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Arriving Packet

The Experts below are selected from a list of 228 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Tutomu Murase – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Adaptive Pushout: A Buffer Management Scheme to Improve TCP Fairness in Wireless LANs
    2012 IEEE 75th Vehicular Technology Conference (VTC Spring), 2012
    Co-Authors: Kazushige Hayashi, Shigeo Shioda, Nobuyoshi Komuro, Shiro Sakata, Tutomu Murase

    Abstract:

    We propose to use a buffer management scheme, called adaptive pushout, in the transmission buffer of the access point (AP) in order to solve unfairness problems between competing TCP flows over wireless LANs. The adaptive pushout comes from the observation that multiple ACK segments in a TCP connection are redundant because of the cumulative acknowledgment mechanism of the TCP. Under the adaptive pushout, an Arriving Packet encountering the full buffer removes one of redundant ACKs from the transmission buffer of the AP to enter there. When the buffer is full and has no redundant ACK, the Arriving Packet adaptively chooses one of Packets in the buffer for pushing it out from the buffer. The choice of the Packet to be pushed out depends on the number of uplink and downlink TCP flows, which are continuously monitored in the proposal. We have conducted simulation experiments to show that the adaptive pushout greatly improves the fairness compared with existing proposals.

  • VTC Spring – Adaptive Pushout: A Buffer Management Scheme to Improve TCP Fairness in Wireless LANs
    2012 IEEE 75th Vehicular Technology Conference (VTC Spring), 2012
    Co-Authors: Kazushige Hayashi, Shigeo Shioda, Nobuyoshi Komuro, Shiro Sakata, Tutomu Murase

    Abstract:

    We propose to use a buffer management scheme, called adaptive pushout, in the transmission buffer of the access point (AP) in order to solve unfairness problems between competing TCP flows over wireless LANs. The adaptive pushout comes from the observation that multiple ACK segments in a TCP connection are redundant because of the cumulative acknowledgment mechanism of the TCP. Under the adaptive pushout, an Arriving Packet encountering the full buffer removes one of redundant ACKs from the transmission buffer of the AP to enter there. When the buffer is full and has no redundant ACK, the Arriving Packet adaptively chooses one of Packets in the buffer for pushing it out from the buffer. The choice of the Packet to be pushed out depends on the number of uplink and downlink TCP flows, which are continuously monitored in the proposal. We have conducted simulation experiments to show that the adaptive pushout greatly improves the fairness compared with existing proposals.

C.c. Bisdikian – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • INFOCOM – Waiting time analysis in a single buffer DQDB (802.6) network
    IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications, 1990
    Co-Authors: C.c. Bisdikian

    Abstract:

    The statistics of the request and countdown counters of a user in a network that operates with the DQDB (distributed queue dual bus) media access protocol are investigated. Assuming that a user can have at most one Packet waiting for transmission, an expression is obtained for the steady-state generating function of the number of requests queued ahead of an Arriving Packet. Given this number, the waiting time of the Packet can be easily obtained. The results provide an insight on how traffic, generated from the left and the right of a user in the network, affects the waiting time characteristics of Packets generated by the user. >

  • Waiting time analysis in a single buffer DQDB (802.6) network
    IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications, 1990
    Co-Authors: C.c. Bisdikian

    Abstract:

    The statistics of the request and countdown counters of a user in a network that operates with the DQDB (distributed queue dual bus) media access protocol are investigated. Assuming that a user can have at most one Packet waiting for transmission, an expression is obtained for the steady-state generating function of the number of requests queued ahead of an Arriving Packet. Given this number, the waiting time of the Packet can be easily obtained. The results provide an insight on how traffic, generated from the left and the right of a user in the network, affects the waiting time characteristics of Packets generated by the user.

Yuguang Fang – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Differentiated Bandwidth Allocation with TCP Protection in Core Routers
    IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems, 2009
    Co-Authors: Yuguang Fang

    Abstract:

    Differentiated Services (DiffServ) networks categorize routers into edge routers and core routers. In core routers, one of the technological challenges is how to implement differentiated bandwidth allocation and TCP protection together with low complexity. We present an Active Queue Management (AQM) scheme called CHOKeW. A method is borrowed from a previous scheme, CHOKe, which draws a Packet at random from the buffer, compares it with the Arriving Packet, and drops both if they are from the same flow. CHOKeW enhances the drawing function by adjusting the maximum number of draws based on the priority of the new arrival and the current status of network congestion. With respect to the number of flows, both the memory-requirement complexity and the per-Packet-processing complexity for CHOKeW is O(1). An analytical model and multiple simulations are used to explain and evaluate CHOKeW. We show that CHOKeW is able to (1) support differentiated bandwidth allocation; (2) provide the flows in the same priority with better fairness than other conventional stateless AQM schemes such as RED and BLUE; (3) maintain high link utilization as well as short queue length; and (4) protect TCP flows by restricting the bandwidth share of high-speed unresponsive flows.

  • CHOKeW: Bandwidth differentiation and TCP protection in core networks
    Proceedings – IEEE Military Communications Conference MILCOM, 2005
    Co-Authors: Shushan Wen, Yuguang Fang, Hairong Sun

    Abstract:

    Both bandwidth differentiation and TCP protection is important for implementing Quality of Services (QoS) in TCP/IP networks. To the best of our knowledge, no other schemes have combined these two tasks together so far. In this paper we present a stateless Active Queue Management (AQM) algorithm called CHOKeW. CHOKeW uses “matched drops” created by CHOKe to control the bandwidth allocation, but excludes the RED module. Based on the congestion status and the priority of the Arriving Packet, CHOKeW adjusts the maximum number of Packets drawn from the buffer for matched drops. Using simulations, we show that CHOKeW is capable of working in different congestion scenarios, supporting multiple bandwidth priority levels by giving high priority flows with high throughput, and restrict the throughput of high-speed unresponsive flows to protect TCP flows.