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Assistive Technology

The Experts below are selected from a list of 30435 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

N Groce – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Assistive Technology and people a position paper from the first global research innovation and education on Assistive Technology great summit
    Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Deirdre Desmond, Johan Borg, Natasha Layton, Jacob A Bentley, F H Boot, Bishnu Maya Dhungana, Pamela Gallagher, Lynn Gitlow, Rosemary Joan Gowran, N Groce

    Abstract:

    Assistive Technology (AT) is a powerful enabler of participation. The World Health Organization’s Global Collaboration on Assistive Technology (GATE) programme is actively working towards access to Assistive Technology for all. Developed through collaborative work as a part of the Global Research, Innovation and Education on Assistive Technology (GREAT) Summit, this position paper provides a “state of the science” view of AT users, conceptualized as “People” within the set of GATE strategic “P”s. People are at the core of policy, products, personnel and provision. AT is an interface between the person and the life they would like to lead. People’s preferences, perspectives and goals are fundamental to defining and determining the success of AT. Maximizing the impact of AT in enabling participation requires an individualized and holistic understanding of the value and meaning of AT for the individual, taking a universal model perspective, focusing on the person, in context, and then considering the condition and/or the Technology. This paper aims to situate and emphasize people at the centre of AT systems: we highlight personal meanings and perspectives on AT use and consider the role of advocacy, empowerment and co-design in developing and driving AT processes.

Deirdre Desmond – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Assistive Technology and people a position paper from the first global research innovation and education on Assistive Technology great summit
    Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Deirdre Desmond, Johan Borg, Natasha Layton, Jacob A Bentley, F H Boot, Bishnu Maya Dhungana, Pamela Gallagher, Lynn Gitlow, Rosemary Joan Gowran, N Groce

    Abstract:

    Assistive Technology (AT) is a powerful enabler of participation. The World Health Organization’s Global Collaboration on Assistive Technology (GATE) programme is actively working towards access to Assistive Technology for all. Developed through collaborative work as a part of the Global Research, Innovation and Education on Assistive Technology (GREAT) Summit, this position paper provides a “state of the science” view of AT users, conceptualized as “People” within the set of GATE strategic “P”s. People are at the core of policy, products, personnel and provision. AT is an interface between the person and the life they would like to lead. People’s preferences, perspectives and goals are fundamental to defining and determining the success of AT. Maximizing the impact of AT in enabling participation requires an individualized and holistic understanding of the value and meaning of AT for the individual, taking a universal model perspective, focusing on the person, in context, and then considering the condition and/or the Technology. This paper aims to situate and emphasize people at the centre of AT systems: we highlight personal meanings and perspectives on AT use and consider the role of advocacy, empowerment and co-design in developing and driving AT processes.

Marcus J. Fuhrer – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Caregivers’ experiences with the selection and use of Assistive Technology.
    Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 2017
    Co-Authors: W. Ben Mortenson, Alex Pysklywec, Marcus J. Fuhrer, Jeffrey Jutai, Michelle Plante, Louise Demers

    Abstract:

    Qualitative data from a mixed-methods clinical trial are used to examine caregivers’ experiences with the selection and use of Assistive Technology to facilitate care recipients’ independence. Through a thematic analysis of interviews from 27 caregivers, three broad themes were identified. “A partial peace of mind” described the generally positive psychological impacts from Assistive Technology, mainly reduced stress and a shift in caregiving labour from physical tasks to a monitoring role. “Working together” explored the caregivers’ experiences of receiving Assistive Technology and the sense of collaboration felt by caregivers during the intervention process. Finally, “Overcoming barriers“ addressed two impediments to accessing Assistive Technology: lack of funding and appointment wait times for service providers. The findings suggest that Assistive Technology provision by prescribers plays a beneficial role in the lives of caregivers, but access to such benefits can be hampered by contextual con…

  • Assistive Technology outcomes research challenges met and yet unmet
    American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, 2001
    Co-Authors: Marcus J. Fuhrer

    Abstract:

    Fuhrer MJ: Assistive Technology outcomes research: Challenges met and yet unmet. J Am Phys Med Rehabil 2001;80:528–535. This article highlights the special requirements, achievements, and yet unmet challenges of assessing the outcomes of Assistive Technology services. The current status of this research is considered from the standpoint of developmental stages that seem to characterize many areas of outcomes research. Those stages include exhortation, sober appraisal, infrastructure building, and “getting on with it.” The status of measuring Assistive Technology outcomes is described, and efforts to develop new measures are critically reviewed. Three as yet unmet challenges are discussed that are faced alike by Assistive Technology outcomes research and by rehabilitation outcomes research in general. They are as follows: (1) operationalizing a multiple-stakeholder approach to outcomes research; (2) formulating adequate treatment theories; and (3) creating shared databases.