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Assistive Technologies

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Priya Narasimhan – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • smartphone based Assistive Technologies for the blind
    Compilers Architecture and Synthesis for Embedded Systems, 2009
    Co-Authors: Priya Narasimhan, Rajeev Gandhi, Dan Rossi

    Abstract:

    This paper describes our experiences with developing cost-effective Assistive Technologies for the visually impaired, with a focus on using commercial off-the-shelf Technologies as much as possible. Trinetra involves three specific Technologies–the grocery shopping assistant, the currency identifier and the transportation assistant–all supported on standard mobile phones with text-to-speech, commonly used by the visually impaired.

  • Trinetra: Assistive Technologies for Grocery Shopping for the Blind
    2006 10th IEEE International Symposium on Wearable Computers, 2006
    Co-Authors: Patrick E. Lanigan, Aaron M. Paulos, Andrew W. Williams, Dan Rossi, Priya Narasimhan

    Abstract:

    Trinetra aims for cost-effective, Assistive Technologies to provide an independent grocery-shopping experience for the blind by leveraging barcodes and networking diverse embedded COTS devices.

  • trinetra Assistive Technologies for the blind
    , 2006
    Co-Authors: Patrick E. Lanigan, Aaron M. Paulos, Andrew W. Williams, Priya Narasimhan

    Abstract:

    Trinetra aims for cost-effective, Assistive Technologies to provide blind people with a greater degree of independence in their daily activities. The overall objective is to improve the quality of life for the blind by harnessing the collective capability of diverse networked embedded devices to support grocery shopping, transportation, etc. This paper describes our research and development of the Trinetra system, a barcode-based solution comprising COTS components, such as an Internetand Bluetooth-enabled cell phone, text-to-speech software and a portable barcode reader. We describe our experiences with the first deployment of Trinetra at the Carnegie Mellon University’s campus store, Entropy.

Patrick E. Lanigan – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Trinetra: Assistive Technologies for Grocery Shopping for the Blind
    2006 10th IEEE International Symposium on Wearable Computers, 2006
    Co-Authors: Patrick E. Lanigan, Aaron M. Paulos, Andrew W. Williams, Dan Rossi, Priya Narasimhan

    Abstract:

    Trinetra aims for cost-effective, Assistive Technologies to provide an independent grocery-shopping experience for the blind by leveraging barcodes and networking diverse embedded COTS devices.

  • trinetra Assistive Technologies for the blind
    , 2006
    Co-Authors: Patrick E. Lanigan, Aaron M. Paulos, Andrew W. Williams, Priya Narasimhan

    Abstract:

    Trinetra aims for cost-effective, Assistive Technologies to provide blind people with a greater degree of independence in their daily activities. The overall objective is to improve the quality of life for the blind by harnessing the collective capability of diverse networked embedded devices to support grocery shopping, transportation, etc. This paper describes our research and development of the Trinetra system, a barcode-based solution comprising COTS components, such as an Internetand Bluetooth-enabled cell phone, text-to-speech software and a portable barcode reader. We describe our experiences with the first deployment of Trinetra at the Carnegie Mellon University’s campus store, Entropy.

Hannah Bartlett – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • mobile Assistive Technologies for the visually impaired
    Survey of Ophthalmology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Lilit Hakobyan, Jo Lumsden, Dympna Osullivan, Hannah Bartlett

    Abstract:

    There are around 285 million visually impaired people worldwide, and around 370,000 people are registered as blind or partially sighted in the UK. Ongoing advances in information technology (IT) are increasing the scope for IT-based mobile Assistive Technologies to facilitate the independence, safety, and improved quality of life of the visually impaired. Research is being directed at making mobile phones and other handheld devices accessible via our haptic (touch) and audio sensory channels. We review research and innovation within the field of mobile Assistive technology for the visually impaired and, in so doing, highlight the need for successful collaboration between clinical expertise, computer science, and domain users to realize fully the potential benefits of such Technologies. We initially reflect on research that has been conducted to make mobile phones more accessible to people with vision loss. We then discuss innovative Assistive applications designed for the visually impaired that are either delivered via mainstream devices and can be used while in motion (e.g., mobile phones) or are embedded within an environment that may be in motion (e.g., public transport) or within which the user may be in motion (e.g., smart homes).