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Almudena Arcones – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • white paper on nuclear Astrophysics and low energy nuclear physics part 1 nuclear Astrophysics
    Progress in Particle and Nuclear Physics, 2017
    Co-Authors: Almudena Arcones, D W Bardayan, Timothy C Beers, L A Bernstein, J C Blackmon, Bronson Messer, Alex B Brown, Edward F Brown
    Abstract:

    Abstract This white paper informs the nuclear Astrophysics community and funding agencies about the scientific directions and priorities of the field and provides input from this community for the 2015 Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It summarizes the outcome of the nuclear Astrophysics town meeting that was held on August 21–23, 2014 in College Station at the campus of Texas A&M University in preparation of the NSAC Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It also reflects the outcome of an earlier town meeting of the nuclear Astrophysics community organized by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) on October 9–10, 2012 Detroit, Michigan, with the purpose of developing a vision for nuclear Astrophysics in light of the recent NRC decadal surveys in nuclear physics (NP2010) and astronomy (ASTRO2010). The white paper is furthermore informed by the town meeting of the Association of Research at University Nuclear Accelerators (ARUNA) that took place at the University of Notre Dame on June 12–13, 2014. In summary we find that nuclear Astrophysics is a modern and vibrant field addressing fundamental science questions at the intersection of nuclear physics and Astrophysics. These questions relate to the origin of the elements, the nuclear engines that drive life and death of stars, and the properties of dense matter. A broad range of nuclear accelerator facilities, astronomical observatories, theory efforts, and computational capabilities are needed. With the developments outlined in this white paper, answers to long standing key questions are well within reach in the coming decade.

  • White Paper on Nuclear Astrophysics
    arXiv: Solar and Stellar Astrophysics, 2016
    Co-Authors: Almudena Arcones, Edward F Brown, D W Bardayan, Timothy C Beers, J C Blackmon, Bronson Messer, Lee A. Berstein, B. Alex Brown, Carl R. Brune, Arthur E Champagne
    Abstract:

    This white paper informs the nuclear Astrophysics community and funding agencies about the scientific directions and priorities of the field and provides input from this community for the 2015 Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It summarizes the outcome of the nuclear Astrophysics town meeting that was held on August 21-23, 2014 in College Station at the campus of Texas A&M University in preparation of the NSAC Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It also reflects the outcome of an earlier town meeting of the nuclear Astrophysics community organized by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) on October 9- 10, 2012 Detroit, Michigan, with the purpose of developing a vision for nuclear Astrophysics in light of the recent NRC decadal surveys in nuclear physics (NP2010) and astronomy (ASTRO2010). The white paper is furthermore informed by the town meeting of the Association of Research at University Nuclear Accelerators (ARUNA) that took place at the University of Notre Dame on June 12-13, 2014. In summary we find that nuclear Astrophysics is a modern and vibrant field addressing fundamental science questions at the intersection of nuclear physics and Astrophysics. These questions relate to the origin of the elements, the nuclear engines that drive life and death of stars, and the properties of dense matter. A broad range of nuclear accelerator facilities, astronomical observatories, theory efforts, and computational capabilities are needed. With the developments outlined in this white paper, answers to long standing key questions are well within reach in the coming decade.

Charling Tao – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics and the Dark Universe
    , 2014
    Co-Authors: Charling Tao
    Abstract:

    The Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics (THCA) was founded in 2001 by Prof. Li Tipei and Shang Rencheng. A distinguishing characteristic of THCA’s Astrophysics program is its emphasis on space X-ray and gamma-ray instrumentation, by taking advantage of Tsinghua’s strong programs on nuclear physics, nuclear engineering, space and aeronautics engineering, as well as electronics and information technology. The main research directions in THCA include high energy Astrophysics and cosmology with space and ground observations in X-rays and gamma-rays, and more recently in optical wavelengths, radio-astronomy, gravitational waves, dark matter and dark energy analyses and projects.

  • Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics and the Dark Universe
    Towards Ultimate Understanding of the Universe, 2013
    Co-Authors: Charling Tao
    Abstract:

    The Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics (THCA) was founded in 2001 by Prof. Li Tipei and Shang Rencheng. A distinguishing characteristic of THCA’s Astrophysics program is its emphasis on space X-ray and gamma-ray instrumentation, by taking advantage of Tsinghua’s strong programs on nuclear physics, nuclear engineering, space and aeronautics engineering, as well as electronics and information technology. The main research directions in THCA include high energy Astrophysics and cosmology with space and ground observations in X-rays and gamma-rays, and more recently in optical wavelengths, radio-astronomy, gravitational waves, dark matter and dark energy analyses and projects. The first years of THCA activities have been detailed in Prof. Zhang Shuang Nan’s presentation1 at COSPA in 2009. For details, please also refer to the Center website: http:// www.thca.tsinghua.edu.cn/en. The following sections describe the activities in which we are involved with our students, postdocs and collaborators. We have entered an era of multi-probes and multiwavelengths databases and analysis, which explains why we need to be involved and have access to not only one project, but many complementary ones in order to understand the physics of astronomical objects, and the evolution of the universe better. Our activities cover a wide variety of topics and techniques, although not all aspects of Astrophysics. Astrophysics and cosmology are offering a rich domain for discoveries: not only new celestial objects but also and maybe more importantly (at least for the physicist I am) fundamental physics questions. Teaching science through astronomy, Astrophysics and cosmology is a pleasure, and is rewarding. Students in Tsinghua are enthusiastic and challenging. We are a small center, with only a few people so far, but Tsinghua University leadership has promised to help with the development of Astrophysics and cosmology.

  • Introduction for the discipline of Astrophysics at Tsinghua University
    SCIENTIA SINICA Physica Mechanica & Astronomica, 2011
    Co-Authors: Charling Tao
    Abstract:

    The present paper introduces briefly the historical development of astronomy at Tsinghua University and the present status of the Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics (THCA), its main research areas and related achievements. Besides training of excellent students, research areas include: hard X-ray modulation telescope (HXMT) based on satellite, high energy Astrophysics, astronomical observation and study at optical wavelength, cosmology, data analysis of gravitational wave measuring experiment and theoretical Astrophysics study.

Hideaki Takabe – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Astrophysics with Intense and Ultra-Intense Lasers “Laser Astrophysics
    Progress of Theoretical Physics Supplement, 2001
    Co-Authors: Hideaki Takabe
    Abstract:

    I review the present status of laser Astrophysics research in which the intense andultraintense lasers are used to study basic data of hot-dense plasmas, violent phenomena such as explosion scaled down in laboratory with appropriate similarity law, and advanced physics such as anti-matter plasmas. The author’s original discipline, laser fusion, requires studying the physics of high-energy density (HED) plasmas. Modern Astrophysics also needs the maturity of HED physics. I briefly review the physics scenario of laser fusion and divide it to six subjects. They are (1) Laser plasma interaction, (2) Electron energy transport, (3) Hydrodynamics and strong shocks, (4) Hydrodynamic instability, (5) Atomic physics andX-ray transport, and(6) Laser-prod ucedrelativistic plasmas. The author proposed to introduce three views to consider and pick up model experiments suggested from each topics in laser fusion. They are (1) Sameness, (2) Similarity, and(3) Resemblance. The matrix made of six rows of the subjects of laser fusion and three columns of three views gave us at the present time fifteen subjects of laser Astrophysics. These fifteen topics include, for example, the equation of state andopacity of the hot-d ense plasmas, topics relatedto supernova explosions, andrelativistic electron-positron plasma jets seen in active galactic nuclei. The detailed explanation on astrophysical interest and possible model experiments for each topics is given in the present paper. I hope that this paper will motivate the readers to think andfinda variety of new topics andthe matrix table becomes black with many new

  • Astrophysics with intense lasers
    Applications of High Field and Short Wavelength Sources VIII, 1999
    Co-Authors: Hideaki Takabe
    Abstract:

    Intense lasers can be used to study Astrophysics, mainly relating to the evolution of stars. After a brief survey of recent topics in Astrophysics, theoretical and experimental activities of intense laser Astrophysics will be presented.

Edward F Brown – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • white paper on nuclear Astrophysics and low energy nuclear physics part 1 nuclear Astrophysics
    Progress in Particle and Nuclear Physics, 2017
    Co-Authors: Almudena Arcones, D W Bardayan, Timothy C Beers, L A Bernstein, J C Blackmon, Bronson Messer, Alex B Brown, Edward F Brown
    Abstract:

    Abstract This white paper informs the nuclear Astrophysics community and funding agencies about the scientific directions and priorities of the field and provides input from this community for the 2015 Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It summarizes the outcome of the nuclear Astrophysics town meeting that was held on August 21–23, 2014 in College Station at the campus of Texas A&M University in preparation of the NSAC Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It also reflects the outcome of an earlier town meeting of the nuclear Astrophysics community organized by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) on October 9–10, 2012 Detroit, Michigan, with the purpose of developing a vision for nuclear Astrophysics in light of the recent NRC decadal surveys in nuclear physics (NP2010) and astronomy (ASTRO2010). The white paper is furthermore informed by the town meeting of the Association of Research at University Nuclear Accelerators (ARUNA) that took place at the University of Notre Dame on June 12–13, 2014. In summary we find that nuclear Astrophysics is a modern and vibrant field addressing fundamental science questions at the intersection of nuclear physics and Astrophysics. These questions relate to the origin of the elements, the nuclear engines that drive life and death of stars, and the properties of dense matter. A broad range of nuclear accelerator facilities, astronomical observatories, theory efforts, and computational capabilities are needed. With the developments outlined in this white paper, answers to long standing key questions are well within reach in the coming decade.

  • White Paper on Nuclear Astrophysics
    arXiv: Solar and Stellar Astrophysics, 2016
    Co-Authors: Almudena Arcones, Edward F Brown, D W Bardayan, Timothy C Beers, J C Blackmon, Bronson Messer, Lee A. Berstein, B. Alex Brown, Carl R. Brune, Arthur E Champagne
    Abstract:

    This white paper informs the nuclear Astrophysics community and funding agencies about the scientific directions and priorities of the field and provides input from this community for the 2015 Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It summarizes the outcome of the nuclear Astrophysics town meeting that was held on August 21-23, 2014 in College Station at the campus of Texas A&M University in preparation of the NSAC Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It also reflects the outcome of an earlier town meeting of the nuclear Astrophysics community organized by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) on October 9- 10, 2012 Detroit, Michigan, with the purpose of developing a vision for nuclear Astrophysics in light of the recent NRC decadal surveys in nuclear physics (NP2010) and astronomy (ASTRO2010). The white paper is furthermore informed by the town meeting of the Association of Research at University Nuclear Accelerators (ARUNA) that took place at the University of Notre Dame on June 12-13, 2014. In summary we find that nuclear Astrophysics is a modern and vibrant field addressing fundamental science questions at the intersection of nuclear physics and Astrophysics. These questions relate to the origin of the elements, the nuclear engines that drive life and death of stars, and the properties of dense matter. A broad range of nuclear accelerator facilities, astronomical observatories, theory efforts, and computational capabilities are needed. With the developments outlined in this white paper, answers to long standing key questions are well within reach in the coming decade.

Farid Salama – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The Future of Laboratory Astrophysics
    Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union, 2019
    Co-Authors: Farid Salama
    Abstract:

    AbstractA Round Table discussion on the future of Laboratory Astrophysics and the role of IAU Commission B5 was held on the fourth day of the conference to discuss how the IAU Laboratory Astrophysics Commission (B5) can best support the astronomy community and help promote laboratory Astrophysics.

  • Proceedings of the NASA Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop
    , 2013
    Co-Authors: Farid Salama
    Abstract:

    This report is a collection of papers presented at the 2006 NASA Workshop on Laboratory Astrophysics held in the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) from February 14 to 16, 2006. This workshop brings together producers and users of laboratory Astrophysics data so that they can understand each other’s needs and limitations in the context of the needs for NASA‘s missions. The last NASA-sponsored workshop was held in 2002 at Ames Research Center. Recent related meetings include the Topical Session at the AAS meeting and the European workshop at Pillnitz, Germany, both of which were held in June 2005. The former showcased the importance of laboratory Astrophysics to the community at large, while the European workshop highlighted a multi-laboratory approach to providing the needed data. The 2006 NASA Workshop on Laboratory Astrophysics, sponsored by the NASA Astrophysics Division, focused on the current status of the field and its relevance to NASA. This workshop attracted 105 participants and 82 papers of which 19 were invited. A White Paper identifying the key issues in laboratory Astrophysics during the break-out sessions was prepared by the Scientific Organizing Committee, and has been forwarded to the Universe Working Group (UWG) at NASA Headquarters. This White Paper, which represented the collective inputs and opinions from experts and stakeholders in the field of Astrophysics, should serve as the working document for the future development of NASA‘s R&A program in laboratory Astrophysics.

  • Laboratory Astrophysics Division of the AAS (LAD)
    , 2012
    Co-Authors: Farid Salama, Wick Haxton, Steve Federman, R. P. Drake, Daniel Wolf Savin
    Abstract:

    The purpose of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) is to advance our understanding of the Universe through the promotion of fundamental theoretical and experimental research into the underlying processes that drive the Cosmos. LAD represents all areas of Astrophysics and planetary sciences. The first new AAS Division in more than 30 years, the LAD traces its history back to the recommendation from the scientific community via the White Paper from the 2006 NASA-sponsored Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop. This recommendation was endorsed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC), which advises the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on selected issues within the fields of astronomy and Astrophysics that are of mutual interest and concern to the agencies. In January 2007, at the 209th AAS meeting, the AAS Council set up a Steering Committee to formulate Bylaws for a Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA). The AAS Council formally established the WGLA with a five-year mandate in May 2007, at the 210th AAS meeting. From 2008 through 2012, the WGLA annually sponsored Meetings in-a-Meeting at the AAS Summer Meetings. In May 2011, at the 218th AAS meeting, the AAS Council voted to convert the WGLA, at the end of its mandate, into a Division of the AAS and requested draft Bylaws from the Steering Committee. In January 2012, at the 219th AAS Meeting, the AAS Council formally approved the Bylaws and the creation of the LAD. The inaugural gathering and the first business meeting of the LAD were held at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage in June 2012. You can learn more about LAD by visiting its website at http://lad.aas.org/ and by subscribing to its mailing list.