional impairment, and disturbance in psychosocial adjustment to illness was evaluated in relation to breast cancer-related Arm Swelling.

    Methods. Fifty women with breast cancer-related Arm Swelling were matched with 50 control subjects for age, duration since treatment, and type of treatment received. All study participants were free from active disease and had been treated more than 1 year ago.

    Results. Patients with Arm Swelling showed greater psychological morbidity at formal psychiatric interview, impaired adjustment to illness as evaluated by the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale, and greater impairment of physical functioning.

    Conclusions. Patients with Arm Swelling in relation to breast cancer experienced functional impairment, psychosocial maladjustment, and increased psychological morbidity. These findings have implications for management of breast cancer.

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Richard J. Sanders – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Subclavian vein obstruction without thrombosis.
    Journal of Vascular Surgery, 2005
    Co-Authors: Richard J. Sanders, Sharon L. Hammond

    Abstract:

    Background Unilateral Arm Swelling caused by subclavian vein obstruction without thrombosis is an uncommon form of venous thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). In 87 patients with venous TOS, only 21 patients had no thrombosis. We describe the diagnosis and treatment of these patients. Material and methods Twenty-one patients with Arm Swelling, cyanosis, and venograms demonstrating partial subclavian vein obstruction were treated with transaxillary first rib resection and venolysis. Results Eighteen (86%) of 21 patients had good-to-excellent improvement of symptoms. There were two failures (9%). Conclusions Unilateral Arm Swelling without thrombosis, when not caused by lymphatic obstruction, may be due to subclavian vein compression at the costoclavicular ligament because of compression either by that ligament or the subclavius tendon most often because of congenital close proximity of the vein to the ligament. Arm symptoms of neurogenic TOS, pain, and paresthesia often accompany venous TOS while neck pain and headache, other common symptoms of neurogenic TOS, are infrequent. Diagnosis was made by dynamic venography. First rib resection, which included the anterior portion of rib and cartilage plus division of the costoclavicular ligament and subclavius tendon, proved to be effective treatment.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • Venous thoracic outlet syndrome.
    Hand Clinics, 2004
    Co-Authors: Richard J. Sanders, Sharon L. Hammond

    Abstract:

    Venous thoracic outlet syndrome is caused by subclavian vein obstruction with or without thrombosis. The primary symptom is Arm Swelling, frequently accompanied by cyanosis, pain, and occasionally paresthesias. Venography is the only reliable diagnostic tool. Therapy has three goals: (1) remove the thrombus (in thrombotic cases), (2) remove the extrinsic compression, and in a minority of cases, (3) remove the intrinsic stenosis.

    Free Register to Access Article