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Arteriovenous Shunt

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Teiji Tominaga – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • spinal dural Arteriovenous Shunt presenting with intramedullary hemorrhage case report
    Journal of Neurosurgery, 2014
    Co-Authors: Ayumi Narisawa, Toshiki Endo, Kenichi Sato, Mika Watanabe, Akira Takahashi, Teiji Tominaga

    Abstract:

    The authors report on a 49-year-old man with a thoracic spinal dural Arteriovenous Shunt (dAVS) in which rupture of a varix caused intramedullary hemorrhage. In the literature, patients with a thoracic dAVS predominantly present with congestive myelopathy; however, the patient featured in this report presented without increased deep tendon reflexes or muscle weakness, but instead with intermittent stabbing chest pain and paresthesia. Magnetic resonance images and angiograms demonstrated tortuous enlargement and the formation of a varix-like structure of the draining veins, features compatible with those of high-flow angiopathy. Recognition of this phenomenon is important in thoracic dAVS because intramedullary hemorrhage dramatically degrades outcome. A high index of clinical suspicion can prevent a similar case of thoracic dAVS from progressing to intramedullary hemorrhage.

  • cognard type v intracranial dural Arteriovenous Shunt case reports and literature review with special consideration of the pattern of spinal venous drainage
    Neurosurgery, 2014
    Co-Authors: Shinya Haryu, Toshiki Endo, Kenichi Sato, Akira Takahashi, Takashi Inoue, Teiji Tominaga

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND AND IMPORTANCE: Prompt diagnosis of intracranial dural Arteriovenous Shunt (DAVS) with spinal venous drainage, classified as Cognard type V, is difficult. We investigated the angiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of Cognard type V DAVS to determine the reason for the difficulty in early diagnosis. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: We systematically reviewed 54 published and 3 new cases of Cognard type V DAVS. The pattern of venous drainage was classified on the basis of relative dominance of the anterior and posterior spinal veins with the use of angiograms. T2-weighted sagittal MRIs were used to detect signal flow voids of enlarged spinal veins. Types of venous drainage were determined in 49 of the 57 cases. Twenty-eight and 8 cases showed a dominance of anterior and posterior spinal venous drainage, respectively. In 13 cases, venous drainage was equally distributed through the anterior and posterior spinal veins. Of 41 cases with an abnormally dilated anterior spinal vein, MRIs were available for 25 cases. Signal flow voids of enlarged anterior spinal veins were detected in 9 cases (36.0%), whereas dilatation of the posterior spinal veins was apparent in 9 of 16 cases (56.3%). Overall, MRI detected enlargement of either anterior or posterior spinal veins in 15 of 41 cases (36.6%). CONCLUSION: In Cognard type V DAVS, anterior venous drainage is dominant. Because the anterior spinal veins are located subpially, flow voids are less prominent on sagittal T2-weighted MRI. This may lead to difficulties in diagnosing. Evaluation with MR angiography may compensate for these limitations.

  • cognard type v intracranial dural Arteriovenous Shunt case reports and literature review with special consideration of the pattern of spinal venous drainage
    Neurosurgery, 2014
    Co-Authors: Shinya Haryu, Toshiki Endo, Kenichi Sato, Akira Takahashi, Takashi Inoue, Teiji Tominaga

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND AND IMPORTANCE Prompt diagnosis of intracranial dural Arteriovenous Shunt (DAVS) with spinal venous drainage, classified as Cognard type V, is difficult. We investigated the angiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of Cognard type V DAVS to determine the reason for the difficulty in early diagnosis. CLINICAL PRESENTATION We systematically reviewed 54 published and 3 new cases of Cognard type V DAVS. The pattern of venous drainage was classified on the basis of relative dominance of the anterior and posterior spinal veins with the use of angiograms. T2-weighted sagittal MRIs were used to detect signal flow voids of enlarged spinal veins. Types of venous drainage were determined in 49 of the 57 cases. Twenty-eight and 8 cases showed a dominance of anterior and posterior spinal venous drainage, respectively. In 13 cases, venous drainage was equally distributed through the anterior and posterior spinal veins. Of 41 cases with an abnormally dilated anterior spinal vein, MRIs were available for 25 cases. Signal flow voids of enlarged anterior spinal veins were detected in 9 cases (36.0%), whereas dilatation of the posterior spinal veins was apparent in 9 of 16 cases (56.3%). Overall, MRI detected enlargement of either anterior or posterior spinal veins in 15 of 41 cases (36.6%). CONCLUSION In Cognard type V DAVS, anterior venous drainage is dominant. Because the anterior spinal veins are located subpially, flow voids are less prominent on sagittal T2-weighted MRI. This may lead to difficulties in diagnosing. Evaluation with MR angiography may compensate for these limitations.

Akira Takahashi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • spinal dural Arteriovenous Shunt presenting with intramedullary hemorrhage case report
    Journal of Neurosurgery, 2014
    Co-Authors: Ayumi Narisawa, Toshiki Endo, Kenichi Sato, Mika Watanabe, Akira Takahashi, Teiji Tominaga

    Abstract:

    The authors report on a 49-year-old man with a thoracic spinal dural Arteriovenous Shunt (dAVS) in which rupture of a varix caused intramedullary hemorrhage. In the literature, patients with a thoracic dAVS predominantly present with congestive myelopathy; however, the patient featured in this report presented without increased deep tendon reflexes or muscle weakness, but instead with intermittent stabbing chest pain and paresthesia. Magnetic resonance images and angiograms demonstrated tortuous enlargement and the formation of a varix-like structure of the draining veins, features compatible with those of high-flow angiopathy. Recognition of this phenomenon is important in thoracic dAVS because intramedullary hemorrhage dramatically degrades outcome. A high index of clinical suspicion can prevent a similar case of thoracic dAVS from progressing to intramedullary hemorrhage.

  • cognard type v intracranial dural Arteriovenous Shunt case reports and literature review with special consideration of the pattern of spinal venous drainage
    Neurosurgery, 2014
    Co-Authors: Shinya Haryu, Toshiki Endo, Kenichi Sato, Akira Takahashi, Takashi Inoue, Teiji Tominaga

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND AND IMPORTANCE: Prompt diagnosis of intracranial dural Arteriovenous Shunt (DAVS) with spinal venous drainage, classified as Cognard type V, is difficult. We investigated the angiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of Cognard type V DAVS to determine the reason for the difficulty in early diagnosis. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: We systematically reviewed 54 published and 3 new cases of Cognard type V DAVS. The pattern of venous drainage was classified on the basis of relative dominance of the anterior and posterior spinal veins with the use of angiograms. T2-weighted sagittal MRIs were used to detect signal flow voids of enlarged spinal veins. Types of venous drainage were determined in 49 of the 57 cases. Twenty-eight and 8 cases showed a dominance of anterior and posterior spinal venous drainage, respectively. In 13 cases, venous drainage was equally distributed through the anterior and posterior spinal veins. Of 41 cases with an abnormally dilated anterior spinal vein, MRIs were available for 25 cases. Signal flow voids of enlarged anterior spinal veins were detected in 9 cases (36.0%), whereas dilatation of the posterior spinal veins was apparent in 9 of 16 cases (56.3%). Overall, MRI detected enlargement of either anterior or posterior spinal veins in 15 of 41 cases (36.6%). CONCLUSION: In Cognard type V DAVS, anterior venous drainage is dominant. Because the anterior spinal veins are located subpially, flow voids are less prominent on sagittal T2-weighted MRI. This may lead to difficulties in diagnosing. Evaluation with MR angiography may compensate for these limitations.

  • cognard type v intracranial dural Arteriovenous Shunt case reports and literature review with special consideration of the pattern of spinal venous drainage
    Neurosurgery, 2014
    Co-Authors: Shinya Haryu, Toshiki Endo, Kenichi Sato, Akira Takahashi, Takashi Inoue, Teiji Tominaga

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND AND IMPORTANCE Prompt diagnosis of intracranial dural Arteriovenous Shunt (DAVS) with spinal venous drainage, classified as Cognard type V, is difficult. We investigated the angiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of Cognard type V DAVS to determine the reason for the difficulty in early diagnosis. CLINICAL PRESENTATION We systematically reviewed 54 published and 3 new cases of Cognard type V DAVS. The pattern of venous drainage was classified on the basis of relative dominance of the anterior and posterior spinal veins with the use of angiograms. T2-weighted sagittal MRIs were used to detect signal flow voids of enlarged spinal veins. Types of venous drainage were determined in 49 of the 57 cases. Twenty-eight and 8 cases showed a dominance of anterior and posterior spinal venous drainage, respectively. In 13 cases, venous drainage was equally distributed through the anterior and posterior spinal veins. Of 41 cases with an abnormally dilated anterior spinal vein, MRIs were available for 25 cases. Signal flow voids of enlarged anterior spinal veins were detected in 9 cases (36.0%), whereas dilatation of the posterior spinal veins was apparent in 9 of 16 cases (56.3%). Overall, MRI detected enlargement of either anterior or posterior spinal veins in 15 of 41 cases (36.6%). CONCLUSION In Cognard type V DAVS, anterior venous drainage is dominant. Because the anterior spinal veins are located subpially, flow voids are less prominent on sagittal T2-weighted MRI. This may lead to difficulties in diagnosing. Evaluation with MR angiography may compensate for these limitations.

Shinya Haryu – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • cognard type v intracranial dural Arteriovenous Shunt case reports and literature review with special consideration of the pattern of spinal venous drainage
    Neurosurgery, 2014
    Co-Authors: Shinya Haryu, Toshiki Endo, Kenichi Sato, Akira Takahashi, Takashi Inoue, Teiji Tominaga

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND AND IMPORTANCE: Prompt diagnosis of intracranial dural Arteriovenous Shunt (DAVS) with spinal venous drainage, classified as Cognard type V, is difficult. We investigated the angiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of Cognard type V DAVS to determine the reason for the difficulty in early diagnosis. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: We systematically reviewed 54 published and 3 new cases of Cognard type V DAVS. The pattern of venous drainage was classified on the basis of relative dominance of the anterior and posterior spinal veins with the use of angiograms. T2-weighted sagittal MRIs were used to detect signal flow voids of enlarged spinal veins. Types of venous drainage were determined in 49 of the 57 cases. Twenty-eight and 8 cases showed a dominance of anterior and posterior spinal venous drainage, respectively. In 13 cases, venous drainage was equally distributed through the anterior and posterior spinal veins. Of 41 cases with an abnormally dilated anterior spinal vein, MRIs were available for 25 cases. Signal flow voids of enlarged anterior spinal veins were detected in 9 cases (36.0%), whereas dilatation of the posterior spinal veins was apparent in 9 of 16 cases (56.3%). Overall, MRI detected enlargement of either anterior or posterior spinal veins in 15 of 41 cases (36.6%). CONCLUSION: In Cognard type V DAVS, anterior venous drainage is dominant. Because the anterior spinal veins are located subpially, flow voids are less prominent on sagittal T2-weighted MRI. This may lead to difficulties in diagnosing. Evaluation with MR angiography may compensate for these limitations.

  • cognard type v intracranial dural Arteriovenous Shunt case reports and literature review with special consideration of the pattern of spinal venous drainage
    Neurosurgery, 2014
    Co-Authors: Shinya Haryu, Toshiki Endo, Kenichi Sato, Akira Takahashi, Takashi Inoue, Teiji Tominaga

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND AND IMPORTANCE Prompt diagnosis of intracranial dural Arteriovenous Shunt (DAVS) with spinal venous drainage, classified as Cognard type V, is difficult. We investigated the angiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of Cognard type V DAVS to determine the reason for the difficulty in early diagnosis. CLINICAL PRESENTATION We systematically reviewed 54 published and 3 new cases of Cognard type V DAVS. The pattern of venous drainage was classified on the basis of relative dominance of the anterior and posterior spinal veins with the use of angiograms. T2-weighted sagittal MRIs were used to detect signal flow voids of enlarged spinal veins. Types of venous drainage were determined in 49 of the 57 cases. Twenty-eight and 8 cases showed a dominance of anterior and posterior spinal venous drainage, respectively. In 13 cases, venous drainage was equally distributed through the anterior and posterior spinal veins. Of 41 cases with an abnormally dilated anterior spinal vein, MRIs were available for 25 cases. Signal flow voids of enlarged anterior spinal veins were detected in 9 cases (36.0%), whereas dilatation of the posterior spinal veins was apparent in 9 of 16 cases (56.3%). Overall, MRI detected enlargement of either anterior or posterior spinal veins in 15 of 41 cases (36.6%). CONCLUSION In Cognard type V DAVS, anterior venous drainage is dominant. Because the anterior spinal veins are located subpially, flow voids are less prominent on sagittal T2-weighted MRI. This may lead to difficulties in diagnosing. Evaluation with MR angiography may compensate for these limitations.