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Atmospheric Composition

The Experts below are selected from a list of 312 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Cathy Clerbaux – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Infrared remote sensing of Atmospheric Composition and air quality: Towards operational applications
    Comptes Rendus Geoscience, 2020
    Co-Authors: Cathy Clerbaux, Solène Turquety, Pierre Coheur

    Abstract:

    International audienceAtmospheric remote sensing from satellites is an essential component of the observational strategy deployed to monitor Atmospheric pollution and changing Composition. During this decade, remote sensors using the thermal infrared (TIR) spectral range have demonstrated their ability to sound the troposphere and provide global distribution for some of the key Atmospheric species. This article illustrates three operational applications made possible with the IASI instrument onboard the European satellite MetOp, which opens new perspectives for routine observation of the evolution of Atmospheric Composition from space

  • Atmospheric Composition: IASI’s top ten
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Cathy Clerbaux, Maya George, Sophie Bauduin, Anne Boynard, Pierre-françois Coheur, Lieven Clarisse, Cyril Crevoisier, Stamatia Doniki, Juliette Hadji-lazaro, Daniel Hurtmans

    Abstract:

    The IASI mission is a versatile mission that fulfills the needs of three different communities:
    numerical weather prediction, climate research and Atmospheric Composition monitoring. In order to
    converge on the design of such an instrument all three communities had to make reasonable
    accommodations 20 years ago, and it turns out that this mission is now recognized as essential for
    weather forecasting, and for tracking pollutants/greenhouse gases from space. With the launch of
    MetOp-B and -C and the continuity and new challenges offered by IASI-NG, an exceptional data
    record will be available in the next few years.
    The presentation (movie) illustrates some of the major findings related to Atmospheric Composition
    changes as monitored by IASI during the last 10 years. It relies on accurate data available in near real
    time along with an excellent horizontal coverage. We will show the global scale mapping of gases,
    along with the detection of dust and ash particles, as well as the potential of the mission to catch
    special events such as volcanic eruptions, large fires and pollution peaks.

  • Monitoring of Atmospheric Composition with IASI/MetOp Sounders : ULB/LATMOS data in open access via Ether website
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Juliette Hadji-lazaro, Cathy Clerbaux, Daniel Hurtmans, Maya George, Pierre-françois Coheur, Lieven Clarisse, Cathy Boonne, Martin Van Damme, Simon Whitburn, Thomas August

    Abstract:

    The IASI remote sensor flying onboard the MetOp-A and -B satellites has been providing twice daily observation of the Atmospheric Composition since the end of 2007. Global distributions of several reactive species are retrieved from IASI radiance spectra in near-realtime both at ULB and LATMOS, using dedicated radiative transfer models and retrieval schemes. Among the different algorithms set up, the FORLI software series provides vertical profiles for CO, O3, and HNO3, while alternative methods using brightness temperature differences or so-called “hyperspectral range indices” coupled with look-up tables allow retrieval of SO2, NH3 and VOCs columns. The FORLI software package is now implemented in the EUMETSAT operational processing chain, in the framework of the Ozone and Atmospheric Composition Satellite Application Facility (O3MSAF). CO products are now operationally distributed by EUMETCAST, and SO2, O3 and HNO3 should follow in 2016-2017. In this presentation, we will review the methods and the products available from our processing chains. Global scale distributions of CO, O3 profiles as well as SO2 and NH3 columns can be downloaded from the Ether (AERIS) website for further scientific analysis.

Thierry Leblanc – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC): History, status and perspectives
    , 2017
    Co-Authors: Martine De Mazière, Anne M. Thompson, Michael J. Kurylo, Jeannette Wild, Germar Bernhard, Thomas Blumenstock, James Hannigan, Jean-christopher Lambert, Thierry Leblanc, Thomas J. Mcgee

    Abstract:

    <p><strong>Abstract.</strong> The Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) is an international global network of more than 80 stations making high quality measurements of Atmospheric Composition that began official operations in 1991 after five years of planning. Originally named the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC), the goal of NDACC is to observe changes in the chemical and physical state of the stratosphere and upper troposphere and to assess the impact of such changes on the lower troposphere and climate. NDACC’s origins, station locations, organizational structure and data archiving are described. NDACC is structured around categories of ground-based observational techniques, timely cross-cutting themes (ozone, water vapour, measurement strategies and emphases), satellite measurement systems, and theory and analyses. To widen its scope, NDACC has established formal collaborative agreements with eight other Cooperating Networks. A brief history is provided, major accomplishments of NDACC during its first 25 years of operation are reviewed, and a forward-looking perspective is presented.</p>

  • the network for the detection of Atmospheric Composition change ndacc history status and perspectives
    Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2017
    Co-Authors: Martine De Mazière, Anne M. Thompson, Michael J. Kurylo, Germar Bernhard, Thomas Blumenstock, James Hannigan, Jean-christopher Lambert, J D Wild, G O Braathen, Thierry Leblanc

    Abstract:

    The Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) is an international global network of more than 90 stations making high-quality measurements of Atmospheric Composition that began official operations in 1991 after 5 years of planning. Apart from sonde measurements, all measurements in the network are performed by ground-based remote-sensing techniques. Originally named the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC), the name of the network was changed to NDACC in 2005 to better reflect the expanded scope of its measurements. The primary goal of NDACC is to establish long-term databases for detecting changes and trends in the chemical and physical state of the atmosphere (mesosphere, stratosphere, and troposphere) and to assess the coupling of such changes with climate and air quality. NDACC’s origins, station locations, organizational structure, and data archiving are described. NDACC is structured around categories of ground-based observational techniques (sonde, lidar, microwave radiometers, Fourier-transform infrared, UV-visible DOAS (differential optical absorption spectroscopy)-type, and Dobson–Brewer spectrometers, as well as spectral UV radiometers), timely cross-cutting themes (ozone, water vapour, measurement strategies, cross-network data integration), satellite measurement systems, and theory and analyses. Participation in NDACC requires compliance with strict measurement and data protocols to ensure that the network data are of high and consistent quality. To widen its scope, NDACC has established formal collaborative agreements with eight other cooperating networks and Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW). A brief history is provided, major accomplishments of NDACC during its first 25 years of operation are reviewed, and a forward-looking perspective is presented.

Richard J. Engelen – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The CAMS reanalysis of Atmospheric Composition
    Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2019
    Co-Authors: Antje Inness, Melanie Ades, Anna Agusti-panareda, Jerome Barre, A. Benedictow, A.-m. Blechschmidt, Juan Jose Dominguez, Richard J. Engelen, Henk Eskes, Johannes Flemming

    Abstract:

    The Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) reanalysis is the latest global reanalysis dataset of Atmospheric Composition produced by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), consisting of three-dimensional time-consistent Atmospheric Composition fields, including aerosols and chemical species. The dataset currently covers the period 2003–2016 and will be extended in the future by adding 1 year each year. A reanalysis for greenhouse gases is being produced separately. The CAMS reanalysis builds on the experience gained during the production of the earlier Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) reanalysis and CAMS interim reanalysis. Satellite retrievals of total column CO; tropospheric column NO2; aerosol optical depth (AOD); and total column, partial column and profile ozone retrievals were assimilated for the CAMS reanalysis with ECMWF’s Integrated Forecasting System. The new reanalysis has an increased horizontal resolution of about 80 km and provides more chemical species at a better temporal resolution (3-hourly analysis fields, 3-hourly forecast fields and hourly surface forecast fields) than the previously produced CAMS interim reanalysis. The CAMS reanalysis has smaller biases compared with most of the independent ozone, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and aerosol optical depth observations used for validation in this paper than the previous two reanalyses and is much improved and more consistent in time, especially compared to the MACC reanalysis. The CAMS reanalysis is a dataset that can be used to compute climatologies, study trends, evaluate models, benchmark other reanalyses or serve as boundary conditions for regional models for past periods.

  • The CAMS reanalysis of Atmospheric Composition
    , 2018
    Co-Authors: Antje Inness, Melanie Ades, Anna Agusti-panareda, Jerome Barre, A. Benedictow, A.-m. Blechschmidt, Juan Jose Dominguez, Richard J. Engelen, Henk Eskes, Johannes Flemming

    Abstract:

    <p><strong>Abstract.</strong> The Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) reanalysis is the latest global reanalysis data set of Atmospheric Composition produced by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), consisting of 3-dimensional time-consistent Atmospheric Composition fields, including aerosols and chemical species. The dataset currently covers the period 2003–2016 and will be extended in the future by adding one year each year. A reanalysis for greenhouse gases is being produced separately. The CAMS reanalysis builds on the experience gained during the production of the earlier Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) reanalysis and CAMS interim reanalysis. Satellite retrievals of total column CO, tropospheric column NO<sub>2</sub>, aerosol optical depth and total column, partial column and profile ozone retrievals were assimilated for the CAMS reanalysis with ECMWF’s Integrated Forecasting System. The new reanalysis has an increased horizontal resolution of about 80 km and provides more chemical species at a better temporal resolution (3-hourly analysis fields, 3-hourly forecast fields and hourly surface forecast fields) than the previously produced CAMS interim reanalysis. The CAMS reanalysis has smaller biases compared to independent ozone, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and aerosol optical depth observations than the previous two reanalyses and is much improved and more consistent in time, especially compared to the MACC reanalysis. The CAMS reanalysis is a dataset that can be used to compute climatologies, study trends, evaluate models, benchmark other reanalyses or serve as boundary conditions for regional models for past periods.</p>

  • the macc reanalysis an 8 yr data set of Atmospheric Composition
    Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2012
    Co-Authors: Antje Inness, Cathy Clerbaux, Pierre-françois Coheur, A. Benedetti, Idir Bouarar, Frank Baier, S Chabrillat, Hannah Clark, Richard J. Engelen

    Abstract:

    Abstract. An eight-year long reanalysis of Atmospheric Composition data covering the period 2003–2010 was constructed as part of the FP7-funded Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate project by assimilating satellite data into a global model and data assimilation system. This reanalysis provides fields of chemically reactive gases, namely carbon monoxide, ozone, nitrogen oxides, and formaldehyde, as well as aerosols and greenhouse gases globally at a horizontal resolution of about 80 km for both the troposphere and the stratosphere. This paper describes the assimilation system for the reactive gases and presents validation results for the reactive gas analysis fields to document the data set and to give a first indication of its quality. Tropospheric CO values from the MACC reanalysis are on average 10–20% lower than routine observations from commercial aircrafts over airports through most of the troposphere, and have larger negative biases in the boundary layer at urban sites affected by air pollution, possibly due to an underestimation of CO or precursor emissions. Stratospheric ozone fields from the MACC reanalysis agree with ozonesondes and ACE-FTS data to within ±10% in most seasons and regions. In the troposphere the reanalysis shows biases of −5% to +10% with respect to ozonesondes and aircraft data in the extratropics, but has larger negative biases in the tropics. Area-averaged total column ozone agrees with ozone fields from a multi-sensor reanalysis data set to within a few percent. NO 2 fields from the reanalysis show the right seasonality over polluted urban areas of the NH and over tropical biomass burning areas, but underestimate wintertime NO 2 maxima over anthropogenic pollution regions and overestimate NO 2 in northern and southern Africa during the tropical biomass burning seasons. Tropospheric HCHO is well simulated in the MACC reanalysis even though no satellite data are assimilated. It shows good agreement with independent SCIAMACHY retrievals over regions dominated by biogenic emissions with some anthropogenic input, such as the eastern US and China, and also over African regions influenced by biogenic sources and biomass burning.