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Aural Rehabilitation

The Experts below are selected from a list of 303 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Gerhard Andersson – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • experiences of an internet based Aural Rehabilitation iar program for hearing aid users a qualitative study
    International Journal of Audiology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Milijana Malmberg, Gerhard Andersson, Thomas Lunner, Elisabet Sundewall Thoren, Marie Oberg, Kim Kahari

    Abstract:

    AbstractObjective: Internet interventions for hearing aid (HA) users have been shown to be effective in helping persons with hearing problems. As earlier research refers to objective data on these effects, little is known about how participants experience the Internet interventions subjectively. The aim of the present study was to explore participants’ experiences of an Internet-based Aural Rehabilitation (IAR) program for HA-users, and to explore the possible subjective benefits of such a program.Design: A qualitative exploratory design was implemented involving semi-structured telephone interviews. The interviews were transcribed and analysed using content analysis.Study sample: Interviews were conducted with 20 participants (9 men and 11 women) who had completed an IAR program for HA-users. The participants were 57–81 years old and had used HAs for 2–25 years.Results: The results are organised in three main categories: general experiences associated with participating in the program, knowledge obtained…

  • evaluating the short term and long term effects of an internet based Aural Rehabilitation programme for hearing aid users in general clinical practice a randomised controlled trial
    BMJ Open, 2017
    Co-Authors: Milijana Malmberg, Thomas Lunner, Kim Kahari, Gerhard Andersson

    Abstract:

    Objective Guided internet-based intervention beyond hearing aid (HA) fitting has been shown to be efficacious in randomised controlled trials (RCTs). However, internet interventions have rarely been applied clinically as a part of regular Aural Rehabilitation (AR). Our aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of internet-based AR for HA users from a clinical population. Outcome measures The Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE) was used as the primary outcome measure, and the Communication Strategies Scale (CSS) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were used as secondary outcome measures. All questionnaires were administered before and directly after the intervention and at 6 months postintervention. Methods We used a parallel group design (RCT). The data were collected in 2013–2014 at three different clinics. Seventy-four HA users were randomly assigned to receive either full internet-based AR (intervention group, n=37) or one element of the internet-based AR (control group, n=37). Results Data were analysed following the intention-to-treat principle. Each group showed improved HHIE scores over time and did not differ significantly from each other. The intervention group showed significantly greater improvement compared with the control group for the CSS total and the non-verbal subscale scores. The intervention group and control group were also subdivided into two age groups: 20–59 years and 60–80 years. Significantly better improvement on the CSS total and non-verbal subscale scores was found in the older group compared with the younger participants. Conclusions This study indicates that participants in an internet-based intervention applied in general clinical practice showed improved self-reported communication skills compared with a control group. Receiving a full intervention was not more effective in improving self-reported hearing problems than receiving just one element of the internet-based intervention. Trial registration number This trial is registered at ClinicalTrals.gov, NCT01837550; results.

  • implementing internet based Aural Rehabilitation in a general clinical practice
    American Journal of Audiology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Milijana Malmberg, Gerhard Andersson, Thomas Lunner, Kim Kahari, Gunilla Jansson

    Abstract:

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to share the lessons that were learned about the process of implementing an Internet-based, randomized controlled trial (RCT) in general clinical practice (GCP) and to address some of the advantages of using the Internet as a tool to implement a RCT in GCP. The RCT implemented focused on investigating Internet-based Aural Rehabilitation (AR) in addition to hearing aid (HA)-fitting supplemented with telephone support, and it was applied in a clinical setting. The results of this RCT and the questionnaires chosen will be presented in an article elsewhere. Procedure Here, the procedure of the implemented trial is presented, and the implementation challenges are presented and discussed. Specifically, we describe the trial research question, recruitment strategy, patient eligibility criteria, the questionnaires, clinician participation, funding and time (for the clinicians), and risks and benefits (for the participants). Discussion The trial implementation showed that AR in…

Samantha Mcneilly – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • AUM Library Research Guides. COMM 4620: Aural Rehabilitation, Habilitation, and Hearing Conservation (Alisha Jones). Home.
    , 2013
    Co-Authors: Samantha Mcneilly

    Abstract:

    AUM Library Research Guides. COMM 4620: Aural Rehabilitation, Habilitation, and Hearing Conservation (Alisha Jones). Home.

  • AUM Library Research Guides. COMM 4620: Aural Rehabilitation, Habilitation, and Hearing Conservation (Alisha Jones). Finding Articles.
    , 2013
    Co-Authors: Samantha Mcneilly

    Abstract:

    AUM Library Research Guides. COMM 4620: Aural Rehabilitation, Habilitation, and Hearing Conservation (Alisha Jones). Finding Articles.

  • AUM Library Research Guides. COMM 4620: Aural Rehabilitation, Habilitation, and Hearing Conservation (Alisha Jones). Reference Books.
    , 2013
    Co-Authors: Samantha Mcneilly

    Abstract:

    AUM Library Research Guides. COMM 4620: Aural Rehabilitation, Habilitation, and Hearing Conservation (Alisha Jones). Reference Books.

Milijana Malmberg – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • experiences of an internet based Aural Rehabilitation iar program for hearing aid users a qualitative study
    International Journal of Audiology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Milijana Malmberg, Gerhard Andersson, Thomas Lunner, Elisabet Sundewall Thoren, Marie Oberg, Kim Kahari

    Abstract:

    AbstractObjective: Internet interventions for hearing aid (HA) users have been shown to be effective in helping persons with hearing problems. As earlier research refers to objective data on these effects, little is known about how participants experience the Internet interventions subjectively. The aim of the present study was to explore participants’ experiences of an Internet-based Aural Rehabilitation (IAR) program for HA-users, and to explore the possible subjective benefits of such a program.Design: A qualitative exploratory design was implemented involving semi-structured telephone interviews. The interviews were transcribed and analysed using content analysis.Study sample: Interviews were conducted with 20 participants (9 men and 11 women) who had completed an IAR program for HA-users. The participants were 57–81 years old and had used HAs for 2–25 years.Results: The results are organised in three main categories: general experiences associated with participating in the program, knowledge obtained…

  • evaluating the short term and long term effects of an internet based Aural Rehabilitation programme for hearing aid users in general clinical practice a randomised controlled trial
    BMJ Open, 2017
    Co-Authors: Milijana Malmberg, Thomas Lunner, Kim Kahari, Gerhard Andersson

    Abstract:

    Objective Guided internet-based intervention beyond hearing aid (HA) fitting has been shown to be efficacious in randomised controlled trials (RCTs). However, internet interventions have rarely been applied clinically as a part of regular Aural Rehabilitation (AR). Our aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of internet-based AR for HA users from a clinical population. Outcome measures The Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE) was used as the primary outcome measure, and the Communication Strategies Scale (CSS) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were used as secondary outcome measures. All questionnaires were administered before and directly after the intervention and at 6 months postintervention. Methods We used a parallel group design (RCT). The data were collected in 2013–2014 at three different clinics. Seventy-four HA users were randomly assigned to receive either full internet-based AR (intervention group, n=37) or one element of the internet-based AR (control group, n=37). Results Data were analysed following the intention-to-treat principle. Each group showed improved HHIE scores over time and did not differ significantly from each other. The intervention group showed significantly greater improvement compared with the control group for the CSS total and the non-verbal subscale scores. The intervention group and control group were also subdivided into two age groups: 20–59 years and 60–80 years. Significantly better improvement on the CSS total and non-verbal subscale scores was found in the older group compared with the younger participants. Conclusions This study indicates that participants in an internet-based intervention applied in general clinical practice showed improved self-reported communication skills compared with a control group. Receiving a full intervention was not more effective in improving self-reported hearing problems than receiving just one element of the internet-based intervention. Trial registration number This trial is registered at ClinicalTrals.gov, NCT01837550; results.

  • implementing internet based Aural Rehabilitation in a general clinical practice
    American Journal of Audiology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Milijana Malmberg, Gerhard Andersson, Thomas Lunner, Kim Kahari, Gunilla Jansson

    Abstract:

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to share the lessons that were learned about the process of implementing an Internet-based, randomized controlled trial (RCT) in general clinical practice (GCP) and to address some of the advantages of using the Internet as a tool to implement a RCT in GCP. The RCT implemented focused on investigating Internet-based Aural Rehabilitation (AR) in addition to hearing aid (HA)-fitting supplemented with telephone support, and it was applied in a clinical setting. The results of this RCT and the questionnaires chosen will be presented in an article elsewhere. Procedure Here, the procedure of the implemented trial is presented, and the implementation challenges are presented and discussed. Specifically, we describe the trial research question, recruitment strategy, patient eligibility criteria, the questionnaires, clinician participation, funding and time (for the clinicians), and risks and benefits (for the participants). Discussion The trial implementation showed that AR in…