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Attention Process

The Experts below are selected from a list of 84 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Mckay Moore Sohlberg – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Attention Process training 3 to improve reading comprehension in mild aphasia a single case experimental design study
    Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, 2020
    Co-Authors: Mckay Moore Sohlberg, Beth Harn, Robert H Horner, Leora R Cherney

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACTPeople with aphasia frequently present with nonlinguistic deficits, in addition to their compromised language abilities, which may contribute to their problems with reading comprehension. T…

  • evaluation of Attention Process training and brain injury education in persons with acquired brain injury
    Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 2000
    Co-Authors: Mckay Moore Sohlberg, Karen A Mclaughlin, Antonella Pavese, Anke Heidrich, Michael I Posner

    Abstract:

    Fourteen patients with stable acquired brain injuries exhibiting Attention and working memory deficits were given 10 weeks of Attention Process training (APT) and 10 weeks of brain injury education in a cross-over design. Structured interviews and neuropsychological tests were used prior to rehabilitation and after both treatments to determine the influence of the interventions on tasks of daily life and performance on Attentional networks involving vigilance, orienting, and executive function. The overall results showed that most patients made improvements. Some of these gains were due to practice from repetitive administration of the tests. In addition, the type of intervention also influenced the results. The brain injury education seemed to be most effective in improving self-reports of psychosocial function. APT influenced self-reports of cognitive function and had a stronger influence on performance of executive Attention tasks than was found with the brain injury education therapy. Vigilance and or…

  • evaluation of Attention Process training and brain injury
    Neuropsychology development and cognition. Section A Journal of clinical and experimental neuropsychology, 2000
    Co-Authors: Mckay Moore Sohlberg, Karen A Mclaughlin, Antonella Pavese, Anke Heidrich, Michael I Posner

    Abstract:

    Fourteen patients with stable acquired brain injuries exhibiting Attention and working memory deficits were given 10 weeks of Attention Process training (APT) and 10 weeks of brain injury education in a cross-over design. Structured interviews and neuropsychological tests were used prior to rehabilitation and after both treatments to determine the influence of the interventions on tasks of daily life and performance on Attentional networks involving vigilance, orienting, and executive function. The overall results showed that most patients made improvements. Some of these gains were due to practice from repetitive administration of the tests. In addition, the type of intervention also influenced the results. The brain injury education seemed to be most effective in improving self-reports of psychosocial function. APT influenced self-reports of cognitive function and had a stronger influence on performance of executive Attention tasks than was found with the brain injury education therapy. Vigilance and orienting networks showed little specific improvement due to therapy. However, vigilance level influenced the improvement with therapy on some tests of executive Attention. We consider the implications of these results for future studies of the locus of Attentional improvement and for the design of improved interventions.

Suzanne Barkercollo – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • reducing Attention deficits after stroke using Attention Process training a randomized controlled trial
    Stroke, 2009
    Co-Authors: Suzanne Barkercollo, Valery L Feigin, Carlene M M Lawes, Varsha Parag, Anthony Rodgers

    Abstract:

    Background and Purpose— Impaired Attention contributes to poor stroke outcomes. Attention Process training (APT) reduces Attention deficits after traumatic brain injury. There was no evidence for effectiveness of APT in stroke patients. This trial evaluated effectiveness of APT in improving Attention and broader outcomes in stroke survivors 6 months after stroke. Methods— Participants in this prospective, single-blinded, randomized, clinical trial were 78 incident stroke survivors admitted over 18 months and identified via neuropsychological assessment as having Attention deficit. Participants were randomly allocated to standard care plus up to 30 hours of APT or standard care alone. Both groups were impaired (z≤−2.0) across measures of Attention at baseline, with the exception of Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test, which was below average (z≤−1.0). Outcome assessment occurred at 5 weeks and 6 months after randomization. The primary outcome was Integrated Visual Auditory Continuous Performance Test Full-…

  • a randomised controlled trial of Attention Process training post stroke rationale design and preliminary findings of the start study
    Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 2008
    Co-Authors: Suzanne Barkercollo, Valery L Feigin, Carlene M M Lawes, Varsha Parag, X Chen, Margaret Dudley

    Abstract:

    Introduction/Objectives: Impairments in Attention contribute to poor outcomes, and Attention is the basis for other areas of cognition (e.g., memory and communication). Attention Process Training (APT) has been shown using small samples to be effective in reducing Attention deficits in persons with traumatic brain injury. There is no robust evidence for the effectiveness of APT in stroke patients. Aims: To determine the effectiveness of APT in improving Attention and health related quality of life (HRQoL) in stroke survivors at 6-months after the stroke. Secondary aims are to determine the impact of APT on: (a) disability and handicap at 6-month post stroke; and (b) other neuropsychological functions in stroke survivors at 6-months post stroke. Participants, Materials/Methods: This is a prospective, open, randomised, clinical trial. Participants are randomly allocated to receive either APT or standard care. Those in the APT group receive 30 hours of individual APT training. The remainder receive standard care. APT materials consist of a group of hierarchically organised tasks that exercise different components of Attention, including sustained, selective, alternating, and divided Attention. The intervention is administered by a neuropsychologist. Participants are survivors of first-ever stroke admitted to acute rehabilitation units of Auckland hospitals across an 18-month period, identified via neuropsychological assessment as having an Attention deficit. Exclusion criteria: (1) inability to give informed consent; (2) severe cognitive deficits precluding participation in APT; (3) medically unstable; (4) not fluent in English, as standardised administration of tests requires English fluency; or (5) another condition that could impact results. Results: The main outcomes of interest are Attention deficit as indicated by the IVA-CPT Attention Quotient score and the MCS/PCS on a HRQoL measure (SF-36), in stroke survivors at 6 months after the stroke. In this presentation, descriptive data for the first 75 randomised participants will be presented along with initial findings of preliminary analyses related to these primary outcome measures. There was great variability in Attention at baseline. Participation in the intervention resulted in significant improvement in Attention. Conclusions: The findings are of significance to evidencebased planning of rehabilitation and health service utilisation, and improving stroke outcomes. Initial findings indicate the APT is likely to have a positive effect. If APT is indeed found to be an effective means of improving Attention and HRQoL post-stroke, this trial will provide a new direction for rehabilitation efforts, which have traditionally focused on motor functioning, language and activities of daily living.

Michael I Posner – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • evaluation of Attention Process training and brain injury education in persons with acquired brain injury
    Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 2000
    Co-Authors: Mckay Moore Sohlberg, Karen A Mclaughlin, Antonella Pavese, Anke Heidrich, Michael I Posner

    Abstract:

    Fourteen patients with stable acquired brain injuries exhibiting Attention and working memory deficits were given 10 weeks of Attention Process training (APT) and 10 weeks of brain injury education in a cross-over design. Structured interviews and neuropsychological tests were used prior to rehabilitation and after both treatments to determine the influence of the interventions on tasks of daily life and performance on Attentional networks involving vigilance, orienting, and executive function. The overall results showed that most patients made improvements. Some of these gains were due to practice from repetitive administration of the tests. In addition, the type of intervention also influenced the results. The brain injury education seemed to be most effective in improving self-reports of psychosocial function. APT influenced self-reports of cognitive function and had a stronger influence on performance of executive Attention tasks than was found with the brain injury education therapy. Vigilance and or…

  • evaluation of Attention Process training and brain injury
    Neuropsychology development and cognition. Section A Journal of clinical and experimental neuropsychology, 2000
    Co-Authors: Mckay Moore Sohlberg, Karen A Mclaughlin, Antonella Pavese, Anke Heidrich, Michael I Posner

    Abstract:

    Fourteen patients with stable acquired brain injuries exhibiting Attention and working memory deficits were given 10 weeks of Attention Process training (APT) and 10 weeks of brain injury education in a cross-over design. Structured interviews and neuropsychological tests were used prior to rehabilitation and after both treatments to determine the influence of the interventions on tasks of daily life and performance on Attentional networks involving vigilance, orienting, and executive function. The overall results showed that most patients made improvements. Some of these gains were due to practice from repetitive administration of the tests. In addition, the type of intervention also influenced the results. The brain injury education seemed to be most effective in improving self-reports of psychosocial function. APT influenced self-reports of cognitive function and had a stronger influence on performance of executive Attention tasks than was found with the brain injury education therapy. Vigilance and orienting networks showed little specific improvement due to therapy. However, vigilance level influenced the improvement with therapy on some tests of executive Attention. We consider the implications of these results for future studies of the locus of Attentional improvement and for the design of improved interventions.