Articular Disk - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Articular Disk

The Experts below are selected from a list of 258 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Brian D Adams – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • changes in the tfcc Articular Disk during forearm rotation a study of configuration and surface strains
    , 1994
    Co-Authors: Brian D Adams, Kathy A Holley

    Abstract:

    The triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) of the wrist is a multifunctional structure composed of several anatomical components.10 The horizontal portion of the TFCC, often referred to as the triangular fibrocartilage proper or TFC, is triangular in shape and composed of the Articular Disk and the dorsal and palmar radioulnar ligaments. The TFC forms a continuation of the distal radial Articular surface from its radial attachment at the sigmoid notch to its apical attachment in the eccentric concavity of the ulnar head (fovea) and the projecting ulnar styloid. The Disk provides an interface between the ulnar head and ulnar carpus, with the biconcave shape serving to reduce the geometric incongruencies between the bony surfaces. The peripheral margins of the TFC (radioulnar ligaments) are thicker and composed of longitudinally oriented collagen fibers, structurally adapted to bear tensile loading. The central portion (Articular Disk) is thinner and the collagen fiber pattern has multiple obliquities to the surface, implying that variable loading conditions occur.3,4

  • strains in the Articular Disk of the triangular fibrocartilage complex a biomechanical study
    Journal of Hand Surgery (European Volume), 1993
    Co-Authors: Brian D Adams, Kathy A Holley

    Abstract:

    Abstract The Articular Disk of the triangular fibrocartilage complex was studied using a video imaging system in a cadaveric laboratory experiment. Changes in Disk configuration consistently occurred during pronation and supination and resulted in a nonuniform strain distribution that was dependent upon foream position. Strains occurred primarily in the radioulnar axis of the Disk, with dorsoanterior strains being negligible. Strains were concentrated in the radial portion of the Disk and were highest with the foream pronated. Application of a distraction load to the distal radioulnar joint to simulate the effect of axial wrist loading caused strains to increase the most in the radial portion. These findings suggest that joint distraction loading and forearm pronation are important components of the injury mechanism for the most common type of traumatic tear that occurs near the radial attachment of the Disk.

  • partial excision of the triangular fibrocartilage complex Articular Disk a biomechanical study
    Journal of Hand Surgery (European Volume), 1993
    Co-Authors: Brian D Adams

    Abstract:

    Abstract A cadaver study was performed to evaluate the effects of partial and complete excisions of the Articular Disk of the triangular fibrocartilage complex on the kinematics of the distal radioulnar joint and the structural integrity of the triangular fibrocartilage. An excision that did not violate the peripheral 2 mm of the Disk and that comprised less than two thirds of the Disk area resulted in no significant kinematic or structural changes, but larger excisions produced measurable changes. These results provide further support for limited excision of central triangular fibrocartilage complex tears.

Souhei Furukawa – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • comparison of the t2 relaxation time of the temporomandibular joint Articular Disk between patients with temporomandibular disorders and asymptomatic volunteers
    American Journal of Neuroradiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Naoya Kakimoto, Hiroaki Shimamoto, Jira Chindasombatjaroen, Tomomi Tsujimoto, Seiki Tomita, Yoko Hasegawa, Shumei Murakami, Souhei Furukawa

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: T2 relaxation time is a quantitative MR imaging parameter used to detect degenerated cartilage in the knee and lumbar intervertebral Disks. We measured the T2 relaxation time of the Articular Disk of the temporomandibular joint in patients with temporomandibular disorders and asymptomatic volunteers to demonstrate an association between T2 relaxation time and temporomandibular disorder MR imaging findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred forty-four patients with temporomandibular disorders and 17 volunteers were enrolled in this study. An 8-echo spin-echo sequence for measuring the T2 relaxation times was performed in the closed mouth position, and the T2 relaxation time of the entire Articular Disk was measured. Patients were classified according to the Articular Disk location and function, Articular Disk configuration, presence of joint effusion, osteoarthritis, and bone marrow abnormalities. RESULTS: The T2 relaxation time of the entire Articular Disk was 29.3 3.8 ms in the volunteer group and 30.7 5.1 ms in the patient group (P .177). When subgroups were analyzed, however, the T2 relaxation times of the entire Articular Disk in the anterior Disk displacement without reduction group, the marked or extensive joint effusion group, the osteoarthritis-positive group, and the bone marrow abnormality–positive group were significantly longer than those in the volunteer group (P .05). CONCLUSIONS: The T2 relaxation times of the Articular Disk of the temporomandibular joint in patients with progressive temporomandibular disorders were longer than those of healthy volunteers. ABBREVIATIONS: ADDWOR anterior Disk displacement without reduction; ADDWR anterior Disk displacement with reduction; PADDWOR partial anterior Disk displacement without reduction; PADDWR partial anterior Disk displacement with reduction; TMD temporomandibular disorders; TMJ temporomandibular joint

Kathy A Holley – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • changes in the tfcc Articular Disk during forearm rotation a study of configuration and surface strains
    , 1994
    Co-Authors: Brian D Adams, Kathy A Holley

    Abstract:

    The triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) of the wrist is a multifunctional structure composed of several anatomical components.10 The horizontal portion of the TFCC, often referred to as the triangular fibrocartilage proper or TFC, is triangular in shape and composed of the Articular Disk and the dorsal and palmar radioulnar ligaments. The TFC forms a continuation of the distal radial Articular surface from its radial attachment at the sigmoid notch to its apical attachment in the eccentric concavity of the ulnar head (fovea) and the projecting ulnar styloid. The Disk provides an interface between the ulnar head and ulnar carpus, with the biconcave shape serving to reduce the geometric incongruencies between the bony surfaces. The peripheral margins of the TFC (radioulnar ligaments) are thicker and composed of longitudinally oriented collagen fibers, structurally adapted to bear tensile loading. The central portion (Articular Disk) is thinner and the collagen fiber pattern has multiple obliquities to the surface, implying that variable loading conditions occur.3,4

  • strains in the Articular Disk of the triangular fibrocartilage complex a biomechanical study
    Journal of Hand Surgery (European Volume), 1993
    Co-Authors: Brian D Adams, Kathy A Holley

    Abstract:

    Abstract The Articular Disk of the triangular fibrocartilage complex was studied using a video imaging system in a cadaveric laboratory experiment. Changes in Disk configuration consistently occurred during pronation and supination and resulted in a nonuniform strain distribution that was dependent upon foream position. Strains occurred primarily in the radioulnar axis of the Disk, with dorsoanterior strains being negligible. Strains were concentrated in the radial portion of the Disk and were highest with the foream pronated. Application of a distraction load to the distal radioulnar joint to simulate the effect of axial wrist loading caused strains to increase the most in the radial portion. These findings suggest that joint distraction loading and forearm pronation are important components of the injury mechanism for the most common type of traumatic tear that occurs near the radial attachment of the Disk.