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Arthropathy

The Experts below are selected from a list of 288 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Ranjan Gupta – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • rotator cuff tear Arthropathy
    Journal of The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 2007
    Co-Authors: Kier J Ecklund, James E Tibone, Ranjan Gupta

    Abstract:

    : Rotator cuff tear Arthropathy represents a spectrum of shoulder pathology characterized by rotator cuff insufficiency, diminished acromiohumeral distance with impingement syndromes, and arthritic changes of the glenohumeral joint. Additional features may include subdeltoid effusion, humeral head erosion, and acetabularization of the acromion. Although the progression of rotator cuff tears seems to play a role in the development of cuff tear Arthropathy, information is lacking regarding the natural progression of rotator cuff tears to cuff tear Arthropathy. Controversy remains about the role of basic calcium phosphate crystals in the development of cuff tear Arthropathy. Nonsurgical management is the first line of treatment in most patients. Traditionally, surgical management of rotator cuff tear Arthropathy has been disappointing because of the development of complications long-term and poor patient satisfaction with functional outcomes. Recent studies, however, report promising experience with reverse ball-and-socket arthroplasty.

Russell F Warren – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • rotator cuff tear Arthropathy evaluation diagnosis and treatment aaos exhibit selection
    Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery American Volume, 2012
    Co-Authors: Travis G Maak, Bradley S Raphael, Christopher K Kepler, Michael B Cross, Russell F Warren

    Abstract:

    Abstract: Rotator cuff tear Arthropathy encompasses a broad spectrum of pathology, but it involves at least three critical features: rotator cuff insufficiency, degenerative changes of the glenohumeral joint, and superior migration of the humeral head. Although many patients possess altered biomechanics of the glenohumeral joint secondary to rotator cuff pathology, not all patients develop rotator cuff tear Arthropathy, and thus the exact etiology of rotator cuff tear Arthropathy remains unclear. The objectives of this manuscript are to (1) review the biomechanical properties of the rotator cuff and the glenohumeral joint, (2) discuss the proposed causes of rotator cuff tear Arthropathy, (3) provide a brief review of the historically used surgical options to treat rotator cuff tear Arthropathy, and (4) present a treatment algorithm for rotator cuff tear Arthropathy based on a patient’s clinical presentation, functional goals, and anatomic integrity.

Bernhard F Morrey – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • hemophilic Arthropathy of the elbow treated by total elbow replacement
    Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery American Volume, 2004
    Co-Authors: Srinath Kamineni, Robert A Adams, Shawn W Odriscoll, Bernhard F Morrey

    Abstract:

    Hemophilic Arthropathy most commonly affects the knee, with the elbow being the second most frequently involved joint1. The recurrent intra-articular hemorrhages that cause this form of inflammatory Arthropathy are a feature of severe hemophilia in which <1% of the normal clotting factor titers are present. Whereas total joint replacement is a well-documented treatment for hemophilic hip and knee Arthropathy2-5, there are very few reports of total elbow replacements in patients with hemophilia. Possible reasons for this lack of published data include (1) the predominant and successful medical management of most patients with hemophilia, (2) less functional impairment of the elbow compared with the hip and knee in hemophilic Arthropathy, and (3) the more recent successful evolution of total elbow arthroplasty compared with the more established hip and knee arthroplasties. Our aim is to share our experience with total elbow arthroplasty in patients with hemophilic Arthropathy and to review the cases reported in the literature.

    We retrospectively reviewed the records on 3100 patients with hemophilia who had presented to our institution and on 1358 total elbow replacements performed at our institution between 1979 and 2001. Five patients had had total elbow replacement for the treatment of hemophilic Arthropathy (Table I), and we further analyzed those cases.

    View this table:

    TABLE I
    Data on Five Patients with Hemophilia and a Total Elbow Arthroplasty

    The mean age of the five patients was thirty-nine years (range, twenty-five to fifty-eight years). The elbow on the dominant side was involved in one patient, the elbow on the nondominant side was involved in one patient, and both elbows were involved in three patients. The primary hematological abnormality was hemophilia A (factor-VIII deficiency) in two patients and hemophilia A and B (factor-VIII and IX deficiency), hemophilia C (von Willebrand disease), and hemophilia A with factor-VIII inhibitor in …

  • Hemophilic Arthropathy of the Elbow Treated by Total Elbow Replacement
    Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery American Volume, 2004
    Co-Authors: Srinath Kamineni, Robert A Adams, Shawn W. O'driscoll, Bernhard F Morrey

    Abstract:

    Hemophilic Arthropathy most commonly affects the knee, with the elbow being the second most frequently involved joint1. The recurrent intra-articular hemorrhages that cause this form of inflammatory Arthropathy are a feature of severe hemophilia in which