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Audio Band

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Thomas Corbitt – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Measurement of quantum back action in the Audio Band at room temperature
    Nature, 2019
    Co-Authors: Jonathan Cripe, Nancy Aggarwal, Robert Lanza, Adam Libson, Robinjeet Singh, David Follman, Garrett D. Cole, Nergis Mavalvala, Thomas Corbitt

    Abstract:

    Quantum mechanics places a fundamental limit on the precision of continuous measurements. The Heisenberg uncertainty principle dictates that as the precision of a measurement of an observable (for example, position) increases, back action creates increased uncertainty in the conjugate variable (for example, momentum). In interferometric gravitational-wave detectors, higher laser powers reduce the position uncertainty created by shot noise (the photon-counting error caused by the quantum nature of the laser) but necessarily do so at the expense of back action in the form of quantum radiation pressure noise (QRPN)^ 1 . Once at design sensitivity, the gravitational-wave detectors Advanced LIGO^ 2 , VIRGO^ 3 and KAGRA^ 4 will be limited by QRPN at frequencies between 10 hertz and 100 hertz. There exist several proposals to improve the sensitivity of gravitational-wave detectors by mitigating QRPN^ 5 – 10 , but until now no platform has allowed for experimental tests of these ideas. Here we present a broadBand measurement of QRPN at room temperature at frequencies relevant to gravitational-wave detectors. The noise spectrum obtained shows effects due to QRPN between about 2 kilohertz and 100 kilohertz, and the measured magnitude of QRPN agrees with our model. We now have a testbed for studying techniques with which to mitigate quantum back action, such as variational readout and squeezed light injection^ 7 , with the aim of improving the sensitivity of future gravitational-wave detectors. Future gravitational-wave detectors are expected to be limited by quantum back action, which is now found in the Audio Band in a low-loss optomechanical system.

  • measurement of quantum back action in the Audio Band at room temperature
    Nature, 2019
    Co-Authors: Jonathan Cripe, N Mavalvala, Nancy Aggarwal, Robert Lanza, Adam Libson, Robinjeet Singh, David Follman, Garrett D. Cole, Thomas Corbitt

    Abstract:

    Quantum mechanics places a fundamental limit on the precision of continuous measurements. The Heisenberg uncertainty principle dictates that as the precision of a measurement of an observable (for example, position) increases, back action creates increased uncertainty in the conjugate variable (for example, momentum). In interferometric gravitational-wave detectors, higher laser powers reduce the position uncertainty created by shot noise (the photon-counting error caused by the quantum nature of the laser) but necessarily do so at the expense of back action in the form of quantum radiation pressure noise (QRPN)1. Once at design sensitivity, the gravitational-wave detectors Advanced LIGO2, VIRGO3 and KAGRA4 will be limited by QRPN at frequencies between 10 hertz and 100 hertz. There exist several proposals to improve the sensitivity of gravitational-wave detectors by mitigating QRPN5–10, but until now no platform has allowed for experimental tests of these ideas. Here we present a broadBand measurement of QRPN at room temperature at frequencies relevant to gravitational-wave detectors. The noise spectrum obtained shows effects due to QRPN between about 2 kilohertz and 100 kilohertz, and the measured magnitude of QRPN agrees with our model. We now have a testbed for studying techniques with which to mitigate quantum back action, such as variational readout and squeezed light injection7, with the aim of improving the sensitivity of future gravitational-wave detectors.

  • quantum back action cancellation in the Audio Band
    arXiv: Quantum Physics, 2018
    Co-Authors: Jonathan Cripe, David Follman, Garrett D. Cole, Torrey Cullen, Y Chen, Thomas Corbitt

    Abstract:

    We report on the cancellation of quantum back action noise in an optomechanical cavity. We perform two measurements of the displacement of the microresonator, one in reflection of the cavity, and one in transmission of the cavity. We show that measuring the amplitude quadrature of the light in transmission of the optomechanical cavity allows us to cancel the back action noise between 1 kHz and 50 kHz, and obtain a more sensitive measurement of the microresonator’s position. To confirm that the back action is eliminated, we measure the noise in the transmission signal as a function of circulating power. By splitting the transmitted light onto two photodetectors and cross correlating the two signals, we remove the contributon from shot noise and measure a quantum noise free thermal noise spectrum. Eliminating the effects of back action in this frequency regime is an important demonstration of a technique that could be used to mitigate the effects of back action in interferometric gravitational wave detectors such as Advanced LIGO.

Jonathan Cripe – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Measurement of quantum back action in the Audio Band at room temperature
    Nature, 2019
    Co-Authors: Jonathan Cripe, Nancy Aggarwal, Robert Lanza, Adam Libson, Robinjeet Singh, David Follman, Garrett D. Cole, Nergis Mavalvala, Thomas Corbitt

    Abstract:

    Quantum mechanics places a fundamental limit on the precision of continuous measurements. The Heisenberg uncertainty principle dictates that as the precision of a measurement of an observable (for example, position) increases, back action creates increased uncertainty in the conjugate variable (for example, momentum). In interferometric gravitational-wave detectors, higher laser powers reduce the position uncertainty created by shot noise (the photon-counting error caused by the quantum nature of the laser) but necessarily do so at the expense of back action in the form of quantum radiation pressure noise (QRPN)^ 1 . Once at design sensitivity, the gravitational-wave detectors Advanced LIGO^ 2 , VIRGO^ 3 and KAGRA^ 4 will be limited by QRPN at frequencies between 10 hertz and 100 hertz. There exist several proposals to improve the sensitivity of gravitational-wave detectors by mitigating QRPN^ 5 – 10 , but until now no platform has allowed for experimental tests of these ideas. Here we present a broadBand measurement of QRPN at room temperature at frequencies relevant to gravitational-wave detectors. The noise spectrum obtained shows effects due to QRPN between about 2 kilohertz and 100 kilohertz, and the measured magnitude of QRPN agrees with our model. We now have a testbed for studying techniques with which to mitigate quantum back action, such as variational readout and squeezed light injection^ 7 , with the aim of improving the sensitivity of future gravitational-wave detectors. Future gravitational-wave detectors are expected to be limited by quantum back action, which is now found in the Audio Band in a low-loss optomechanical system.

  • measurement of quantum back action in the Audio Band at room temperature
    Nature, 2019
    Co-Authors: Jonathan Cripe, N Mavalvala, Nancy Aggarwal, Robert Lanza, Adam Libson, Robinjeet Singh, David Follman, Garrett D. Cole, Thomas Corbitt

    Abstract:

    Quantum mechanics places a fundamental limit on the precision of continuous measurements. The Heisenberg uncertainty principle dictates that as the precision of a measurement of an observable (for example, position) increases, back action creates increased uncertainty in the conjugate variable (for example, momentum). In interferometric gravitational-wave detectors, higher laser powers reduce the position uncertainty created by shot noise (the photon-counting error caused by the quantum nature of the laser) but necessarily do so at the expense of back action in the form of quantum radiation pressure noise (QRPN)1. Once at design sensitivity, the gravitational-wave detectors Advanced LIGO2, VIRGO3 and KAGRA4 will be limited by QRPN at frequencies between 10 hertz and 100 hertz. There exist several proposals to improve the sensitivity of gravitational-wave detectors by mitigating QRPN5–10, but until now no platform has allowed for experimental tests of these ideas. Here we present a broadBand measurement of QRPN at room temperature at frequencies relevant to gravitational-wave detectors. The noise spectrum obtained shows effects due to QRPN between about 2 kilohertz and 100 kilohertz, and the measured magnitude of QRPN agrees with our model. We now have a testbed for studying techniques with which to mitigate quantum back action, such as variational readout and squeezed light injection7, with the aim of improving the sensitivity of future gravitational-wave detectors.

  • quantum back action cancellation in the Audio Band
    arXiv: Quantum Physics, 2018
    Co-Authors: Jonathan Cripe, David Follman, Garrett D. Cole, Torrey Cullen, Y Chen, Thomas Corbitt

    Abstract:

    We report on the cancellation of quantum back action noise in an optomechanical cavity. We perform two measurements of the displacement of the microresonator, one in reflection of the cavity, and one in transmission of the cavity. We show that measuring the amplitude quadrature of the light in transmission of the optomechanical cavity allows us to cancel the back action noise between 1 kHz and 50 kHz, and obtain a more sensitive measurement of the microresonator’s position. To confirm that the back action is eliminated, we measure the noise in the transmission signal as a function of circulating power. By splitting the transmitted light onto two photodetectors and cross correlating the two signals, we remove the contributon from shot noise and measure a quantum noise free thermal noise spectrum. Eliminating the effects of back action in this frequency regime is an important demonstration of a technique that could be used to mitigate the effects of back action in interferometric gravitational wave detectors such as Advanced LIGO.

Rajeev Bhujade – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A reconfigurable upper Audio Band modem for data communication between mobile devices
    Analog Integrated Circuits and Signal Processing, 2014
    Co-Authors: Rahul Sinha, P Balamuralidhar, Rajeev Bhujade

    Abstract:

    For communicating short data sequences over small distances, the use of devices with conventional wireless radio frequency interfaces requires standardized hardware, dedicated infrastructure and appropriate Link/Network layer protocols. To address challenges associated with these requirements, a communication mechanism using devices which support simple Audio interfaces (speakers and microphones) is proposed using the upper Audio Band (UAB) of frequencies (16–20 kHz). Devices with Audio interfaces can be deployed in a personal area network for communicating at low data rates over small distances. Multi-tone FSK modulation is used for transmitting Reed–Solomon encoded data over the UAB. For peer-to-peer communication applications, a sensing mechanism is enabled on the receiving device to sense for empty time–frequency slots and schedule its data transmission at the appropriate times. A system prototype is developed using portable speakers and smartphones with sensitive microphones. The effective throughput of the modem is evaluated for different sensing durations and distances. Ad-hoc peer-to-peer networks can be enabled between mobile devices for communicating short data sequences based on the UAB modem.

  • an upper Audio Band based low data rate communication modem
    International Conference on Signal Processing and Communication Systems, 2012
    Co-Authors: Rahul Sinha, P Balamuralidhar, Rajeev Bhujade

    Abstract:

    Readily available Audio interfaces on mobile devices (speakers and microphones) can be used to communicate data over a short range without the need for expensive infrastructure, using the imperceptible upper Audio Band (16–20KHz) of frequencies. A multi-tone Frequency Shift Keying (FSK) modulation is proposed for communication over the upper Audio Band. Error rate performance results for Multi-tone FSK modulation over white Gaussian noise channels are reported. Test results with a prototype modem developed are given. A sensing and spectrum access mechanism for devices with Audio interfaces is proposed using protocol sequences.

  • ICSPCS – An upper Audio Band based low data rate communication modem
    2012 6th International Conference on Signal Processing and Communication Systems, 2012
    Co-Authors: Rahul Sinha, P Balamuralidhar, Rajeev Bhujade

    Abstract:

    Readily available Audio interfaces on mobile devices (speakers and microphones) can be used to communicate data over a short range without the need for expensive infrastructure, using the imperceptible upper Audio Band (16–20KHz) of frequencies. A multi-tone Frequency Shift Keying (FSK) modulation is proposed for communication over the upper Audio Band. Error rate performance results for Multi-tone FSK modulation over white Gaussian noise channels are reported. Test results with a prototype modem developed are given. A sensing and spectrum access mechanism for devices with Audio interfaces is proposed using protocol sequences.