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Arterial Oxygen Saturation

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Erika Schagatay – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Effects of depth and dive type on recovery of Arterial Oxygen Saturation after deep competition apnea dives : Meeting Abstract
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Erika Schagatay, Johan Andersson, Angelica Lodin-sundström, Fanny Z. Schagatay, Mats H Liner

    Abstract:

    Effects of depth and dive type on recovery of Arterial Oxygen Saturation after deep competition apnea dives : Meeting Abstract

  • diving response and Arterial Oxygen Saturation during apnea and exercise in breath hold divers
    Journal of Applied Physiology, 2002
    Co-Authors: Johan Andersson, Erika Schagatay, Mats H Liner, Elisabeth Runow

    Abstract:

    Diving response and Arterial Oxygen Saturation during apnea and exercise in breath-hold divers.

  • diving response and Arterial Oxygen Saturation during apnea and exercise in breath hold divers
    Journal of Applied Physiology, 2002
    Co-Authors: Johan Andersson, Erika Schagatay, Mats H Liner, Elisabeth Runow

    Abstract:

    This study addressed the effects of apnea in air and apnea with face immersion in cold water (10°C) on the diving response and Arterial Oxygen Saturation during dynamic exercise. Eight trained brea…

David P. Southall – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Arterial Oxygen Saturation in healthy term neonates
    European Journal of Pediatrics, 1996
    Co-Authors: Christian F. Poets, V. A. Stebbens, Lang Ja, O'brien Lm, Boon Aw, David P. Southall

    Abstract:

    Our objective was to determine Arterial Oxygen Saturation as measured by pulse oximetry (SpO2) in healthy term neonates during their first 4 weeks of life. Overnight recordings of SpO2 (Nellcor N200), photoplethysmographic (pulse) wave-forms from the oximeter and breathing movements were performed in 60 term infants. They were studied initially during their 1st week of life (median age 4 days, range 1–7) and then again during their 2nd–4th week (median age 17 days, range 8–27). Median baseline SpO2, measured during regular breathing, was 97.6% (range 92–100) during week 1 versus 98.0% (86.6–100) during week 2–4 (P>0.05). Episodes of deSaturation, defined as a fall in SpO2 to ≤80% for ≥4 s, were found in 35% of recordings obtained in week 1 compared to 60% of those obtained in week 2–4 (P

  • Arterial Oxygen Saturation in healthy term neonates
    European Journal of Pediatrics, 1996
    Co-Authors: Christian F. Poets, V. A. Stebbens, J A Lang, L Obrien, A W Boon, David P. Southall

    Abstract:

    Our objective was to determine Arterial Oxygen Saturation as measured by pulse oximetry (SpO2) in healthy term neonates during their first 4 weeks of life. Overnight recordings of SpO2 (Nellcor N200), photoplethysmographic (pulse) wave-forms from the oximeter and breathing movements were performed in 60 term infants. They were studied initially during their 1st week of life (median age 4 days, range 1–7) and then again during their 2nd–4th week (median age 17 days, range 8–27). Median baseline SpO2, measured during regular breathing, was 97.6% (range 92–100) during week 1 versus 98.0% (86.6–100) during week 2–4 (P>0.05). Episodes of deSaturation, defined as a fall in SpO2 to ≤80% for ≥4 s, were found in 35% of recordings obtained in week 1 compared to 60% of those obtained in week 2–4 (P<0.01). Their frequency increased from a median of 0 (0–41) per 12 h of recording at the initial recording to 1 (0–165) at follow up (P<0.01). Analysis of the data by week of life showed a peak in deSaturation frequency in the 2nd week of life. The infants with extreme values at follow-up (e.g. a baseline SpO2 of 86.6%, 5th percentile 91.9%, or a deSaturation frequency of 165 per 12 h of recording, 95th percentile 32) had had values well within the normal range during their initial recording (a baseline SpO2 of 94.4%, or a deSaturation frequency of 4). Most of the deSaturations in the infants with extreme values were associated with periodic apnoea. These results demonstrate only relatively minor developmental changes in Oxygenation in term neonates during the first 4 weeks of life. The clinical significance of outlying values, i.e. a low baseline SpO2 or a high number of episodic deSaturations, remains to be determined.

  • Arterial Oxygen Saturation in preterm neonates without respiratory failure
    The Journal of Pediatrics, 1993
    Co-Authors: David Richard, Christian F. Poets, V. A. Stebbens, Stuart Neale, John R Alexander, David P. Southall

    Abstract:

    To obtain normal data on Arterial Oxygen Saturation as measured by pulse oximetry (Sp o 2; Nellcor N200), we obtained 12-hour tape recordings of Sp o 2, photoplethysmographic waveforms, instantaneous pulse rate, and observations of breathing movements on 55 preterm neonates (25 girls) who had been admitted to one of four special care baby units but had no signs of respiratory distress and were breathing room air at 24 hours of age. Their median gestational age at birth was 35 weeks (range, 30 to 36), and their median age at the time of study 1 day (range, 1 to 7). Median baseline Sp o 2, measured only during regular breathing, was 99.4% (range, 90.7 to 100; 5th percentile, 95.5). Ten recordings (18%) contained a total of 83 episodes of deSaturation (defined as a fall in Sp o 2 to ≤80% for ≥4 seconds). The 95th percentile for deSaturation frequency was eight per recording. One infant had 55 episodes of deSaturation and thus accounted for two thirds of all episodes observed. Only one of the episodes of deSaturation in this infant, and none of those in the other nine infants, had been noted clinically, nor had the abnormally low baseline Sp o 2 (90.7%) in one infant. Baseline Sp o 2 in these nondistressed preterm neonates was higher than might be expected, given the Sp o 2 levels currently recommended for preterm infants with respiratory failure. A minority of infants, however, had a low baseline Sp o 2 or a high frequency of episodes of deSaturation, the potential effects of which remain to be determined.

Robert Frithiof – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Measuring Arterial Oxygen Saturation from an intraosseous photoplethysmographic signal derived from the sternum
    Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing, 2019
    Co-Authors: Erik Näslund, Lars-göran Lindberg, Iréne Lund, Lui Näslund-koch, Agneta Larsson, Robert Frithiof

    Abstract:

    Photoplethysmography performed on the peripheral extremities or the earlobes cannot always provide sufficiently rapid and accurate calculation of Arterial Oxygen Saturation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a novel photoplethysmography prototype to be fixed over the sternum. Our hypotheses were that Arterial Oxygen Saturation can be determined from an intraosseous photoplethysmography signal from the sternum and that such monitoring detects hypoxemia faster than pulse oximetry at standard sites. Sixteen healthy male volunteers were subjected to incremental hypoxemia using different gas mixtures with decreasing Oxygen content. The sternal probe was calibrated using Arterial haemoglobin CO-oximetry (S_aO_2%). Sternal probe readings (S_RHO_2%) were then compared to S_aO_2% at various degrees of hypoxia. The time to detect hypoxemia was compared to measurements from standard finger and ear pulse oximeters. A significant association from individual regression between S_RHO_2% and S_aO_2% was found (r^2 0.97), Spearman R ranged between 0.71 and 0.92 for the different inhaled gas mixtures. Limits of agreement according to Bland–Altman plots had a increased interval with decreasing Arterial Oxygen Saturation. The sternal probe detected hypoxemia 28.7 s faster than a finger probe (95% CI 20.0-37.4 s, p 

  • Measuring Arterial Oxygen Saturation from an intraosseous photoplethysmographic signal derived from the sternum.
    Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing, 2019
    Co-Authors: Erik Näslund, Lars-göran Lindberg, Iréne Lund, Lui Näslund-koch, Agneta Larsson, Robert Frithiof

    Abstract:

    Photoplethysmography performed on the peripheral extremities or the earlobes cannot always provide sufficiently rapid and accurate calculation of Arterial Oxygen Saturation. The purpose of this stu …