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Georg Schmidt – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Sex differences in long-term mortality among acute myocardial infarction patients: Results from the ISAR-RISK and Art Studies.
    PLOS ONE, 2017
    Co-Authors: Romy Ubrich, Petra Barthel, Bernhard Haller, Katerina Hnatkova, Katharina M. Huster, Alexander Steger, Alexander Müller, Marek Malik, Georg Schmidt

    Abstract:

    Background
    Mortality rates in females who survived acute myocardial infarction (AMI) exceed those in males. Differences between sexes in age, cardiovascular risk factors and revascularization therapy have been proposed as possible reasons.

    Objective
    To select sets of female and male patients comparable in respect of relevant risk factors in order to compare the sex-specific risk in a systematic manner.

    Methods
    Data of the ISAR-RISK and Art Studies were investigated. Patients were enrolled between 1996 and 2005 and suffered from AMI within 4 weeks prior to enrolment. Patients of each sex were selected with 1:1 equivalent age, previous AMI history, sinus-rhythm presence, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking status, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and revascularization therapy. Survival times were compared between sex groups in the whole study cohort and in the matched cohort.

    Results
    Of 3840 consecutive AMI survivors, 994 (25.9%) were females and 2846 (74.1%) were males. Females were older and suffered more frequently from hypertension and diabetes mellitus. In the whole cohort, females showed an increased mortality with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.54 compared to males (p

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  • sex differences in long term mortality among acute myocardial infarction patients results from the isar risk and Art Studies
    PLOS ONE, 2017
    Co-Authors: Romy Ubrich, Petra Barthel, Bernhard Haller, Katerina Hnatkova, Katharina M. Huster, Alexander Steger, Alexander Müller, Marek Malik, Georg Schmidt

    Abstract:

    Background
    Mortality rates in females who survived acute myocardial infarction (AMI) exceed those in males. Differences between sexes in age, cardiovascular risk factors and revascularization therapy have been proposed as possible reasons.

    Objective
    To select sets of female and male patients comparable in respect of relevant risk factors in order to compare the sex-specific risk in a systematic manner.

    Methods
    Data of the ISAR-RISK and Art Studies were investigated. Patients were enrolled between 1996 and 2005 and suffered from AMI within 4 weeks prior to enrolment. Patients of each sex were selected with 1:1 equivalent age, previous AMI history, sinus-rhythm presence, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking status, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and revascularization therapy. Survival times were compared between sex groups in the whole study cohort and in the matched cohort.

    Results
    Of 3840 consecutive AMI survivors, 994 (25.9%) were females and 2846 (74.1%) were males. Females were older and suffered more frequently from hypertension and diabetes mellitus. In the whole cohort, females showed an increased mortality with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.54 compared to males (p<0.0001). The matched cohort comprised 802 patients of each sex and revealed a trend towards poorer survival in females (HR for female sex 1.14; p = 0.359). However, significant mortality differences with a higher risk in matched females was observed during the first year after AMI (HR = 1.61; p = 0.045) but not during the subsequent years. Conclusion Matched sub-groups of post-AMI patients showed a comparable long-term mortality. However, a female excess mortality remained during first year after AMI and cannot be explained by differences in age, cardiovascular risk factors, and modes of acute treatment. Other causal factors, including clinical as well as psychological and social aspects, need to be considered. Female post-AMI patients should be followed more actively pArticularly during the first year after AMI.

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Manuel R. González Morales – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Paleolithic Art: A Cultural History
    Journal of Archaeological Research, 2013
    Co-Authors: Oscar Moro Abadía, Manuel R. González Morales

    Abstract:

    In this Article we review the history of the terms and ideas that have been used to conceptualize Paleolithic Art since the end of the 19th century. Between 1900 and 1970, prehistoric representations were typically divided into two main groups: parietal Art (including rock and cave Art) and portable (or mobiliary) Art. This classification gave rise to asymmetrical attitudes about Paleolithic images. In pArticular, many portable and nonfigurative representations were overlooked while a small number of cave paintings were praised for their realism. Although the portable/parietal division has remained a popular divide among archaeologists, in the last 30 years increasing numbers of specialists have crossed the boundaries established by these categories. They have developed new frameworks within which more kinds of images are meaningfully approached and incorporated into the analysis of Paleolithic Art and symbolism. The emergence of new approaches to Pleistocene imagery is the result of a number of interrelated processes, including the globalization of Paleolithic Art Studies, the impact of new discoveries, and the development of new approaches to Art, images, and symbolism.

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  • PALEOLITHIC Art Studies AT THE BEGINNING OF THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY : A Loss of Innocence
    Journal of Anthropological Research, 2008
    Co-Authors: Oscar Moro Abadía, Manuel R. González Morales

    Abstract:

    In the past two decades, several scholars have suggested that Paleolithic Art Studies have been undergoing a revolution. This disciplinary transformation is generally related to the discovery of new sites, such as Chauvet or Blombos Cave; the development of new methodologies, such as AMS radiocarbon and thermoluminescence dating; and the rise of new theories concerning human cognitive evolution. These firsts are not only revolutionizing the chronology and technical study of the oldest forms of Art, they are also modifying the ways Paleolithic Art is conceptualized. In this Article we analyze some of these recent variations in how we view, think about, and define such Art. Borrowing David Clarke’s terminology, we interpret the current change in our understanding of Paleolithic Art as a “loss of innocence” stemming from an increasing criticism of the main axioms that defined the study of Paleolithic Art until the 1980s. In this context, the loss of disciplinary innocence can be defined as the process by whi…

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Romy Ubrich – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Sex differences in long-term mortality among acute myocardial infarction patients: Results from the ISAR-RISK and Art Studies.
    PLOS ONE, 2017
    Co-Authors: Romy Ubrich, Petra Barthel, Bernhard Haller, Katerina Hnatkova, Katharina M. Huster, Alexander Steger, Alexander Müller, Marek Malik, Georg Schmidt

    Abstract:

    Background
    Mortality rates in females who survived acute myocardial infarction (AMI) exceed those in males. Differences between sexes in age, cardiovascular risk factors and revascularization therapy have been proposed as possible reasons.

    Objective
    To select sets of female and male patients comparable in respect of relevant risk factors in order to compare the sex-specific risk in a systematic manner.

    Methods
    Data of the ISAR-RISK and Art Studies were investigated. Patients were enrolled between 1996 and 2005 and suffered from AMI within 4 weeks prior to enrolment. Patients of each sex were selected with 1:1 equivalent age, previous AMI history, sinus-rhythm presence, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking status, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and revascularization therapy. Survival times were compared between sex groups in the whole study cohort and in the matched cohort.

    Results
    Of 3840 consecutive AMI survivors, 994 (25.9%) were females and 2846 (74.1%) were males. Females were older and suffered more frequently from hypertension and diabetes mellitus. In the whole cohort, females showed an increased mortality with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.54 compared to males (p

    Free Register to Access Article

  • sex differences in long term mortality among acute myocardial infarction patients results from the isar risk and Art Studies
    PLOS ONE, 2017
    Co-Authors: Romy Ubrich, Petra Barthel, Bernhard Haller, Katerina Hnatkova, Katharina M. Huster, Alexander Steger, Alexander Müller, Marek Malik, Georg Schmidt

    Abstract:

    Background
    Mortality rates in females who survived acute myocardial infarction (AMI) exceed those in males. Differences between sexes in age, cardiovascular risk factors and revascularization therapy have been proposed as possible reasons.

    Objective
    To select sets of female and male patients comparable in respect of relevant risk factors in order to compare the sex-specific risk in a systematic manner.

    Methods
    Data of the ISAR-RISK and Art Studies were investigated. Patients were enrolled between 1996 and 2005 and suffered from AMI within 4 weeks prior to enrolment. Patients of each sex were selected with 1:1 equivalent age, previous AMI history, sinus-rhythm presence, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking status, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and revascularization therapy. Survival times were compared between sex groups in the whole study cohort and in the matched cohort.

    Results
    Of 3840 consecutive AMI survivors, 994 (25.9%) were females and 2846 (74.1%) were males. Females were older and suffered more frequently from hypertension and diabetes mellitus. In the whole cohort, females showed an increased mortality with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.54 compared to males (p<0.0001). The matched cohort comprised 802 patients of each sex and revealed a trend towards poorer survival in females (HR for female sex 1.14; p = 0.359). However, significant mortality differences with a higher risk in matched females was observed during the first year after AMI (HR = 1.61; p = 0.045) but not during the subsequent years. Conclusion Matched sub-groups of post-AMI patients showed a comparable long-term mortality. However, a female excess mortality remained during first year after AMI and cannot be explained by differences in age, cardiovascular risk factors, and modes of acute treatment. Other causal factors, including clinical as well as psychological and social aspects, need to be considered. Female post-AMI patients should be followed more actively pArticularly during the first year after AMI.

    Free Register to Access Article