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Atherectomy Catheter

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Ian N. Gillespie – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A new use of the Simpson percutaneous Atherectomy Catheter: Resection of retained valve cusps of an in-situ vein graft
    CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology, 1995
    Co-Authors: Jane Walker, Nicholas Chalmers, Ian N. Gillespie

    Abstract:

    An in-situ saphenous vein graft occluded because of retained valve cusps. After aspiration thrombectomy, percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty was performed, but reocclusion occurred 11 months later. Following a second aspiration thrombectomy, the restenosed retained cusps were resected using the Simpson percutaneous Atherectomy Catheter. The graft remained patent until the patient’s death from unrelated causes 6 months later.

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  • Amputation of the fine guidewire tip during Atherectomy using the simpson “over-the-wire” peripheral Atherectomy Catheter
    CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology, 1993
    Co-Authors: Kirtikumar Naik, Nicholas Chalmers, Ian N. Gillespie

    Abstract:

    After successful treatment of a localized eccentric atheromatous deposit in the distal superficial femoral artery using the Simpson “over-the-wire” Atherectomy Catheter, a short segment of guidewire tip was noted in the proximal peroneal artery. A digital angiogram of the distal vessels showed satisfactory run-off. There were no immediate clinical sequelae and none after 2 months follow-up.

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Arno Buecker – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Mechanical Recanalization of Subacute Vessel Occlusion in Peripheral Arterial Disease with a Directional Atherectomy Catheter
    CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology, 2012
    Co-Authors: Alexander Massmann, Marcus Katoh, Roushanak Shayesteh-kheslat, Arno Buecker

    Abstract:

    Purpose To retrospectively examine the technical feasibility and safety of directional Atherectomy for treatment of subacute infrainguinal arterial vessel occlusions. Methods Five patients (one woman, four men, age range 51–81 years) with peripheral arterial disease who experienced sudden worsening of their peripheral arterial disease–related symptoms during the last 2–6 weeks underwent digital subtraction angiography, which revealed vessel occlusion in native popliteal artery ( n  = 4) and in-stent occlusion of the superficial femoral artery ( n  = 1). Subsequently, all patients were treated by Atherectomy with the SilverHawk (ev3 Endovascular, USA) device. Results The mean diameter of treated vessels was 5.1 ± 1.0 mm. The length of the occlusion ranged 2–14 cm. The primary technical success rate was 100%. One patient experienced a reocclusion during hospitalization due to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. There were no further periprocedural complications, in particular no peripheral embolizations, until hospital discharge or during the follow-up period of 1 year. Conclusion The recanalization of infrainguinal arterial vessel occlusions by Atherectomy with the SilverHawk device is technically feasible and safe. In our limited retrospective study, it was associated with a high technical success rate and a low procedure-related complication rate.

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  • Mechanical Recanalization of Subacute Vessel Occlusion in Peripheral Arterial Disease with a Directional Atherectomy Catheter
    CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology, 2012
    Co-Authors: Alexander Massmann, Marcus Katoh, Roushanak Shayesteh-kheslat, Arno Buecker

    Abstract:

    To retrospectively examine the technical feasibility and safety of directional Atherectomy for treatment of subacute infrainguinal arterial vessel occlusions. Five patients (one woman, four men, age range 51–81 years) with peripheral arterial disease who experienced sudden worsening of their peripheral arterial disease–related symptoms during the last 2–6 weeks underwent digital subtraction angiography, which revealed vessel occlusion in native popliteal artery (n = 4) and in-stent occlusion of the superficial femoral artery (n = 1). Subsequently, all patients were treated by Atherectomy with the SilverHawk (ev3 Endovascular, USA) device. The mean diameter of treated vessels was 5.1 ± 1.0 mm. The length of the occlusion ranged 2–14 cm. The primary technical success rate was 100%. One patient experienced a reocclusion during hospitalization due to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. There were no further periprocedural complications, in particular no peripheral embolizations, until hospital discharge or during the follow-up period of 1 year. The recanalization of infrainguinal arterial vessel occlusions by Atherectomy with the SilverHawk device is technically feasible and safe. In our limited retrospective study, it was associated with a high technical success rate and a low procedure-related complication rate.

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Mutasumasa Takahashi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Intravascular ultrasound imaging of peripheral arteries as an adjunct to balloon angioplasty and Atherectomy
    CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology, 1996
    Co-Authors: Yukunori Korogi, Toshinori Hirai, Mutasumasa Takahashi

    Abstract:

    This article reviews many of the applications of intravascular ultrasound (US) imaging for peripheral arterial diseases. In vitro studies demonstrate an excellent correlation between ultrasound measurements of lumen and plaque crossectional area compared with histologic sections. In vivo clinical studies reveal the enhanced diagnostic capabilities of this technology compared with angiography. Intravascular US imaging can provide valuable information on the degree, eccentricity, and histologic type of stenosis before intervention, and on the morphological changes in the arterial wall and the extent of excision after intervention. Intravascular US may also serve as a superior index for gauging the diameter of balloon, stent, laser probe, and/or Atherectomy Catheter appropriate for a proposed intervention. Significant new insights into the mechanisms of balloon angioplasty and Atherectomy have been established by intravascular US findings. Intravascular US imaging has been shown to be a more accurate method than angiography for determining the cross-sectional area of the arterial lumen, and for assessing severity of stenosis. Quantitative assessment of the luminal crosssectional area after the balloon dilatation should be more accurate than angiography as intimal tears or dissections produced by the dilation may not be accurately evaluated with angiography. At the present time, intravascular US is still a controversial imaging technique. Outcome studies are currently being organized to assess the clinical value and cost effectiveness of intravascular ultrasound in the context of these interventional procedures.

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