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Arthroscopic Probe

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A C Hall – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • how benign is the Arthroscopic Probe a laboratory based study using bovine and human joints
    Orthopaedic Proceedings, 2018
    Co-Authors: E K Davidson, T O White, A C Hall

    Abstract:

    Articular cartilage has very poor repair potential, however it has an extraordinary capacity to withstand physiological mechanical loads in an intact joint. The nature and extent of chondrocyte death in articular cartilage following many forms of injury (trephine, scalpel, osteotome, sutures and drilling) has been characterised, but the ability to bear mechanical injury from iatrogenic surgical interventions is still unknown.A standard Arthroscopic Probe was moved at varying physiological pressures along the articular cartilage of joint before staining with fluorescent dyes to allow live/dead cell imaging using laser confocal scanning microscopy and imaging software, Image J. Bovine metatarsal phalangeal joints and fresh human cadaveric femoral condyles were used.The Probe caused statistically significant chondrocyte death in bovine cartilage (p=0.02). Mild pressure 5% cell death, moderate (standard Arthroscopic technique pressure) 22% and severe pressure 38%. A similar result was seen in human tissue wit…

  • how benign is the Arthroscopic Probe a laboratory based study using bovine and human joints
    Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery-british Volume, 2015
    Co-Authors: E K Davidson, T O White, A C Hall

    Abstract:

    Articular cartilage has very poor repair potential, however it has an extraordinary capacity to withstand physiological mechanical loads in an intact joint. The nature and extent of chondrocyte death in articular cartilage following many forms of injury (trephine, scalpel, osteotome, sutures and drilling) has been characterised, but the ability to bear mechanical injury from iatrogenic surgical interventions is still unknown. A standard Arthroscopic Probe was moved at varying physiological pressures along the articular cartilage of joint before staining with fluorescent dyes to allow live/dead cell imaging using laser confocal scanning microscopy and imaging software, Image J. Bovine metatarsal phalangeal joints and fresh human cadaveric femoral condyles were used. The Probe caused statistically significant chondrocyte death in bovine cartilage (p=0.02). Mild pressure 5% cell death, moderate (standard Arthroscopic technique pressure) 22% and severe pressure 38%. A similar result was seen in human tissue with 24% cell death at moderate pressure compared to a control (p=0.0699). The widely assumed benign Arthroscopic Probe produces significant cell death in articular cartilage when used at standard operating pressures.

E K Davidson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • how benign is the Arthroscopic Probe a laboratory based study using bovine and human joints
    Orthopaedic Proceedings, 2018
    Co-Authors: E K Davidson, T O White, A C Hall

    Abstract:

    Articular cartilage has very poor repair potential, however it has an extraordinary capacity to withstand physiological mechanical loads in an intact joint. The nature and extent of chondrocyte death in articular cartilage following many forms of injury (trephine, scalpel, osteotome, sutures and drilling) has been characterised, but the ability to bear mechanical injury from iatrogenic surgical interventions is still unknown.A standard Arthroscopic Probe was moved at varying physiological pressures along the articular cartilage of joint before staining with fluorescent dyes to allow live/dead cell imaging using laser confocal scanning microscopy and imaging software, Image J. Bovine metatarsal phalangeal joints and fresh human cadaveric femoral condyles were used.The Probe caused statistically significant chondrocyte death in bovine cartilage (p=0.02). Mild pressure 5% cell death, moderate (standard Arthroscopic technique pressure) 22% and severe pressure 38%. A similar result was seen in human tissue wit…

  • how benign is the Arthroscopic Probe a laboratory based study using bovine and human joints
    Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery-british Volume, 2015
    Co-Authors: E K Davidson, T O White, A C Hall

    Abstract:

    Articular cartilage has very poor repair potential, however it has an extraordinary capacity to withstand physiological mechanical loads in an intact joint. The nature and extent of chondrocyte death in articular cartilage following many forms of injury (trephine, scalpel, osteotome, sutures and drilling) has been characterised, but the ability to bear mechanical injury from iatrogenic surgical interventions is still unknown. A standard Arthroscopic Probe was moved at varying physiological pressures along the articular cartilage of joint before staining with fluorescent dyes to allow live/dead cell imaging using laser confocal scanning microscopy and imaging software, Image J. Bovine metatarsal phalangeal joints and fresh human cadaveric femoral condyles were used. The Probe caused statistically significant chondrocyte death in bovine cartilage (p=0.02). Mild pressure 5% cell death, moderate (standard Arthroscopic technique pressure) 22% and severe pressure 38%. A similar result was seen in human tissue with 24% cell death at moderate pressure compared to a control (p=0.0699). The widely assumed benign Arthroscopic Probe produces significant cell death in articular cartilage when used at standard operating pressures.

T O White – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • how benign is the Arthroscopic Probe a laboratory based study using bovine and human joints
    Orthopaedic Proceedings, 2018
    Co-Authors: E K Davidson, T O White, A C Hall

    Abstract:

    Articular cartilage has very poor repair potential, however it has an extraordinary capacity to withstand physiological mechanical loads in an intact joint. The nature and extent of chondrocyte death in articular cartilage following many forms of injury (trephine, scalpel, osteotome, sutures and drilling) has been characterised, but the ability to bear mechanical injury from iatrogenic surgical interventions is still unknown.A standard Arthroscopic Probe was moved at varying physiological pressures along the articular cartilage of joint before staining with fluorescent dyes to allow live/dead cell imaging using laser confocal scanning microscopy and imaging software, Image J. Bovine metatarsal phalangeal joints and fresh human cadaveric femoral condyles were used.The Probe caused statistically significant chondrocyte death in bovine cartilage (p=0.02). Mild pressure 5% cell death, moderate (standard Arthroscopic technique pressure) 22% and severe pressure 38%. A similar result was seen in human tissue wit…

  • how benign is the Arthroscopic Probe a laboratory based study using bovine and human joints
    Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery-british Volume, 2015
    Co-Authors: E K Davidson, T O White, A C Hall

    Abstract:

    Articular cartilage has very poor repair potential, however it has an extraordinary capacity to withstand physiological mechanical loads in an intact joint. The nature and extent of chondrocyte death in articular cartilage following many forms of injury (trephine, scalpel, osteotome, sutures and drilling) has been characterised, but the ability to bear mechanical injury from iatrogenic surgical interventions is still unknown. A standard Arthroscopic Probe was moved at varying physiological pressures along the articular cartilage of joint before staining with fluorescent dyes to allow live/dead cell imaging using laser confocal scanning microscopy and imaging software, Image J. Bovine metatarsal phalangeal joints and fresh human cadaveric femoral condyles were used. The Probe caused statistically significant chondrocyte death in bovine cartilage (p=0.02). Mild pressure 5% cell death, moderate (standard Arthroscopic technique pressure) 22% and severe pressure 38%. A similar result was seen in human tissue with 24% cell death at moderate pressure compared to a control (p=0.0699). The widely assumed benign Arthroscopic Probe produces significant cell death in articular cartilage when used at standard operating pressures.