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Atlantoaxial Subluxation

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Minoru Doita – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • c1 laminectomy for retro odontoid pseudotumor without Atlantoaxial Subluxation review of seven consecutive cases
    European Spine Journal, 2013
    Co-Authors: Kenichiro Kakutani, Koji Okamoto, Minoru Doita, Masaho Yoshikawa, Norihide Sha, Masahiro Kurosaka, Koichiro Maeno, Takashi Yurube, Kotaro Nishida

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    A retro-odontoid pseudotumor is usually a reactive fibrocartilaginous mass associated with Atlantoaxial Subluxation (AAS). However, a retro-odontoid pseudotumor not associated with AAS, which undergoes spontaneous regression following C1 laminoplasty, has been reported. The purpose of this study was to report surgical outcomes of C1 laminectomy for retro-odontoid pseudotumor without AAS.

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  • Synovial Cyst at the C1-C2 Junction in a Patient with Atlantoaxial Subluxation
    Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques, 2004
    Co-Authors: Koji Okamoto, Minoru Doita, Masaho Yoshikawa, Michihiko Manabe, Shinichi Yoshiya

    Abstract:

    Abstract:Synovial cysts of the cervical spine causing myelopathy are rare. The pathogenesis of these cysts is often attributed to degenerative changes of the facet joints or microtrauma. The authors report a synovial cyst at the C1-C2 junction in a patient with Atlantoaxial Subluxation without a con

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  • synovial cyst at the c1 c2 junction in a patient with Atlantoaxial Subluxation
    Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques, 2004
    Co-Authors: Koji Okamoto, Minoru Doita, Masaho Yoshikawa, Michihiko Manabe, Norihide Sha, Shinichi Yoshiya

    Abstract:

    Synovial cysts of the cervical spine causing myelopathy are rare. The pathogenesis of these cysts is often attributed to degenerative changes of the facet joints or microtrauma. The authors report a synovial cyst at the C1-C2 junction in a patient with Atlantoaxial Subluxation without a congenital anomaly or inflammatory conditions. A 72-year-old man presented with a progressive right-sided myelopathy attributed to a C1-C2 synovial cyst accompanied by Atlantoaxial Subluxation and C3-C6 spondylosis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed a large cystic mass compressing the spinal cord located at the C1-C2 junction. A C1 hemilaminectomy, complete evacuation of the cyst contents, and posterior Atlantoaxial fusion were performed, and a double-door laminoplasty was also done at C3-C6. The patient showed significant improvement of paresthesia and motor weakness of the right upper and lower extremities immediately after the operation. Synovial cysts should be considered in the differential diagnosis of an extradural mass of the upper cervical spine. Posterior fusion combined with direct excision of the cyst may be the optimum treatment of a synovial cyst at the C1-C2 junction in a patient with Atlantoaxial Subluxation.

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Shinichi Yoshiya – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Synovial Cyst at the C1-C2 Junction in a Patient with Atlantoaxial Subluxation
    Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques, 2004
    Co-Authors: Koji Okamoto, Minoru Doita, Masaho Yoshikawa, Michihiko Manabe, Shinichi Yoshiya

    Abstract:

    Abstract:Synovial cysts of the cervical spine causing myelopathy are rare. The pathogenesis of these cysts is often attributed to degenerative changes of the facet joints or microtrauma. The authors report a synovial cyst at the C1-C2 junction in a patient with Atlantoaxial Subluxation without a con

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  • synovial cyst at the c1 c2 junction in a patient with Atlantoaxial Subluxation
    Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques, 2004
    Co-Authors: Koji Okamoto, Minoru Doita, Masaho Yoshikawa, Michihiko Manabe, Norihide Sha, Shinichi Yoshiya

    Abstract:

    Synovial cysts of the cervical spine causing myelopathy are rare. The pathogenesis of these cysts is often attributed to degenerative changes of the facet joints or microtrauma. The authors report a synovial cyst at the C1-C2 junction in a patient with Atlantoaxial Subluxation without a congenital anomaly or inflammatory conditions. A 72-year-old man presented with a progressive right-sided myelopathy attributed to a C1-C2 synovial cyst accompanied by Atlantoaxial Subluxation and C3-C6 spondylosis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed a large cystic mass compressing the spinal cord located at the C1-C2 junction. A C1 hemilaminectomy, complete evacuation of the cyst contents, and posterior Atlantoaxial fusion were performed, and a double-door laminoplasty was also done at C3-C6. The patient showed significant improvement of paresthesia and motor weakness of the right upper and lower extremities immediately after the operation. Synovial cysts should be considered in the differential diagnosis of an extradural mass of the upper cervical spine. Posterior fusion combined with direct excision of the cyst may be the optimum treatment of a synovial cyst at the C1-C2 junction in a patient with Atlantoaxial Subluxation.

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  • Traumatic anterior Atlantoaxial Subluxation occurring in a professional rugby athlete: case report and review of literature related to Atlantoaxial injuries in sports activities.
    Spine, 2004
    Co-Authors: Hiroshi Miyamoto, Shinichi Yoshiya, Minoru Doita, Kotaro Nishida, Masayoshi Yagi, Yasunobu Iwasaki, Masahiro Kurosaka

    Abstract:

    STUDY DESIGN: This is a case report of traumatic anterior Atlantoaxial Subluxation occurring in a professional rugby athlete with a literature review. OBJECTIVE: To report a rare case of traumatic anterior Atlantoaxial Subluxation in a professional rugby athlete. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Atlantoaxial Subluxation occurring in a professional athlete is very rare, and only two cases have been reported so far. METHODS: A 26-year-old professional rugby player sustained traumatic anterior Atlantoaxial Subluxation. The pathomechanism of the injury was hyperflexion. No quadriplegia existed, but severe anterior Subluxation was found on functional radiographs and kinematic magnetic resonance imaging. RESULTS: Surgical fixation of C1-C2 was carried out, and no impairment was seen in his daily living, although he did not return to professional rugby. CONCLUSIONS: Anterior Atlantoaxial Subluxation in sports activities is very rare. The mechanism of this injury is hyperflexion, and the rupture of the transverse ligament is essential. Good prognosis has been reported; however, a return to high-level sports activities is thought to be a contraindication. Language: en

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Koji Okamoto – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • c1 laminectomy for retro odontoid pseudotumor without Atlantoaxial Subluxation review of seven consecutive cases
    European Spine Journal, 2013
    Co-Authors: Kenichiro Kakutani, Koji Okamoto, Minoru Doita, Masaho Yoshikawa, Norihide Sha, Masahiro Kurosaka, Koichiro Maeno, Takashi Yurube, Kotaro Nishida

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    A retro-odontoid pseudotumor is usually a reactive fibrocartilaginous mass associated with Atlantoaxial Subluxation (AAS). However, a retro-odontoid pseudotumor not associated with AAS, which undergoes spontaneous regression following C1 laminoplasty, has been reported. The purpose of this study was to report surgical outcomes of C1 laminectomy for retro-odontoid pseudotumor without AAS.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • Synovial Cyst at the C1-C2 Junction in a Patient with Atlantoaxial Subluxation
    Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques, 2004
    Co-Authors: Koji Okamoto, Minoru Doita, Masaho Yoshikawa, Michihiko Manabe, Shinichi Yoshiya

    Abstract:

    Abstract:Synovial cysts of the cervical spine causing myelopathy are rare. The pathogenesis of these cysts is often attributed to degenerative changes of the facet joints or microtrauma. The authors report a synovial cyst at the C1-C2 junction in a patient with Atlantoaxial Subluxation without a con

    Free Register to Access Article

  • synovial cyst at the c1 c2 junction in a patient with Atlantoaxial Subluxation
    Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques, 2004
    Co-Authors: Koji Okamoto, Minoru Doita, Masaho Yoshikawa, Michihiko Manabe, Norihide Sha, Shinichi Yoshiya

    Abstract:

    Synovial cysts of the cervical spine causing myelopathy are rare. The pathogenesis of these cysts is often attributed to degenerative changes of the facet joints or microtrauma. The authors report a synovial cyst at the C1-C2 junction in a patient with Atlantoaxial Subluxation without a congenital anomaly or inflammatory conditions. A 72-year-old man presented with a progressive right-sided myelopathy attributed to a C1-C2 synovial cyst accompanied by Atlantoaxial Subluxation and C3-C6 spondylosis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed a large cystic mass compressing the spinal cord located at the C1-C2 junction. A C1 hemilaminectomy, complete evacuation of the cyst contents, and posterior Atlantoaxial fusion were performed, and a double-door laminoplasty was also done at C3-C6. The patient showed significant improvement of paresthesia and motor weakness of the right upper and lower extremities immediately after the operation. Synovial cysts should be considered in the differential diagnosis of an extradural mass of the upper cervical spine. Posterior fusion combined with direct excision of the cyst may be the optimum treatment of a synovial cyst at the C1-C2 junction in a patient with Atlantoaxial Subluxation.

    Free Register to Access Article