Artificial Feeding - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Artificial Feeding

The Experts below are selected from a list of 249 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Frans Jongejan – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • transmission of rickettsia raoultii and rickettsia massiliae dna by dermacentor reticulatus and rhipicephalus sanguineus s l ticks during Artificial Feeding
    Parasites & Vectors, 2018
    Co-Authors: Emanuela Olivieri, Frans Jongejan, Michiel Wijnveld, Marise Bonga, Laura Berger, M T Manfredi, Fabrizia Veronesi

    Abstract:

    Background
    Tick-borne rickettsial pathogens are emerging worldwide and pose an increased health risk to both humans and animals. A plethora of rickettsial species has been identified in ticks recovered from human and animal patients. However, the detection of rickettsial DNA in ticks does not necessarily mean that these ticks can act as vectors for these pathogens. Here, we used Artificial Feeding of ticks to confirm transmission of Rickettsia massiliae and Rickettsia raoultii by Rhipicephalus sanguineus (sensu lato) and Dermacentor reticulatus ticks, respectively. The speed of transmission was also determined.

Emanuela Olivieri – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • transmission of rickettsia raoultii and rickettsia massiliae dna by dermacentor reticulatus and rhipicephalus sanguineus s l ticks during Artificial Feeding
    Parasites & Vectors, 2018
    Co-Authors: Emanuela Olivieri, Frans Jongejan, Michiel Wijnveld, Marise Bonga, Laura Berger, M T Manfredi, Fabrizia Veronesi

    Abstract:

    Background
    Tick-borne rickettsial pathogens are emerging worldwide and pose an increased health risk to both humans and animals. A plethora of rickettsial species has been identified in ticks recovered from human and animal patients. However, the detection of rickettsial DNA in ticks does not necessarily mean that these ticks can act as vectors for these pathogens. Here, we used Artificial Feeding of ticks to confirm transmission of Rickettsia massiliae and Rickettsia raoultii by Rhipicephalus sanguineus (sensu lato) and Dermacentor reticulatus ticks, respectively. The speed of transmission was also determined.

Abdu F Azad – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • infection and transovarial transmission of rickettsiae in dermacentor variabilis ticks acquired by Artificial Feeding
    Vector-borne and Zoonotic Diseases, 2001
    Co-Authors: Kevin R Macaluso, Daniel E Sonenshine, Shane M Ceraul, Abdu F Azad

    Abstract:

    In this study we examined the efficiency of an in vitro Feeding technique using glass microcapillaries as a method of establishing rickettsiae-infected lines of ticks. To quantify the volume ingested by ticks during microcapillary Feeding, the incorporation of radiolabeled amino acids in tick gut and hemolymph was calculated. Fifteen of 18 ticks consumed between 0.06 and 6.77 µl. However, ingestion of fluid was not correlated to weight gain during capillary Feeding. Uninfected and partially fed laboratory-reared female Dermacentor variabilis ticks were exposed to either Rickettsia montana- or Rickettsia rhipicephali-infected Vero cells via microcapillary tubes, returned to rabbit hosts, and allowed to feed to repletion. All tissues collected from ticks allowed to feed overnight on rickettsiae-infected fluids were found to be infected when examined by IFA. When rickettsiae-infected and uninfected capillary-fed ticks were allowed to feed to repletion and lay eggs, no significant differences in mean engorgem…