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Artery Clamp

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Mistre Alemayehu – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • abstract 14370 randomized trial of short vs ultra short radial Artery Clamp time post trans radial cardiac catheterization
    Circulation, 2016
    Co-Authors: Shahar Lavi, Andrew Yadegari, Asim N Cheema, Rodrigo Bagur, Nour Aburomeh, Yaniv Levi, Yasir Parviz, Zeev Israeli, Kokab Awan, Mistre Alemayehu

    Abstract:

    Introduction: Radial Artery occlusion (RAO) is a known complication following transradial cardiac catheterization. A shorter duration of radial Clamp time post procedure may reduce this risk. Howev…

Shahar Lavi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • abstract 14370 randomized trial of short vs ultra short radial Artery Clamp time post trans radial cardiac catheterization
    Circulation, 2016
    Co-Authors: Shahar Lavi, Andrew Yadegari, Asim N Cheema, Rodrigo Bagur, Nour Aburomeh, Yaniv Levi, Yasir Parviz, Zeev Israeli, Kokab Awan, Mistre Alemayehu

    Abstract:

    Introduction: Radial Artery occlusion (RAO) is a known complication following transradial cardiac catheterization. A shorter duration of radial Clamp time post procedure may reduce this risk. Howev…

Y. K. Kirby – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • evaluation of logistic versus linear regression models for predicting pulmonary hypertension syndrome ascites using cold exposure or pulmonary Artery Clamp models in broilers
    Poultry Science, 1997
    Co-Authors: Y. K. Kirby, Ronald W Mcnew, John D Kirby, Robert F. Wideman

    Abstract:

    Abstract Syndromes such as ascites (pulmonary hypertension syndrome) present difficulties both in the interpretation of associated physiological observations and in their analyses. The ability to predict which physiological variables have the greatest influence on survival or, more importantly, which individuals are most susceptible or resistant to ascites would be very useful selection tools. When addressed in this manner, ascites data become binary data sets (healthy or affected). Binary data can be problematic in that they do not meet all of the assumptions necessary for more traditional analyses such as ANOVA and linear regression. Binary data are discrete and do not have normally distributed errors, which violates a fundamental assumption of linear models. The predictive abilities of linear and logistic regression were evaluated in two replicated experiments using two methods to induce ascites, cold exposure (COLD) and surgical Clamping of one pulmonary Artery (PAC). The logistic and linear predictive models were derived using the same data and variables. The first data set from PAC and COLD were used to develop the predictive models and the replicate data sets of PAC and COLD were used as “test data sets” for the prediction of ascites. The linear models developed were complex, using four or five variables and requiring up to seven different measurements. On average, the linear models predicted ascites correctly 87.6% of the time. The logistic models were simple (single variable) models that predicted ascites correctly 92.0% of the time. The variables used in the logistic models were derivations of the ratio of right ventricular weight to total ventricular weight, either corrected for age or the body weight of the bird. Although linear regression predicted the incidence of ascites almost as well as logistic regression did, logistic regression is the more appropriate test statistic to use.

  • A Pulmonary Artery Clamp Model for Inducing Pulmonary Hypertension Syndrome (Ascites) in Broilers
    Poultry Science, 1995
    Co-Authors: Robert F. Wideman, Y. K. Kirby

    Abstract:

    Two experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that a primary increase in pulmonary vascular resistance can initiate a pathophysiological progression leading to pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS, ascites). Pulmonary vascular resistance was increased by surgically Clamping the left pulmonary Artery when male broiler chicks were 15 to 19 d of age, resulting in a 90% incidence of PHS in Experiment 1, and a 68% incidence of PHS in Experiment 2. The incidence of PHS was 8% for control or sham-operated broilers in Experiment 1, whereas in Experiment 2 no (0%) PHS occurred in sham-operated broilers or in individuals with a pulmonary Artery that only was partially occluded. Broilers with a fully occluded left pulmonary Artery developed pulmonary hypertension, as demonstrated by increased right:total ventricular weight ratios (right ventricular hypertrophy) and by increased electrocardiogram lead II R-S wave amplitudes (generalized ventricular dilation and hypertrophy). Forcing the entire cardiac output through the right lung resulted in a lower percentage saturation of hemoglobin with oxygen and an elevated hematocrit, reflecting generalized systemic hypoxemia. Pulmonary hypertension and hypoxemia also were specifically characteristic of all birds that developed ascites, regardless of treatment group. These observations demonstrate for the first time that PHS (ascites) can be directly induced by a primary increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. The observed changes in percentage saturation of hemoglobin with oxygen suggest that the lungs of broilers may be unable to efficiently oxygenate the blood when forced to receive an increased cardiac output at an elevated pulmonary arterial pressure.