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Astronomical Observatories

The Experts below are selected from a list of 324 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Sean C Casey – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • the sofia program astronomers return to the stratosphere
    Proceedings of SPIE, 2006
    Co-Authors: Sean C Casey

    Abstract:

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is the next generation of airborne Astronomical Observatories. Funded by the U.S. and German space agencies, SOFIA is scheduled for science flights beginning in late-2008. The observatory consists of a 747-SP modified to accommodate a 2.7-meter telescope with an open port design. Academic and government laboratories spanning both the U.S. and Germany are developing science instruments for SOFIA. Using state-of-the-art technologies, SOFIA will explore the emission of Astronomical sources with an unprecedented level of angular resolution (θ[arc-seconds] = 0.1 x wavelength [μm]) and spectral line sensitivity at infrared and sub-millimeter wavelengths. The current status of SOFIA is available from the observatory web site at http://sofia.arc.nasa.gov/ and is updated frequently.

  • the sofia program astronomers return to the stratosphere
    Advances in Space Research, 2004
    Co-Authors: Sean C Casey

    Abstract:

    Abstract The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is the next generation of airborne Astronomical Observatories. Funded by the US and German space agencies, SOFIA is scheduled for science flights beginning in late 2005. The observatory consists of a 747-SP modified to accommodate a 2.7-m telescope with an open port design. Academic and government laboratories spanning both the US and Germany are developing science instruments for SOFIA. Using state-of-the-art technologies, SOFIA will explore the emission of Astronomical sources with an unprecedented level of angular resolution ( θ [arc-sec]=0.1 × wavelength [μm]) and spectral line sensitivity at infrared and sub-millimeter wavelengths. The current status of SOFIA is available from the observatory web site at http://sofia.arc.nasa.gov and is updated frequently.

William L Bradford – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • improved upper winds models for several Astronomical Observatories
    Optics Express, 2011
    Co-Authors: Lewis C Roberts, William L Bradford

    Abstract:

    An understanding of wind speed and direction as a function of height are critical to the proper modeling of atmospheric turbulence. We have used radiosonde data from launch sites near significant Astronomical Observatories and created mean profiles of wind speed and direction and have also computed Richardson number profiles. Using data from the last 30 years, we extend the 1977 Greenwood wind profile to include parameters that show seasonal variations and differences in location. The added information from our models is useful for the design of adaptive optics systems and other imaging systems. Our analysis of the Richardson number suggests that persistent turbulent layers may be inferred when low values are present in our long term averaged data. Knowledge of the presence of these layers may help with planning for adaptive optics and laser communications.

  • improved models of upper level wind for several Astronomical Observatories
    arXiv: Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics, 2010
    Co-Authors: Lewis C Roberts, William L Bradford

    Abstract:

    An understanding of wind speed and direction as a function of height are critical to the proper modeling of atmospheric turbulence. We have used radiosonde data from launch sites near significant Astronomical Observatories and created mean profiles of wind speed and direction and have also computed Richardson number profiles. Using data from the last 30 years, we extend the 1977 Greenwood wind profile to include parameters that show seasonal variations and differences in location. The added information from our models is useful for the design of adaptive optics systems and other imaging systems. Our analysis of the Richardson number suggests that persistent turbulent layers may be inferred when low values are present in our long term averaged data. Knowledge of the presence of these layers may help with planning for adaptive optics and laser communications.

Lewis C Roberts – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • improved upper winds models for several Astronomical Observatories
    Optics Express, 2011
    Co-Authors: Lewis C Roberts, William L Bradford

    Abstract:

    An understanding of wind speed and direction as a function of height are critical to the proper modeling of atmospheric turbulence. We have used radiosonde data from launch sites near significant Astronomical Observatories and created mean profiles of wind speed and direction and have also computed Richardson number profiles. Using data from the last 30 years, we extend the 1977 Greenwood wind profile to include parameters that show seasonal variations and differences in location. The added information from our models is useful for the design of adaptive optics systems and other imaging systems. Our analysis of the Richardson number suggests that persistent turbulent layers may be inferred when low values are present in our long term averaged data. Knowledge of the presence of these layers may help with planning for adaptive optics and laser communications.

  • improved models of upper level wind for several Astronomical Observatories
    arXiv: Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics, 2010
    Co-Authors: Lewis C Roberts, William L Bradford

    Abstract:

    An understanding of wind speed and direction as a function of height are critical to the proper modeling of atmospheric turbulence. We have used radiosonde data from launch sites near significant Astronomical Observatories and created mean profiles of wind speed and direction and have also computed Richardson number profiles. Using data from the last 30 years, we extend the 1977 Greenwood wind profile to include parameters that show seasonal variations and differences in location. The added information from our models is useful for the design of adaptive optics systems and other imaging systems. Our analysis of the Richardson number suggests that persistent turbulent layers may be inferred when low values are present in our long term averaged data. Knowledge of the presence of these layers may help with planning for adaptive optics and laser communications.