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Brian D. Busconi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Hip Arthroscopy in the pediatric population : Hip Arthroscopy
    Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 2003
    Co-Authors: Nicola A. Deangelis, Brian D. Busconi

    Abstract:

    Hip Arthroscopy has obvious advantages over arthrotomy in the pediatric population. Hip Arthroscopy, used as a diagnostic or therapeutic tool, is significantly less invasive than arthrotomy and allows for quicker recovery and return to activities. In addition, Arthroscopy avoids dislocation of the femoral head and the corresponding risk of osteonecrosis. Current indications for hip Arthroscopy in pediatric patients include septic arthritis, labral disorders, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, and Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. The role of hip Arthroscopy in the pediatric population will continue to expand because of its attractiveness as a less invasive option for evaluating the hip.

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  • Hip Arthroscopy in the pediatric population.
    Clinical orthopaedics and related research, 2003
    Co-Authors: Nicola A. Deangelis, Brian D. Busconi

    Abstract:

    Hip Arthroscopy has obvious advantages over arthrotomy in the pediatric population. Hip Arthroscopy, used as a diagnostic or therapeutic tool, is significantly less invasive than arthrotomy and allows for quicker recovery and return to activities. In addition, Arthroscopy avoids dislocation of the femoral head and the corresponding risk of osteonecrosis. Current indications for hip Arthroscopy in pediatric patients include septic arthritis, labral disorders, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, and Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. The role of hip Arthroscopy in the pediatric population will continue to expand because of its attractiveness as a less invasive option for evaluating the hip.

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Vikas Khanduja – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • History of hip Arthroscopy
    Journal of Arthroscopic Surgery and Sports Medicine, 2020
    Co-Authors: Shivani Shukla, Matthew Pettit, Karadi Hari Sunil Kumar, Vikas Khanduja

    Abstract:

    Hip Arthroscopy is a minimally invasive therapeutic and diagnostic procedure appropriate for an evolving list of conditions. It is routinely used for the treatment of intra- and extra-articular pathology of the hip joint. The development of endoscopy paved the way for the development of Arthroscopy. Hip Arthroscopy was first described in 1931 by Michael Burman, and its widespread adoption was only achieved some 60 years later during the 1990s. Dr. Watanabe, from Japan, has been credited with the development of modern Arthroscopy for his work in developing a practical arthroscope and advancement of both explorative Arthroscopy and surgical arthroscopic techniques. More recently, the use of distraction proved as a significant step in the utility of hip Arthroscopy and paved the way for future innovations in the procedure. The authors provide a brief overview of the history hip Arthroscopy, relevant developments which have paved the way for this procedure and the current state of Arthroscopy as a diagnostic and therapeutic procedure.

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  • The learning curves of a validated virtual reality hip Arthroscopy simulator
    Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, 2020
    Co-Authors: Jonathan D. Bartlett, Emmanuel Audenaert, John E Lawrence, Borna Guevel, Max E. Stewart, Vikas Khanduja

    Abstract:

    Introduction Decreases in trainees’ working hours, coupled with evidence of worse outcomes when hip arthroscopies are performed by inexperienced surgeons, mandate an additional means of training. Though virtual reality simulation has been adopted by other surgical specialities, its slow uptake in arthroscopic training is due to a lack of evidence as to its benefits. These benefits can be demonstrated through learning curves associated with simulator training—with practice reflecting increases in validated performance metrics. Methods Twenty-five medical students with no previous experience of hip Arthroscopy completed seven weekly simulated arthroscopies of a healthy virtual hip joint using a 70° arthroscope in the supine position. Twelve targets were visualised within the central compartment, six via the anterior portal, three via the anterolateral portal and three via the posterolateral portal. Task duration, number of collisions (bone and soft-tissue), and distance travelled by arthroscope were measured by the simulator for every session of each student. Results Learning curves were demonstrated by the students, with improvements in time taken, number of collisions (bone and soft-tissue), collision length and efficiency of movement (all p  

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  • the learning curves of a validated virtual reality hip Arthroscopy simulator
    Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, 2020
    Co-Authors: Jonathan Bartlett, Emmanuel Audenaert, John E Lawrence, Borna Guevel, Max E. Stewart, Vikas Khanduja

    Abstract:

    Decreases in trainees’ working hours, coupled with evidence of worse outcomes when hip arthroscopies are performed by inexperienced surgeons, mandate an additional means of training. Though virtual reality simulation has been adopted by other surgical specialities, its slow uptake in arthroscopic training is due to a lack of evidence as to its benefits. These benefits can be demonstrated through learning curves associated with simulator training—with practice reflecting increases in validated performance metrics. Twenty-five medical students with no previous experience of hip Arthroscopy completed seven weekly simulated arthroscopies of a healthy virtual hip joint using a 70° arthroscope in the supine position. Twelve targets were visualised within the central compartment, six via the anterior portal, three via the anterolateral portal and three via the posterolateral portal. Task duration, number of collisions (bone and soft-tissue), and distance travelled by arthroscope were measured by the simulator for every session of each student. Learning curves were demonstrated by the students, with improvements in time taken, number of collisions (bone and soft-tissue), collision length and efficiency of movement (all p < 0.01). Improvements in time taken, efficiency of movement and number of collisions with soft-tissue were first seen in session 3 and improvements in all other parameters were seen in session 4. No differences were found after session 5 for time taken and length of soft-tissue collision. No differences in number of collisions (bone and soft-tissue), length of collisions with bone, and efficiency of movement were found after session 6. The results of this study demonstrate learning curves for a hip Arthroscopy simulator, with significant improvements seen after three sessions. All performance metrics were found to improved, demonstrating sufficient visuo-haptic consistency within the virtual environment, enabling individuals to develop basic arthroscopic skills.

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Nicola A. Deangelis – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Hip Arthroscopy in the pediatric population : Hip Arthroscopy
    Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 2003
    Co-Authors: Nicola A. Deangelis, Brian D. Busconi

    Abstract:

    Hip Arthroscopy has obvious advantages over arthrotomy in the pediatric population. Hip Arthroscopy, used as a diagnostic or therapeutic tool, is significantly less invasive than arthrotomy and allows for quicker recovery and return to activities. In addition, Arthroscopy avoids dislocation of the femoral head and the corresponding risk of osteonecrosis. Current indications for hip Arthroscopy in pediatric patients include septic arthritis, labral disorders, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, and Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. The role of hip Arthroscopy in the pediatric population will continue to expand because of its attractiveness as a less invasive option for evaluating the hip.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • Hip Arthroscopy in the pediatric population.
    Clinical orthopaedics and related research, 2003
    Co-Authors: Nicola A. Deangelis, Brian D. Busconi

    Abstract:

    Hip Arthroscopy has obvious advantages over arthrotomy in the pediatric population. Hip Arthroscopy, used as a diagnostic or therapeutic tool, is significantly less invasive than arthrotomy and allows for quicker recovery and return to activities. In addition, Arthroscopy avoids dislocation of the femoral head and the corresponding risk of osteonecrosis. Current indications for hip Arthroscopy in pediatric patients include septic arthritis, labral disorders, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, and Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. The role of hip Arthroscopy in the pediatric population will continue to expand because of its attractiveness as a less invasive option for evaluating the hip.

    Free Register to Access Article