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Assessment Phase

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Nyanda Mcbride – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The Assessment Phase of the Intervention Research Framework: Study Design
    Intervention Research, 2016
    Co-Authors: Nyanda Mcbride

    Abstract:

    This chapter is the first of four chapters providing details about the Assessment Phase of the Intervention Research Framework. This chapter provides information about the three distinct types of longitudinal behavioural Assessment that contributes to proof of evidence: efficacy; effectiveness, and efficiency research. This chapter also considered the elements of research design that are required for a well-designed and rigorously conducted research study. These elements include: the composition of the study team; the components of a high quality study design with particular emphasis on: statement of hypotheses and objectives; the inclusion of a control group; the development of a study analysis plan; considerations around validity and reliability; various forms of bias which threaten the viability of a study; ethical considerations associated with intervention research particularly in schools; and costs associated with intervention research. This chapter also provides a summary of the costs associated with the SHAHRP study, and outlines the limitations (or potential areas of bias) in the SHAHRP study.

  • The Assessment Phase of the Intervention Research Framework: Recruitment of a Study Sample
    Intervention Research, 2016
    Co-Authors: Nyanda Mcbride

    Abstract:

    Chapter nine is the third of four chapters providing details about the Assessment Phase of the Intervention Research Framework. This chapter focuses on the recruitment of a study sample. Consideration is given to the difference stratus of recruitment in the school setting including the system, district and school levels. Interaction with school level gatekeepers, other staff, parents and students is discussed. Factors that support the research process in schools are detailed including: contact of agreement, school-based research coordinator, timing, student absenteeism and planning for change. No specific SHAHRP examples are provided at the end of this chapter as lessons learn from the SHAHRP and other school-based intervention research studies are incorporated within the text of the chapter.

  • The Assessment Phase of the Intervention Research Framework: Selecting a Study Sample
    Intervention Research, 2016
    Co-Authors: Nyanda Mcbride

    Abstract:

    This chapter is the second of four providing details about the Assessment Phase of the Intervention Research Framework. This chapter provides details of how to describe the study population with enough detail to be meaningful to readers of the research. This chapter also details the importance and methods of selecting a study sample that is representative of the target population and therefore generalizable to the target group. Issues discussed in this chapter include: methods of selecting a random sample including a simple random sample, a systematic random sample, cluster and stratified sample, and how to use power calculations to determine sample size. Other issues discussed in this chapter include methods for random selection and allocation, and reducing non-respondent rate. A summary of the SHAHRP study sample is provided noting the study sample, inclusion and exclusion criteria, and attrition.

Chris Albery – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Characterization of Vertical Impact Device Acceleration Pulses Using Parametric Assessment: Phase IV Dual Impact Pulses
    , 2017
    Co-Authors: Chris E. Perry, Rachael Christopher, Chris Burneka, Ben Steinhauer, Chris Albery

    Abstract:

    Abstract : The Aircrew Biodynamics and Protection (ABP) Team of AFRL (711 HPW/RHCPT) and their in-house technical support contractor, Infoscitex, conducted a series of tests to identify the performance capabilities of the Vertical Impact Device (VID) and the Warrior Injury Assessment Manikin (WIAMan) seat. Phase IV was conducted to continue research of the facilitys performance capabilities based on specific seat configurations. The experimental design, consisting of four different seat configurations with a restrained manikin, was evaluated in four different test series. The results provided in this report will be used as a reference for future test applications performed within the 711 HPW, as a benchmark for post-refurbishment and post-maintenance performance verification, and to potentially determine the degree of participation in the Armys WIAMan development program. This test Phase was the fourth of multiple Phases and focused on the effects the facilitys new seat fixture had on the acceleration pulse and calculated velocity change at different locations on the seat structure. Two different WIAMan seat configurations were tested with a restrained manikin in each configuration.

  • Characterization of Vertical Impact Device Acceleration Pulses Using Parametric Assessment: Phase 3, WIAMan Seat
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Chris Perry, Chris Burneka, Rachael Christopher, Chris Albery

    Abstract:

    Abstract : Phase III of a research effort using the Vertical Impact Device (VID) located in Bldg 824, Wright-Patterson AFB OH., was conducted to continue research of the facilitys performance capabilities. The initial performance requirements for the VID to support the WIAMan program were impact acceleration pulses over 300 G with pulse time-to-peak values in the 5 to 10 ms range, and maximum velocity changes of greater than 32 ft/s or 9.8 m/s (Phase I), and this was followed by a new requirement to exceed 10 m/s (Phase II). Additional program requirements were then defined to produce velocity changes from 13 to 20 ft/s, approximately 4 6 m/s, with a time-to-peak velocity change of 5 ms to 10ms as input to a test seat, which became the focus of Phase III. The Phase III test program objectives were to determine the VID pulse characteristics using two specially designed seat fixtures and associated restrained manikins that differed in total weight on the VID carriage. The experimental design consisted of two different seat configurations with a restrained manikin in each configuration. One configuration consisted of a seat structure and a 50 Hybrid III male manikin (159 lb) with a total test weight of 309 lb, and was referred to as the WS1 configuration. The second seat configuration consisted of a seat structure and a GARD manikin (190 lb) with a total test weight of 807 lb, and was referred to as the WS2 configuration. Each seat was tested at different drop heights and using different VID carriage felt attenuators. Test data indicated that the felt attenuators had a greater influence on the carriage acceleration and time-to-peak velocity than the total weight added to the VID carriage. The testing with the WS1 and WS2 set-up showed that the VID facility with either weight configuration produced overall velocity changes and time-to-peak velocity changes with the limits established by the WIAMan program.

  • Characterization of Vertical Impact Device Acceleration Pulses Using Parametric Assessment: Phase I
    , 2015
    Co-Authors: Chris Perry, Chris Burneka, Rachael Christopher, Chris Albery

    Abstract:

    Abstract : The research effort was conducted to identify the performance capabilities of the Vertical Impact Device (VID) test located in Bldg 824, Wright Patterson AFB OH. The performance requirements for the VID were required to support the Warrior Injury Assessment Manikin (WIAMan) program. The test program approach used a parametric analysis with the objective to define and evaluate the performance effect of various impact attenuators on VID impact acceleration. Over 100 impact tests were completed and consisted of varying the energy attenuators, defined as the high-density (red) urethane programmers and industrial felt of varying density and thickness, while progressively increasing the drop height of the VID’s drop table. One red urethane programmer, 4 felt densities, and 4 felt thicknesses were evaluated, and were used as the basis to separate the data analysis into three sub-Phases. The measured response was the acceleration recorded on the VID drop carriage, and the calculated velocity change and TTP velocity change. The first Phase of the Assessment evaluated the VID’s red urethane programmers on the drop carriage at 8 different drop heights that ranged from 5 to 50 inches. The acceleration pulse width was used as an estimator of the time-to-peak velocity. The second Phase of testing indicated that the felt density variation had a minimal effect on the peak acceleration or velocity change at two drop heights, and was shown by calculating a percent difference in the response relative to a baseline which was the least dense felt. The third Phase of testing indicated that the felt thickness variation had a very little effect on the velocity change at the two drop heights, but had a large effect on the peak acceleration and the acceleration pulse width at the two drop heights. This was shown by calculating a percent difference in the response relative to a baseline which was the least thick felt.

Unep Evaluation Office – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Terminal Evaluation of the UNEP/GEF Project: Technology Needs Assessment Phase II
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Unep Evaluation Office

    Abstract:

    This report is a Terminal Evaluation of the UNEP/GEF project ‘Technology Needs Assessment Phase II’ implemented between 2014 and 2018.The project’s overall development goal was to provide targeted financial and technical support to self-selecting developing countries to carry out Technology Needs Assessments (TNAs) and develop national Technology Action Plans (TAPs) for prioritized technologies that reduce GHG emissions, support adaptation to climate, and are consistent with national sustainable development goals. The evaluation sought to assess project performance (in terms of relevance, effectiveness and efficiency), and determine outcomes and impacts (actual and potential) stemming from the project, including their sustainability. The evaluation has two primary purposes: (i) to provide evidence of results to meet accountability requirements, and (ii) to promote learning, feedback, and knowledge sharing through results and lessons learned among UNEP, and the relevant agencies of the project participating countries.

  • Terminal Evaluation of the project: UNEP/GEF Project – Technology Needs Assessment Phase 1
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Unep Evaluation Office

    Abstract:

    The purpose of the Technology Needs Assessment Project (Phase I), supported by the Global Environment Fund (GEF), was to assist participating “developing country parties to identify and analyse priority technology needs, which can form the basis for a portfolio of environmentally sound technology (EST) projects and programmes to facilitate the transfer of, and access to, the technologies and related know-how”. This is an obligation under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The project provide support to 36 countries. This terminal evaluation was undertaken primarily during the fourth quarter of 2015. It focused on the two principal purposes specified by UNEP – meeting accountability requirements; and the promotion of learning and knowledge sharing and lessons within UNEP and among partners.