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Artificial Lighting

The Experts below are selected from a list of 14886 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

A J F Rutten – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • sky luminance research imperative for adequate control of temporary supplementary Artificial Lighting installations
    Building and Environment, 1994
    Co-Authors: A J F Rutten

    Abstract:

    Abstract The energy consumption in Dutch office buildings can be cut considerably if daylight is used as task Lighting. A conservative estimate gives a potential saving of 46% on the electricity costs for Artificial Lighting. The problem of photo-electric control of Artificial Lighting supplementing the daylight illumination and correctly estimating its energy effectiveness, will require a more accurate prediction of the indoor daylight illuminance at points in the working area. An advanced instrument for measuring sky luminance has been built. Analysis of sky-luminance patterns simultaneously with indoor illuminances will give an algorithm for daylight-controlled Artificial Lighting systems.

  • day light controlled Artificial Lighting a potential energy saver right interior light by sky luninance trracking
    , 1991
    Co-Authors: A J F Rutten, Evan Mills

    Abstract:

    The energy consumption in office buildings can considerably be cut, if daylight is used as task Lighting. A conservative estimate – starting from existing knowledge and calculation methods – gives a potential saving of 460 GWh a year or 46 % of the electricity costs for Artificial Lighting in Dutch office buildings, equivalent to 116 million Neth Fl/year or 51 million ECU/year. These substantial amounts justify the implementation of task Lighting by daylight on a larger scale. To more accurately estimate the possible energy conservation by daylight, the designer lacks information on indoor daylight availability in the course of the year. The current way of tuning a daylight-controlled Artificial Lighting installation is too cumbersome and the human appraisal of these installations is still very low. because a daylight-factor-related control algorithm inherently has a very poor accuracy. The problem of comfortable photo-electric control of switched or dimmed Artificial Lighting upplementing the daylight illumination at the work’Place and correctly estimate the energy effectiveness of it, will require new research efforts to find a more accurate. prediction of the indoor daylight illumination level at points of the working area. The research objectives are: (i) for the designer: a frequency distribution of the indoor illuminance by daylight at various points, specified according to latitude, prevailing climate, part of the year, part of the day, and the geometry of the room and the window; (ii) for the Artificial Lighting engineer: an accurate conversion from the daylight environment outside to a control signal for the Artificial Lighting installation. The problem has to be tackled in a phenomenological way: the momentary indoor daylight illumination has to be related to the stochastical varying sky luminance patterns (in the direction of view from the window) by a function with a few measurable parameters. To this end it is necessary to measure and analyze the sky luminance patterns and the simultaneous indoor illuminances. In the running daylight research project of Eindhoven University an advanced sky luminance measuring instrument has been built.

Toyoki Kozai – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Production of Value-Added Transplants in Closed Systems with Artificial Lighting
    Transplant Production in the 21st Century, 2020
    Co-Authors: Toyoki Kozai

    Abstract:

    The use of Artificial light in commercial plant production is most economically favorable when plants are small, so a large number of plants can be simultaneously irradiated by a minimum of Lighting units. Growing closely spaced plants from seeds or cuttings to transplants for field or greenhouse use is a major application of this approach. Transplants increase their economic value when their vegetative or reproductive responses are appropriately regulated by environmental manipulation. Closed transplant production systems with efficient Artificial Lighting are more cost-effective than using natural Lighting alone. These systems can minimize energy and material consumption while, at the same time, optimize photosynthetic and photomorphogenic characteristics. In the future, more transplants will be produced under Artificial light in closed systems. This paper reviews the impact of Artificial Lighting on plant growth and the production of quality transplants in closed systems with Artificial Lighting.

  • Towards sustainable plant factories with Artificial Lighting (PFALs) for achieving SDGs
    International Journal of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, 2019
    Co-Authors: Toyoki Kozai

    Abstract:

    The challenges and opportunities for developing sustainable plant factories with Artificial Lighting (PFALs) are discussed. After examining the production cost and productivity of existing PFALs in Japan, the possibility of introducing a relatively new concept and methodology for considerably improving productivity are discussed in relation to environmental controllability and resource use efficiencies. The fundamental and potential characteristics of ideal or next-generation PFALs (n-PFALs) are then discussed with some suggestions for actualizing n-PFALs. Finally, perspectives of the n-PFALs and technologies to be integrated into the n-PFALs are presented in relation to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to be achieved by 2030.
    Keywords: plant factory with Artificial Lighting (PFAL), productivity, production cost, SDGs
    DOI: 10.25165/j.ijabe.20191205.5177

    Citation: Kozai T. Towards sustainable plant factories with Artificial Lighting (PFALs) for achieving SDGs. Int J Agric & Biol Eng, 2019; 12(5): 28–37.

  • Plant Factories with Artificial Lighting (PFALs): Benefits, Problems, and Challenges
    Smart Plant Factory, 2018
    Co-Authors: Toyoki Kozai

    Abstract:

    The benefits, unsolved problems, and challenges for plant factories with Artificial Lighting (PFALs) are discussed. The remarkable benefits are high resource use efficiency, high annual productivity per unit land area, and production of high-quality plants without using pesticides. Major unsolved problems are high initial investment, electricity cost, and labor cost. A major challenge for the next-generation smart PFAL is the introduction of advanced technologies such as Artificial intelligence with the use of big data, genomics, and phenomics (or methodologies and protocols for noninvasive measurement of plant-specific traits related to plant structure and function).

Taiichi Kobayashi – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • kiwifruit recognition at nighttime using Artificial Lighting based on machine vision
    International Journal of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, 2015
    Co-Authors: Fu Longsheng, Yoshinori Gejima, Cui Yongjie, Su Shuai, Taiichi Kobayashi

    Abstract:

    Most researches involved so far in kiwifruit harvesting robot suggest the scenario of harvesting in daytime for taking advantage of sunlight. A robot operating at nighttime can overcome the problem of low work efficiency and would help to minimize fruit damage. In addition, Artificial lights can be used to ensure constant illumination instead of the variable natural sunlight for image capturing. This paper aims to study the kiwifruit recognition at nighttime using Artificial Lighting based on machine vision. Firstly, an RGB camera was placed underneath the canopy so that clusters of kiwifruits could be included in the images. Next, the images were segmented using an R-G color model. Finally, a group of image processing conventional methods, such as Canny operator were applied to detect the fruits. The image processing results showed that this capturing method could reduce the background noise and overcome any target overlapping. The experimental results showed that the optimal Artificial Lighting ranged approximately between 30-50 lx. The developed algorithm detected 88.3% of the fruits successfully.
    Keywords: Elliptic Hough transform, image capturing method, Kiwifruit, minimal bounding rectangle, optimal illumination intensity
    DOI: 10.3965/j.ijabe.20150804.1576

    Citation: Fu L S, Wang B, Cui Y J, Su S, Gejima Y, Kobayashi T. Kiwifruit recognition at nighttime using Artificial Lighting based on machine vision. Int J Agric & Biol Eng, 2015; 8(4): 52-59.

  • Kiwifruit recognition at nighttime using Artificial Lighting based on machine vision
    International Journal of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, 2015
    Co-Authors: Long Sheng Fu, Bin Wang, Yong Jie Cui, Shuai Su, Yoshinori Gejima, Taiichi Kobayashi

    Abstract:

    Most researches that involved in kiwifruit harvesting robot suggest the scenario of harvesting in daytime for taking advantage of sunlight. A robot operating at nighttime can overcome the problem of low work efficiency and would help to minimize fruit damage. In addition, Artificial lights can be used to ensure constant illumination instead of the variable natural sunlight for image capturing. This paper aims to study the kiwifruit recognition at nighttime using Artificial Lighting based on machine vision. Firstly, an RGB camera was placed underneath the canopy so that clusters of kiwifruits could be included in the images. Next, the images were segmented using an R-G color model. Finally, a group of image processing conventional methods, such as Canny operator were applied to detect the fruits. The image processing results showed that this capturing method could reduce the background noise and overcome any target overlapping. The experimental results showed that the optimal Artificial Lighting ranged approximately between 30-50 lx. The developed algorithm detected 88.3% of the fruits successfully.