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Attitude Research

The Experts below are selected from a list of 225 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Caitlin Mertzlufft – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • mobile technology resident Attitude Research
    Tourism Management, 2016
    Co-Authors: Emily P Ayscue, Bynum B Boley, Caitlin Mertzlufft

    Abstract:

    This Research note highlights the novelty of integrating location-based services (LBS) available on Smart Phones and Tablets into traditional resident Attitude survey methodologies such as door-to-door data collection. It specifically reviews how the LBS technology available on mobile devices can be used to systematically capture GPS coordinates of one’s residence and integrate this captured spatial information into software such as ArcGIS and SPSS for further analysis. By having GPS coordinates associated with respondents’ answers, Researchers have an additional layer of information available for conducting a multitude of tests previously not possible with subjective categorical spatial data. Two Research applications using the spatial location of residences are provided as examples of how LBS available on mobile devices can be integrated within resident Attitude projects. The use of LBS technology can help Researchers better understand how the distance residents live from major tourist attractions influences their Attitudes towards tourism.

  • Mobile technology & resident Attitude Research
    Tourism Management, 2016
    Co-Authors: Emily P Ayscue, Bynum B Boley, Caitlin Mertzlufft

    Abstract:

    This Research note highlights the novelty of integrating location-based services (LBS) available on Smart Phones and Tablets into traditional resident Attitude survey methodologies such as door-to-door data collection. It specifically reviews how the LBS technology available on mobile devices can be used to systematically capture GPS coordinates of one’s residence and integrate this captured spatial information into software such as ArcGIS and SPSS for further analysis. By having GPS coordinates associated with respondents’ answers, Researchers have an additional layer of information available for conducting a multitude of tests previously not possible with subjective categorical spatial data. Two Research applications using the spatial location of residences are provided as examples of how LBS available on mobile devices can be integrated within resident Attitude projects. The use of LBS technology can help Researchers better understand how the distance residents live from major tourist attractions influences their Attitudes towards tourism.

Dermot Barnesholmes – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • a functional cognitive framework for Attitude Research
    European Review of Social Psychology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Jan De Houwer, Bertram Gawronski, Dermot Barnesholmes

    Abstract:

    In Attitude Research, behaviours are often used as proxies for Attitudes and attitudinal processes. This practice is problematic because it conflates the behaviours that need to be explained (explanandum) with the mental constructs that are used to explain these behaviours (explanans). In the current chapter we propose a meta-theoretical framework that resolves this problem by distinguishing between two levels of analysis. According to the proposed framework, Attitude Research can be conceptualised as the scientific study of evaluation. Evaluation is defined not in terms of mental constructs but in terms of elements in the environment, more specifically, as the effect of stimuli on evaluative responses. From this perspective, Attitude Research provides answers to two questions: (1) Which elements in the environment moderate evaluation? (2) What mental processes and representations mediate evaluation? Research on the first question provides explanations of evaluative responses in terms of elements in the e…

  • the dominance of associative theorizing in implicit Attitude Research propositional and behavioral alternatives
    Psychological Record, 2011
    Co-Authors: Sean Joseph Hughes, Dermot Barnesholmes, Jan De Houwer

    Abstract:

    In the present article we re-examine one of the most deeply entrenched assumptions in modern Attitude Research, namely, that implicit social cognition is a product of associations between mental representations. More precisely, we argue that the analysis of implicit social cognition in psychology is curtailed by the widespread adoption of the associative assumption. We open with a brief overview of the Attitude literature, with a particular emphasis on the fundamental structure, measurement, and conceptual differences that have emerged between implicit and explicit Attitudes in recent times. Thereafter we address the influence of the associative assumption in shaping our methodologies, Research questions, and theories regarding implicit and explicit Attitudes. In the third and final section, we offer two alternative and perhaps complementary nonassociative models for understanding implicit cognition. While the first model situates its explanation at the mental (propositional) level of analysis and the second at the functional, each potentially allows for novel theoretical and empirical predictions and insight into Attitudes above and beyond the boundaries of traditional associationism.

Norbert Schwarz – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Blackwell Handbook of Social Psychology: Intraindividual Processes – Attitudes, persuasion, and behavior
    Blackwell Handbook of Social Psychology: Intraindividual Processes, 2007
    Co-Authors: Gerd Bohner, Norbert Schwarz

    Abstract:

    Social psychologists conceptualize Attitudes as “a psychological tendency that is expressed by evaluating a particular entity with some degree of favor or disfavor” (Eagly & Chaiken, 1993, p. 1; see chapter 20, this volume, for a review of different definitions). Although most definitions characterize Attitudes as relatively enduring mental states, Attitudes change as people interact with their social environment. In fact, the bulk of Attitude Research has addressed the conditions and processes of Attitude change. Understanding the dynamics of Attitude change is as useful for basic Researchers who try to explain social information processing as it is vital for practitioners in business, health, law, marketing, or politics who are interested in effective strategies of influencing Attitudes and behavior. The present chapter provides a selective review of mainstream theorizing in two key areas of Attitude Research. We first address Attitude change through persuasion and subsequently review Research into the Attitude–behavior relationship. Issues pertaining to the conceptualization of Attitudes and the emergence of context effects in Attitude measurement are discussed by Schwarz and Bohner (chapter 20, this volume).

  • Attitude Research between ockham s razor and the fundamental attribution error
    Journal of Consumer Research, 2006
    Co-Authors: Norbert Schwarz

    Abstract:

    Attitudes are hypothetical constructs invented by Researchers to explain phenomena of interest. Their appeal reflects the common preference for dispositional explanations. Construal models account for the same phenomena without assuming enduring predispositions and are better suited to accommodate a core requirement of any adaptive system of evaluation, namely, high context sensitivity.