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Artificial Selection

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Woori Kwak – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Whole genome sequencing reveals the impact of recent Artificial Selection on red sea bream reared in fish farms.
    Scientific Reports, 2019
    Co-Authors: Bo-hye Nam, Dongahn Yoo, Jung Youn Park, Younhee Shin, Ga-hee Shin, Chan-il Park, Young-ok Kim, Heebal Kim, Woori Kwak

    Abstract:

    Red sea bream, a popular fish resource in Korea and Japan, is being bred in fish farms of the two countries. It is hypothesized that the genomes of red sea bream are influenced by decades of Artificial Selection. This study investigates the impact of Artificial Selection on genomes of red sea bream. Whole genome sequencing was conducted for 40 samples of red sea bream either from Ehime, Nagasaki and Tongyeong fish farms or from the wild. Population stratification based on whole genome data was investigated and the genomic regions of fish farm populations under Selection were identified using XP-EHH and relative nucleotide diversity. Gene ontology analysis revealed that different functions were enriched in different fish farms. In conclusion, this study highlights the difference between independently cultured red sea bream populations by showing that influence of Artificial Selection acted upon completely different genes related to different functions including metabolic and developmental processes.

  • Whole genome sequencing reveals the impact of recent Artificial Selection on red sea bream reared in fish farms
    Scientific Reports, 2019
    Co-Authors: Jung Youn Park, Younhee Shin, Ga-hee Shin, Chan-il Park, Woori Kwak

    Abstract:

    Red sea bream, a popular fish resource in Korea and Japan, is being bred in fish farms of the two countries. It is hypothesized that the genomes of red sea bream are influenced by decades of Artificial Selection. This study investigates the impact of Artificial Selection on genomes of red sea bream. Whole genome sequencing was conducted for 40 samples of red sea bream either from Ehime, Nagasaki and Tongyeong fish farms or from the wild. Population stratification based on whole genome data was investigated and the genomic regions of fish farm populations under Selection were identified using XP-EHH and relative nucleotide diversity. Gene ontology analysis revealed that different functions were enriched in different fish farms. In conclusion, this study highlights the difference between independently cultured red sea bream populations by showing that influence of Artificial Selection acted upon completely different genes related to different functions including metabolic and developmental processes.

Jung Youn Park – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Whole genome sequencing reveals the impact of recent Artificial Selection on red sea bream reared in fish farms.
    Scientific Reports, 2019
    Co-Authors: Bo-hye Nam, Dongahn Yoo, Jung Youn Park, Younhee Shin, Ga-hee Shin, Chan-il Park, Young-ok Kim, Heebal Kim, Woori Kwak

    Abstract:

    Red sea bream, a popular fish resource in Korea and Japan, is being bred in fish farms of the two countries. It is hypothesized that the genomes of red sea bream are influenced by decades of Artificial Selection. This study investigates the impact of Artificial Selection on genomes of red sea bream. Whole genome sequencing was conducted for 40 samples of red sea bream either from Ehime, Nagasaki and Tongyeong fish farms or from the wild. Population stratification based on whole genome data was investigated and the genomic regions of fish farm populations under Selection were identified using XP-EHH and relative nucleotide diversity. Gene ontology analysis revealed that different functions were enriched in different fish farms. In conclusion, this study highlights the difference between independently cultured red sea bream populations by showing that influence of Artificial Selection acted upon completely different genes related to different functions including metabolic and developmental processes.

  • Whole genome sequencing reveals the impact of recent Artificial Selection on red sea bream reared in fish farms
    Scientific Reports, 2019
    Co-Authors: Jung Youn Park, Younhee Shin, Ga-hee Shin, Chan-il Park, Woori Kwak

    Abstract:

    Red sea bream, a popular fish resource in Korea and Japan, is being bred in fish farms of the two countries. It is hypothesized that the genomes of red sea bream are influenced by decades of Artificial Selection. This study investigates the impact of Artificial Selection on genomes of red sea bream. Whole genome sequencing was conducted for 40 samples of red sea bream either from Ehime, Nagasaki and Tongyeong fish farms or from the wild. Population stratification based on whole genome data was investigated and the genomic regions of fish farm populations under Selection were identified using XP-EHH and relative nucleotide diversity. Gene ontology analysis revealed that different functions were enriched in different fish farms. In conclusion, this study highlights the difference between independently cultured red sea bream populations by showing that influence of Artificial Selection acted upon completely different genes related to different functions including metabolic and developmental processes.

Younhee Shin – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Whole genome sequencing reveals the impact of recent Artificial Selection on red sea bream reared in fish farms.
    Scientific Reports, 2019
    Co-Authors: Bo-hye Nam, Dongahn Yoo, Jung Youn Park, Younhee Shin, Ga-hee Shin, Chan-il Park, Young-ok Kim, Heebal Kim, Woori Kwak

    Abstract:

    Red sea bream, a popular fish resource in Korea and Japan, is being bred in fish farms of the two countries. It is hypothesized that the genomes of red sea bream are influenced by decades of Artificial Selection. This study investigates the impact of Artificial Selection on genomes of red sea bream. Whole genome sequencing was conducted for 40 samples of red sea bream either from Ehime, Nagasaki and Tongyeong fish farms or from the wild. Population stratification based on whole genome data was investigated and the genomic regions of fish farm populations under Selection were identified using XP-EHH and relative nucleotide diversity. Gene ontology analysis revealed that different functions were enriched in different fish farms. In conclusion, this study highlights the difference between independently cultured red sea bream populations by showing that influence of Artificial Selection acted upon completely different genes related to different functions including metabolic and developmental processes.

  • Whole genome sequencing reveals the impact of recent Artificial Selection on red sea bream reared in fish farms
    Scientific Reports, 2019
    Co-Authors: Jung Youn Park, Younhee Shin, Ga-hee Shin, Chan-il Park, Woori Kwak

    Abstract:

    Red sea bream, a popular fish resource in Korea and Japan, is being bred in fish farms of the two countries. It is hypothesized that the genomes of red sea bream are influenced by decades of Artificial Selection. This study investigates the impact of Artificial Selection on genomes of red sea bream. Whole genome sequencing was conducted for 40 samples of red sea bream either from Ehime, Nagasaki and Tongyeong fish farms or from the wild. Population stratification based on whole genome data was investigated and the genomic regions of fish farm populations under Selection were identified using XP-EHH and relative nucleotide diversity. Gene ontology analysis revealed that different functions were enriched in different fish farms. In conclusion, this study highlights the difference between independently cultured red sea bream populations by showing that influence of Artificial Selection acted upon completely different genes related to different functions including metabolic and developmental processes.